health

Early cholesterol treatment lowers heart disease risk: study

9 Comments
By PAUL J RICHARDS

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© 2019 AFP

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Statins are great medication. I have mild familial hypercholesterolemia and to keep my cholesterol even borderline I eat an extremely high fiber diet, exercise at least an hour every day, and take (now) a low dose statin. The statin wasn't enough to control it. Like we're talking I brought it down from the 300's to 180. Young, healthy people tend to think they won't have this problem. Luckily I knew because of family problems and caught mine early. Get checked, keep healthy people!

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How about eating healthily and not smoking? People (and pharmaceutical companies) are always thinking of how to cure problems, but not thinking of how to prevent them in the first place. I know there are some people who have problems through no fault of their own, but many others bring it on themselves.

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Once you are on statins, you are more or less on them for life. Get opinions from several doctors who specialize in the treatment of cholesterol-related illnesses before committing to any course of treatment.

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People (and pharmaceutical companies) are always thinking of how to cure problems, but not thinking of how to prevent them in the first place. 

Untrue. Eat healthily and don't smoke: you just gave the most medically uncontroversial advice possible. It's hardly something that physicians neglect to suggest their patients, and as basic advice it was around before you or I were born. But they also have to diagnose and treat, and a physician saying that people "bring it on themselves" doesn't move diagnosis and treatment forward in any way at all. They even have to treat people who bring it on themselves - which applies to a very high proportion of their patients: ask any doctor who has treated someone who was injured in an "accident" or while exercising or playing sports.

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statins is a scam, make you weaker.

there is plenty controversial info about that medical treatment , it is just a money maker drug...

cholesterol effect is not well know yet.

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Statins are over prescribed, they should be only given in certain circumstances.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fyEMdcCxCEU

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x-jp6RSTUNM

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wipeout:

It's hardly something that physicians neglect to suggest their patients

I never said physicians didn't suggest this. The problem is whether people listen or not. Obviously some people don't, otherwise this world would not be having such a big obesity problem. Of course, poverty, ironically, is to blame too, but I don't think people like Trump and Chris Christie are poor.

a physician saying that people "bring it on themselves" doesn't move diagnosis and treatment forward

I never said physicians say people bring it on themselves. I said it.

Please stop putting words in my mouth.

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I never said physicians say people bring it on themselves. I said it.

Yes, and I explained why physicians aren't in a position to share your attitude. When people become sick, it isn't much use telling them they shouldn't have done whatever it was they did, or telling them they don't deserve treatment because they haven't been virtuous enough. Physicians treat sickness; dishing out homilies is not a recognized part of their duties. Some still do it of course, but it's basically a free extra, like smiling.

So to drag this back to what was covered in the article, it was reporting a study published in the Lancet, a journal that leans heavily towards physicians as its target readership, and it was reporting a study that was headed by a physician, and the subject of the study was the value of a particular medication in the context of particular treatments and outcomes. There is no part of this article in which physicians aren't relevant to what was reported, and the reported study was about treatment of patients with high cholesterol, not exploring "how could they avoid having high cholesterol in the first place?".

I take it that your reply to me is to explain that your original comments had no relevance at all to the study, and were never even intended to. Is that about the size of it?

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As I see my doctor in two weeks and have blood tests for other things, I will be asking about my cholesterol level, which I don't believe has been checked for over a year.  This was a good article.

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