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A pacemaker for the brain helped a woman with crippling depression. It may soon offer hope to others

13 Comments
By LAURA UNGAR

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13 Comments
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Sounds pretty radical considering the ssris are so effective and side effect free, but I guess they don't work for everyone.

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

Anecdotal evidence and ridiculous thing to do

-7 ( +4 / -11 )

Anecdotal evidence and ridiculous thing to do

The studies mentioned and those that are planned to continue are not anecdotal evidence, even a single case report is well above what an anecdote is as evidence, and considering depression (and the treatments being tried for it) ridiculous only evidence a complete lack of empathy for the many patients that suffer from the condition.

1 ( +5 / -4 )

Virusrex

How do you deduce I lack empathy for the person or any person. What makes you think I cannot empathise with those suffering, are you claiming I’m a sociopath?

-5 ( +4 / -9 )

SSRI theory now much discounted....and drugs like Pail have a severe "discontinuation syndrome ""...google ""Paxil Progress "" for an insight into individual struggles.

I remember in the 70's and 80s' "ECT " or electro convulsive therapy was commonly used...I used to revive patients post procedure.

Bizarre thing...a "telephone like " attachment was placed on the temple and a large electric shock administered.

The procedure described in the article seems like more of the same...all about the electricity ...probably not.

My sympathy to all sufferers , depression is a life long MONGREL DISEASE...that one has to learn to accept.

4 ( +5 / -1 )

How do you deduce I lack empathy for the person or any person

What other explanation can be to qualify of ridiculous something that effectively treated a disabling condition for a patient? For that patient the treatment greatly improved her quality of life and the experts have worked decades to reach that point. Empathizing with her suffering is not congruent with calling ridiculous a science based approach that greatly benefited her.

0 ( +4 / -4 )

It’s interesting but certainly not practical. A lot of people with crippling depression also have crippling anxiety and a host of other concurrent issues and, if they have insurance, I doubt elective brain surgery would be covered by their providers.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Awesome! A tortured mind can be hell on earth.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

As a person suffering from depression... wires on the brain does not seem very welcoming, wires fail, rust, broke, do electrolisis under certain conditions, and so on. Although it may be a better option than, Elon's crazy chip on the brain idea.

...Also, the brain does not feel pain

0 ( +3 / -3 )

The studies mentioned and those that are planned to continue are not anecdotal evidence, even a single case report is well above what an anecdote is as evidence, and considering depression (and the treatments being tried for it) ridiculous only evidence a complete lack of empathy for the many patients that suffer from the condition.

FFS is right; and instead of flinging ad hominem attacks at him, you should rely on the experts, as he has:

But some doctors are skeptical, pointing to potential complications such as bleeding, stroke or infection after surgery.

Dr. Stanley Caroff, a University of Pennsylvania emeritus professor of psychiatry, said scientists still don't know the exact brain pathways or mechanisms that produce depression. And it's also tough to select the right patients for DBS, he said.

*“I believe from a psychiatric point of view, the science is not there,” he said of DBS for depression.*

-5 ( +4 / -9 )

FFS is right

Yet you are unable to refute the point, the article is clearly supported by studies or case reports, which are not anecdotes.

Also the argument that demonstrate calling a very effective treatment that benefit a patient that suffered from a crippling disease as a show of lack of empathy remains, you have not been able to refute it, nor is the argument that a person is wrong for lacking empathy, thus not an ad hominem fallacy.

DBS is still in study, and people can be skeptical about it curing all cases, but nobody disputes that for some patients it is beneficial and so it is justified to keep it under investigation, even if it ends up helping only a portion of the cases that is still a valid thing to do, the science is not there to generalize for every patient, but for those that recieve a benefit this is not just chance.

1 ( +4 / -3 )

Also the argument that demonstrate calling a very effective treatment that benefit a patient that suffered from a crippling disease as a show of lack of empathy remains,

Nowhere in the article is the word "empathy" mentioned, so that is just your opinion without factual basis.

-4 ( +1 / -5 )

Nowhere in the article is the word "empathy" mentioned, so that is just your opinion without factual basis.

The comment do not reference the article, it makes reference to another comment that considers ridiculous using an effective treatment for a person with a crippling health problem.

The simple fact you have not been able to argue how this is not the case demonstrates it is a perfectly good example of lacking empathy with the patient.

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

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