health

Asymptomatic virus sufferers lose antibodies sooner: study

13 Comments
By Khaled DESOUKI

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13 Comments
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Good time to remind people that the decrease in antibodies is typical, but memory lymphocytes generally remain for a long time, perhaps a lifetime. These memory cells offer protection (immunity) against future infections even if the actual antibodies are low. That is the case for those who recovered from the 1st SARS CoV (17 years ago); they still have the memory lymphocytes.

I realize that we don't know whether the memory cells in asymptomatic people are high enough, but if someone effectively mounted a defense against a first infection and produced antibodies, they should be able to effectively do it again if they re-encounter the virus.

BTW, what is an "asymptomatic virus sufferer", if one is asymptomatic, they don't suffer!

4 ( +10 / -6 )

BTW, what is an "asymptomatic virus sufferer", if one is asymptomatic, they don't suffer!

The best term is "asymptomatic virus carrier" but some want to emphasize the increased and yet not fully understood risks (cardiac, neurologic, immunologic, endocrine, etc.) the infected people "suffer" after the infection. In this case the term is used on purpose to signal that infected people may not be as healthy as non infected ones even without symptoms.

It may be a fad, and not all experts like the word used like this, but it is not invalid.

3 ( +8 / -5 )

Oh, I see. So I guess we should refer to people who get a vaccine as "vaccine sufferers."

-4 ( +4 / -8 )

Oh, I see. So I guess we should refer to people who get a vaccine as "vaccine sufferers."

No, because the risk after vaccination is decreased when compared with non-vaccinated people. It is very simple once you understand correctly that vaccines are hugely less risky than the natural infection according to the best scientific evidence.

Of course, for people that choose not to see the reality but only their imaginary conspiracies where science and health are the enemy this task is not possible. It requires being rational.

3 ( +8 / -5 )

Most vaccinated people suffer from minor issues such as pain at the injection site, fever, headache, chills, and some have more serious problems like myocarditis, paralysis, and death. I think all of those qualify more as suffering than one being asymptomatic.

-4 ( +4 / -8 )

Most vaccinated people suffer from minor issues such as pain at the injection site, fever, headache, chills, and some have more serious problems like myocarditis, paralysis, and death. I think all of those qualify more as suffering than one being asymptomatic.

The correct term would be secondary effects sufferers. Since the vast majority of the people vaccinated do not get any issue independently from the mechanical action of an injection (and of course the hugely much less frequent serious problems) it is not valid to assign to the vaccine a generalized effect. For COVID-19 the effect (higher risk of long term problems) is generalized and present.

And if we take in consideration the total risks assumed, the action of vaccinating reduces the risk of all negative side effects, specially the serious ones and death when compared with people that are not vaccinated. In this case it would be much more valid to call the people that refuse vaccinations for irrational fears based on misleading and false information "vaccine hesitancy sufferers" since they remain unnecessarily exposed to higher risks than if they were vaccinated.

4 ( +8 / -4 )

Surely, as refusing to accept the evidence is intrinsically irrational it should be classed as a mental disorder, so they are mental health sufferers! Or in the older terminology, loonies.

4 ( +5 / -1 )

If what Rawbeer says

0 ( +1 / -1 )

about lymphocytes is correct it would have been nice to have that in the article. It left me with the thought any vaccine would likely have a very short effective time. (Double post due to my Google phone probably trying to get my last piece of data to sell)

3 ( +3 / -0 )

I was going to say what Raw Beer said, that the passing of detectable antibodies is not the same thing as losing immunity.

The amount of news about the research into this virus is amazing. Was reading today about the research into a vaccine, and it is impressive, to say the least.

5 ( +5 / -0 )

If what Rawbeer says about lymphocytes is correct it would have been nice to have that in the article.

Indeed, the experts at Imperial College certainly know this. I've been complaining about this for months. Everything seems to be worded to make us worried, perhaps to make us want to get an annual vaccine when in fact many of us are probably already immune to Civid19.

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

I must be Asymptomatic

I m still alive and not sure if i ever caught the virus. There been days where I felt like crap and had a fever but never know if it is Covid or not. SO i am Asymptomatic i want to beleive so no worries for me.

-3 ( +0 / -3 )

Everything seems to be worded to make us worried, perhaps to make us want to get an annual vaccine

That is completely contradictory, the same mechanism has been already been corroborated in the leading vaccine candidates, so the same reasons why people might have long lasting immunity after heavily symptomatic COVID-19 are the ones that support that vaccination would also produce it.

If you argue that vaccines are likely to protect for a year you are arguing that cellular immunity also has only that much of an effect .

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

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