Photo: SoraNews24
health

Matcha improves sleep quality, social cognition, researchers say, and you don’t need to drink it

9 Comments
By Casey Baseel, SoraNews24

Japan has loved matcha for centuries, and with its recent rise to stardom as a dessert flavor, it’s arguably more popular than ever. So green tea fans will be happy to hear that new research suggests matcha doesn’t just taste good, but is good for you in some very important ways.

Tea producer Itoen and MCBI, a medical research firm established by the University of Tsukuba, recently announced the results of a year-long clinical trial investigating the effects of a sustained daily intake of matcha. Starting with a group of 939 men and women between the ages of 60 and 85, 99 were diagnosed with either mild cognitive impairment (MCI) or subjective cognitive decline (SCD). Those 99 then took part in a year-long trial in which the target group consumed matcha every day for 12 months, while the control group was given placebos.

The participants underwent cognitive function and sleep quality evaluations, as well as various blood and neuroimaging tests, at the start and end of the trial, which the researchers describe as a double blind placebo-controlled randomized comparative study. At the end of the year, the matcha group, compared to the placebo group, displayed “a significant improvement in social cognition assessed with a facial expression recognition test, specifically, the precision of their perception of emotions based on facial expression.”

Screen-Shot-2022-08-08-at-8.32.02.png

In addition, the matcha group showed an improvement in their quality of sleep. This was determined using the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, a self-report questionnaire protocol in which a lower numerical score is indicative of better sleep.

Screen-Shot-2022-08-08-at-8.32.47.png

What’s especially interesting about the study is the manner in which the matcha was consumed. Each day, the matcha group consumed two grams of matcha, which is the average amount found in a cup of matcha green tea. However, the matcha was administered in capsule form. This would imply that the improvements the matcha group experienced weren’t the results of extra time spent relaxing or in quiet self-reflection while leisurely sipping a cup of tea, but were from the matcha itself, which in turn suggests that maybe the same benefits could be experienced from eating matcha sweets.

▼ The placebo group was given colored corn starch capsules, and so sadly the study provides no similar medical justification for also eating non-matcha candy.

Screen-Shot-2022-08-08-at-8.33.37.png

The results of the study were presented at the Alzheimer’s Association International Conference, held this month in San Diego, and while the matcha and control groups displayed no significant differences in other neuropsychological tests, the prospect of better sleep really means we’re now entirely out of reasons not to eat matcha ice cream for dessert every night from now on.

Source: Itoen via Shokuhin Sangyo Shimbun via Livedoor News

Insert images: ItoenPakutaso

Read more stories from SoraNews24.

-- New marvelous McDonald’s matcha dessert drinks have more Kyoto green tea powder than ever before

-- Starbucks Japan releases matcha scones and doughnuts with their new matcha Frappuccino

-- Kanpai! Japanese sweet sake found to have beauty benefits

© SoraNews24

©2022 GPlusMedia Inc.

9 Comments
Login to comment

What’s especially interesting about the study is the manner in which the matcha was consumed. Each day, the matcha group consumed two grams of matcha, which is the average amount found in a cup of matcha green tea. However, the matcha was administered in capsule form.

The study is described as a double blinded randomized study, that means neither the patients nor the people that are evaluating the results should know what they are taking. If the patients were taking matcha as usual it would be impossible to ensure they were blinded because they would be well aware of the taste of what they were drinking.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Just out of completeness, the graphs above don't really demonstrate anything. The confidence interval overlap in most cases, which means that there is no evidence that the difference is statistically significant (except for social cognition at 12 months). Stats 101

0 ( +2 / -2 )

And scientists in general should stop claiming positive results when there are none. This is a massive problem in scientific research

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Don't need to drink it, just snort it.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

A cup of matcha has 5 times more caffeine than a cup of coffee. How can any type of matcha including ice cream that has a lot more assist in sleeping?

0 ( +1 / -1 )

A cup of matcha has 5 times more caffeine than a cup of coffee.

Do you have a source? Searching online, I find a number sites that state that matcha generally contains less caffeine than coffee.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

albaleo : https://healermedicine.com/caffeine-matcha-vs-coffee/

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

@Bob Merlotte,

Thanks. The link is a little unclear. While it says, "It contains 5 times more of the substance than coffee", it also says, "If we are more precise, one cup of matcha contains 70mg of caffeine, meanwhile, a cup of coffee has 163mg of the substance." I'm guessing the 5 times part is based on the weight of the matcha or coffee, and the other figure is based on how much people generally use in a single cup.

The link below suggests matcha typically contains less caffeine.

https://www.womenshealthmag.com/food/a19921072/matcha-tea-versus-coffee/

Perhaps best to drink both just to be sure I'm getting enough. :-)

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Login to leave a comment

Facebook users

Use your Facebook account to login or register with JapanToday. By doing so, you will also receive an email inviting you to receive our news alerts.

Facebook Connect

Login with your JapanToday account

User registration

Articles, Offers & Useful Resources

A mix of what's trending on our other sites