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Loud sounds at movies and concerts can cause hearing loss, but there are ways to protect your ears

26 Comments
By Cory Portnuff

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Most larger concerts are loud enough to damage the hearing of all those present, but because the damage is incremental, they carry on. Most concert goers are young and (as with a suntan) they don't see the response as damage. There seems to be some sort of macho desire to have really loud concerts, as they will never be prosecuted for causing hearing loss. It's like lung cancer not being attributable to the sale of an individual pack of cigarettes.

Most of these concerts nudge you closer to tinnitus. You really don't want that.

Concerts don't need to be that loud to be enjoyable. I don't know why they do it. Maybe someone could ask them.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

'AURORA, Colo - Ever go [sic] to the movies or a rock concert and been blasted by the sound?'

No, I did not go. But more to the point; why is an American clinical audiologist issuing advice about attending rock concerts in Japan?

-3 ( +0 / -3 )

I'm a deaf former rock bassist, with a bad case of tinnitus. In my day, all the amps and speakers were behind us. 1000s of watts, speaker towers (my own quad 18-inch Cerwin Vegas driven by four 300-watt slave amps). The article's writer is simply telling you to avoid that kind of thing. Still have three of my basses, though, and still write bass lines for studio stuff. Just can't hear the works.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Whenever I went to a Heavy Metal concert like Hawkwind I was always at the back of the hall.

-1 ( +3 / -4 )

When went to see Shonen Knife, we bopped at the front next to the bass player.

3 ( +5 / -2 )

Elvis is hereOct. 1  07:45 pm JST

When went to see Shonen Knife, we bopped at the front next to the bass player.

Every time I've seen Shonen Knife, it was in a club but the sounds were never overbearing. And it 'passed through' the crowd anyway, the club was always full.

It's different for indoor arenas and stadiums. Motley Crue once held the Guinness World Record for being the loudest band and from what I experienced from seeing them in 2014 I believe it. We were provided foam plugs from a booth outside. Opening act Alice Cooper (!) wasn't as loud but the Motleys sure were! We needed those plugs fershure.

But Motorhead was the loudest band I ever saw. I saw them in a theater with no ear protection whatsoever. Even the bass was loud, rumbling through the amps two stories high! That gave me a ringing in the ears for three straight days, 24 hours/day. We were all screaming and shouting at each other after the show without even knowing it!

In 2018 I caught Dinosaur Jr. at a beer fest, but since that was outdoors I had no hearing problems whatsoever afterward. In fact, later that night we caught the Little River Band at a casino gig. Everything was fine.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

Went to Motley Cue and Motorhead concerts. Always at the back always ear plugs. Today I still have perfect hearing.

-1 ( +3 / -4 )

Today I still have perfect hearing.

Me too.

2 ( +4 / -2 )

Loss of any of the five senses causes major problems. Like Trevor Peace. Many heavy metal and rock musicians have problems with their hearing.

-2 ( +2 / -4 )

That’s true even if it’s just a brief blast; a single gunshot or fireworks explosion can cause immediate damage to the ear.

Gunshot is very loud, even with ear protection.

-2 ( +3 / -5 )

Loud sounds inside a building are more damaging than when outside.

0 ( +4 / -4 )

"Noise above 70 dB over a prolonged period of time may start to damage your hearing. Loud noise above 120 dB can cause immediate harm to your ears."

I am happily living in a location where silence is golden and mostly free from mechanical sounds and all loud sounds. Nighttime is bliss.

-2 ( +2 / -4 )

Annual health checks do not usually include hearing tests. If for whatever reason you have been subject to long periods of loud sounds then having a hearing test would be advised. One-third of over 70s need a hearing aid.

-3 ( +1 / -4 )

Annual health checks do not usually include hearing tests

In Japan they do. Big headphones, sound proof room etc.

2 ( +4 / -2 )

Elvis is here

Annual health checks do not usually include hearing tests

> In Japan they do. Big headphones, sound proof room etc.

First I have heard of it. In more than 20 years of annual health checks, I was never offered a hearing test. More importantly, until we moved to our current location PSA tests were not offered. A much more serious situation for males.

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

In our part of Japan, hearing tests are not included in the annual health checks.

-5 ( +1 / -6 )

Long exposure to noise/sounds over 100 dB can cause a serious loss in hearing and in some cases deafness. People hearing headphones for long hours playing loud music.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Some countries including the American CIA use very loud sound/music as a form of torture.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Back on topic please.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Using a sound meter app can estimate how loud the environment is, and then you can decide if you need to protect your hearing.

This can be a useful way to prevent damage, and much more useful than just having annual tests that may only end up confirming you already have important hearing loss. For those that are not under employment in a company offering proper health checks this part of the examination may not even be included.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

For many years, there was a competition between certain bands of who was the loudest.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

Follow the advice in the article and save your ears.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

 But remember, it’s largely preventable. Taking action today can help you protect and preserve your hearing for a lifetime.

Exactly.

And good thing that no matter where you live in Japan, your annual health check will provide a hearing test.

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

yipyip

 But remember, it’s largely preventable. Taking action today can help you protect and preserve your hearing for a lifetime.

> Exactly.

> And good thing that no matter where you live in Japan, your annual health check will provide a hearing test.

Only when you are an employee. Not for the self-employed.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Unfortunately that is not the case, you can pay to get one privately, but those that are given for free 

It is definitely the case that in Japan you can get a health check and a hearing test as part of it.

Anyone denying this does not live in Japan.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

http://www.city.shinjuku.lg.jp/content/000369133.pdf no audiogram included in the health check, people that worry about hearing loss would then have search for a place by themselves to get the test.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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