health

How autism in girls may help reveal the disorder's secrets

6 Comments
By LINDSEY TANNER

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The suspect: vaccines.

-5 ( +0 / -5 )

The suspect: vaccines.

I was skeptical about the vaccine link to autism until my daughter convinced me to watch the documentary "Trace Amounts". The evidence presented, and those individuals who supported it, were very compelling.

-4 ( +0 / -4 )

I was skeptical about the vaccine link to autism until my daughter convinced me to watch the documentary "Trace Amounts". The evidence presented, and those individuals who supported it, were very compelling.

So compelling that the fact that the connection has been so completely debunked it's ridiculous is ignored by you?

4 ( +5 / -1 )

So ridiculous that in July 1999, the Public Health Service agencies, the American Academy of Pediatrics, and vaccine manufacturers agreed that thimerosal should be reduced or eliminated in vaccines? By 2001 it was completely removed from all vaccines in the US, however, it is still included in vaccines sold in the developing world.

-3 ( +0 / -3 )

By 2001 it was completely removed from all vaccines in the US, however, it is still included in vaccines sold in the developing world.

And of course Autism after 2001 disappeared from US righ?

Its obvious that anybody working with vaccines knows about the importance of vaccinating, so if the population is fooled into fearing an ingredient that can be replaced, the easiest way to deal with this is just eliminate that ingredient instead of trying to convince people that don't care about evidence anymore. The problem is that health authorities failed to consider that this kind of people are not so good at reasoning either so instead of vaccinating again now that the dreaded thimerosal was no longer included, they instead began to search for other excuses to reject the vaccines.

Putting in higher risk their own children and the population in general is not something that this kind of people care about, therefore the huge amount of research that has been done both in autism and vaccines (such as the article is talking about) is wasted on them. As long as is against what they believe they will reject all amount of evidence presented, and if it fits with their mistaken beliefs then they will believe even known crooks and convicted liars.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

So ridiculous that in July 1999, the Public Health Service agencies, the American Academy of Pediatrics, and vaccine manufacturers agreed that thimerosal should be reduced or eliminated in vaccines.

Not because it was causing autism, but because there was widespread public anxiety about its use. And since it was removed, there has been no demonstrable drop in autism rates, which makes a cause-and-effect connection between thimerosal and autism effectively proven to be false.

Anti-vaccine sentiment hasn't particularly dropped off either, so we're back where we started. As long as vaccines exist, people will exist who claim they cause autism. Their evidence will be as poor as it's always been (in effect, nonexistent), and when any developments like the elimination of thimerosal or certain countries not using the MMR combination result in no consequent decrease in autism, this will simpy be ignored by antivaxers, or the arguments will be reframed to pin the blame on other vaccines.

But where we're at at the moment is that thimerosal does not cause autism, MMR vaccinations do not cause autism, and vaccines do not cause autism. Thankfully, not all parents of autistic children buy into the anti-vaccination crap, but of those who do, the motivation is very often a desire to remove all possibility that they themselves may be responsible, however blamelessly, for their child's condition. In other words, they would rather not face the possibility of a genetic cause, and vaccines make a damn good scapegoat. Sadly, not one without severe consequences for wider society.

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