health

Higher antibiotic doses may make bacteria 'fitter': study

4 Comments
By Patrick GALEY

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© 2021 AFP

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Got to be careful of unintended consequences eh

2 ( +2 / -0 )

NDM-1, an enzyme found on some bacteria that makes them resistant to antibiotics, is named after New Delhi since it was in a hospital there that it was discovered on a Swedish patient.

https://www.chemistryworld.com/news/poor-antibiotic-stewardship-blamed-as-india-found-to-be-superbugs-birthplace/4010954.article

Indian doctors have been known to prescribe antibiotics even for the smallest infections.

From the above article -

As meat production continues to grow in developing countries, antibiotic resistance is also rapidly spreading through animals as farmers rely heavily on antibiotics to keep livestock healthy. The epicentres of antibiotic resistance in animals lie in India and China. Kamini Walia, a scientist at the division of epidemiology and communicable diseases at the Indian Council of Medical Research, says two things drive resistance in people in India: irrational use of antibiotics and poor sanitation.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

I thought the problem of overprescribing antibiotics was known for decades als well as treating livestock resulting in the development of MRSA.

If this keeps going the last hope will be phagotherapy.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

I thought the problem of overprescribing antibiotics was known for decades als well as treating livestock resulting in the development of MRSA.

This is a different problem, not about prescribing antibiotics for things that are not necessary but about the best dose for those that are.

This is because it is already known that for some infections that last for longer than usual the normal dose of antibiotics has a small chance of not killing the bacteria fast enough to prevent the appearance of antibiotic resistance. A solution that has been tried is to prescribe a much higher dose, since theoretically this would kill the bacteria much faster and so prevent resistant variants. The results of this research project show that is not so easy, giving a huge dose kill the bacteria in less time but also makes them develop resistance much faster, so the main objective is not achieved and the patient is exposed to an extra risk without benefits.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

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