health

After COVID jab, BioNTech sets sights on malaria vaccine

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Malaria is a complete different thing when talking about vaccines, a wide variety of approaches have been tested already giving only very humble results, and most candidates fail to reach even clinical trials.

For viruses the immune response is relatively simple, so it becomes also easy to evaluate dozens of candidates and choose the best to keep testing, for parasites the immune response is still badly understood, things that should be working nicely end up offering no protection, while candidates that do poorly on tests still protect some of the animals by unknown mechanisms.

A big hint that this is not going to be easy is that the natural infection also completely fails to protect people on the long term, mRNA is not likely to solve all the problems that have made a malaria vaccine still an unfinished project.

4 ( +11 / -7 )

Well Done Sir, Glad to see the world paying attention to this monster Malaria, so many kids die yearly in Africa, S.E Asia and more because of it. Good Luck and hope to see it available soon.

4 ( +7 / -3 )

Good !!..

Science moving forward..

3 ( +6 / -3 )

@virusex

Again you are trying to give an opinion based on zero expertise on the matter and end up writing really something almost totally meaningless.

A big hint that this is not going to be easy is that the natural infection also completely fails to protect people on the long term

This is more complicated than that. In regions where malaria is highly endemic, a part of the population is carrying the Plasmodium parasite responsible of the disease and is asymptomatic. It is believed that this results from several years of chronic infection from the parasite, and that some people develop a tolerance to it and a natural immunity.

For viruses the immune response is relatively simple, so it becomes also easy to evaluate dozens of candidates and choose the best to keep testing, for parasites the immune response is still badly understood, things that should be working nicely end up offering no protection, while candidates that do poorly on tests still protect some of the animals by unknown mechanisms.

This makes no sense whatsoever. Since you are not a scientist, you are trying to use your own words for a subject that you don’t understand and then just make things up. The real difficulty to develop a vaccin against Plasmodium is that during its lifetime, the parasite goes through several stages with phases of intense asexual multiplication in humans (in liver cells - hepatic phase, then in red blood cell - phase erythrocyte), and a phase of sexed reproduction followed by multiplication in the insects. Each phase ends by the formation of parasites of different form carrying different antigens and therefore resulting in different immune response that complicates the development of an effective vaccin.

and most candidates fail to reach even clinical trials.

The only available vaccin so far is the RTS,S. It had favorable results in phase III and a trial campaign is ongoing since 2018 in several African countries to asses it’s effectiveness in normal conditions of use.

-4 ( +5 / -9 )

LMAO. Since when is an insect born parasite similar to a viral infection that experimental mRNA gene therapy treatment is increasingly being shown to be unsuccessful .

In a conference call with reporters, Sahin said he believed BioNTech's malaria efforts have "a high likelihood for success".

Just like the success of the current Covid debacle. They should at least wait to confirm success on that experiment.

https://www.channelnewsasia.com/news/world/most-covid-19-cases-in-massachusetts-outbreak-among-vaccinated-15342366

I believe the mRNA infomercial posters should stick with their short lived promotion of EUA medicines, where they can rely on the unknown data to support their essays.

-7 ( +3 / -10 )

LMAO. Since when is an insect born parasite similar to a viral infection that experimental mRNA gene therapy treatment is increasingly being shown to be unsuccessful .

That is of course completely false, but people that desperately try to hide the numbers on complications and deaths are obviously not interested in informing but instead deceiving so the bias is obvious.

The problems with malaria are not because of the technology but because of the parasite, mRNA itself have shown to be hugely safer than expected and unexpectedly effective even against variants against which it was not designed.

4 ( +6 / -2 )

Again you are trying to give an opinion based on zero expertise on the matter and end up writing really something almost totally meaningless.

And again you are wrong, trying to guess the expertise of other people without being able to do it (nor having any proof of whatever you imagine I am) and projecting your lack of understanding as if it were the fault of anybody else, also apparently you still think it is necessary to read things that supposedly cause you pain.

Nothing in your comment contradicts anything I wrote, you are just repeating exactly the fact that natural immunity fails completely to clear the infection. Having literally hundreds of candidates from which only a few reach clinical trials is also exactly what "most candidates fail to reach even clinical trials" means, contradicting yourself so completely should have been a hint about who had the problem understanding.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

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