health

COVID vaccines block disease, but do they stop infection?

13 Comments
By Marlowe HOOD

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If they don't stop the infection being passed there's no justification for social pressure to take these

If I don't take mine then there's no harm no foul upon those around me.

They're only meant to protect the individual recipient.

-4 ( +8 / -12 )

If they don't stop the infection being passed there's no justification for social pressure to take these

The data is already pointing out to a reduction to transmission of the disease, its even written here in this article, what we still don't know is how much but as long as a reduction is confirmed then there is a benefit for those around the vaccinated people.

Even without reduced transmission having immune people also reduce the risk of new variants appearing (since the virus can be neutralized inside the body before new mutations become dangerous).

1 ( +10 / -9 )

If they don't stop the infection being passed there's no justification for social pressure to take these

"The big concern is that the vaccines prevent illness, hospitalisation and death..."

6 ( +8 / -2 )

Of course not, that’s bare of any logic. If you are vaccinated, you can still breath in a full virus load or a multiple load of it, and although your vaccination keeps you from developing the COVID-19 disease you will still breathe or cough those viruses out so that they are widely spread or directly transmitted to anyone still not vaccinated. First think, before you speak out such stupid theses of a holy almighty vaccine.

-3 ( +5 / -8 )

If they don't stop the infection being passed there's no justification for social pressure to take these

And if they do, are you saying there is a case for social pressure to take the vaccine?

If you are vaccinated, you can still breath in a full virus load or a multiple load of it, and although your vaccination keeps you from developing the COVID-19 disease you will still breathe or cough those viruses out so that they are widely spread or directly transmitted to anyone still not vaccinated.

Maybe I've misunderstood what you wrote, but if you only breathe out what you breathe in, then I don't think there is much of an issue. Is the question not about whether the virus continues to reproduce in vaccinated people? Data is limited, but as the article says about tests with the Moderna vaccine, there is reason to think it will reduce transmission.

8 ( +9 / -1 )

@albaleo Yes, I know what you mean. It’s not completely wrong. That would be valid of course, if all people are vaccinated or let’s say have that 80% herd immunity. Then it is not anymore so very much important, if the viruses replicate much or less. In general, it’s like in some proverbs always a question of the amount or dose, or in this case the amount of viruses you are exposed to. Even with a vaccination one will surely get severely sick or die if surrounded by many viruses for a long time and taking no care anymore, only relying on the vaccination.

-7 ( +2 / -9 )

Of course not, that’s bare of any logic. If you are vaccinated, you can still breath in a full virus load or a multiple load of it, and although your vaccination keeps you from developing the COVID-19 disease you will still breathe or cough those viruses out so that they are widely spread or directly transmitted to anyone still not vaccinated. First think, before you speak out such stupid theses of a holy almighty vaccine.

Did you even read the article? it completely contradicts you, findings say that vaccinated people apparently don't transmit the disease as easily, and that are found negative on the tests much more frequently, which means they are not breathing a full virus load, not even enough to be detected.

Even with a vaccination one will surely get severely sick or die if surrounded by many viruses for a long time and taking no care anymore, only relying on the vaccination.

That is the whole point of the vaccines, that they importantly decrease the risk of getting a serious complication or die by the infection, which by definition means a huge lot of viruses being produced constantly in the body.

3 ( +7 / -4 )

If I don't take mine then there's no harm no foul upon those around me.

They're only meant to protect the individual recipient.

yes nobody is forcing you to take it, but if individuals that dont wear a mask either vaccinated or not then there is foul if you get infected are asymptomatic and spread it unknowing to other individuals. those that are infected, asymptomatic carriers but are immunised then they will have very small risk of it become severe compared to individuals not immunised . I can tell you Id much prefer to be immunised and become infected than not.

sorry motorcycle helmets wont protect you against infection

3 ( +4 / -1 )

Ahh, yes, the science.

I can tell you Id much prefer to be immunised and become infected than not.

I'll wait until the scientists can make up their minds on the science before jamming a needle in my arm, No thanks.

-3 ( +4 / -7 )

I'll wait until the scientists can make up their minds on the science before jamming a needle in my arm, No thanks.

so far the data is looking very good, deaths by immunisation is almost insignificant couple hundred in 10s millions vaccinated, immunisation give you around 94% immunity to the virus, those not immunised have a 2~3% chance of dying from covid. yes the science and the math clearly show the risk of serious complication from contracting the virus is reduced significantly. ive had multiple vaccinations throughout my life smallpox, measles, influenza, chickenpox diphtheria, including my wife ,children, mother father, never had any side effects in my family. dont want the vaccine , fine one less person in line waiting

4 ( +6 / -2 )

dont want the vaccine , fine one less person in line waiting

Yup!

0 ( +4 / -4 )

"COVID vaccines block disease, but do they stop infection?"

Answer: No, unfortunately not. It reduces some symptoms (cough and headache). 3 shots will not stop infection, transmission, hospitalization, adverse events or death.

https://www.bmj.com/content/371/bmj.m4037

"Yet the current phase III trials are not actually set up to prove either (table 1). None of the trials currently under way are designed to detect a reduction in any serious outcome such as hospital admissions, use of intensive care, or deaths. Nor are the vaccines being studied to determine whether they can interrupt transmission of the virus."

I'll wait until the scientists can make up their minds on the science before jamming a needle in my arm, No thanks.

Agreed. That would be the wiser choice to make at this time. We can gather data and make our own decisions on if the vaccine is effective or not (which in my findings unfortunately not). Much more risk than any benefit but of course pharma connected reps will highly disagree and present their "pharma fact-checked" reasons why.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Answer: No, unfortunately not. It reduces some symptoms (cough and headache). 3 shots will not stop infection, transmission, hospitalization, adverse events or death.

Not preventing infection is not a problem, that is part of the expected function of the vaccine, and by this time it has been scientifically proved the approved vaccines do reduce the rates of hospitalization, adverse events and death (because death do not happen the same for all patients independently of symptoms). It has also become clear the vaccines also reduce transmission, so the whole argument has been proved false.

Trials can be made to prove things indirectly, you don't need to compare deaths to be able to say the intervention prevents them, it is as easy as to see that the complications and heavily symptomatic patients are reduced, once again because those are the patients that end up as fatalities. The criticism can only apply if an asymptomatic patient and a patient in the ICU have the same risk of dying of COVID, this is obviously not the case.

The wiser choice is of course do what represents less risk, the vaccine is without a doubt the less risky option for any patient for which is indicated.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

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