health

Pandemic babies with developmental delays can be helped to make up for lost social interaction

8 Comments
By Abigail A Allen

The requested article has expired, and is no longer available. Any related articles, and user comments are shown below.

© The Conversation

©2022 GPlusMedia Inc.

8 Comments
Login to comment

Nowhere in the article does it mention one of the main culprits: masks.

Babies would be routinely in contact with unmasked adults in their homes, the delay is attributed to the lack of social interaction product from the isolation that at the time was necessary to reduce the risk for the population.

This comment is off-topic as the issue is Covid (which is obviously the pandemic being referred to).

This is a correction because viruses can cause speech impediments, just not SARS-CoV-2. Fortunately in this case the delays are much more easily corrected even if more frequent.

Letting them go outside and play with other kids unmasked will resolve most of these problems.

Which is something that has become easier since the risk from the pandemic has been reduced thanks to many different measures, the problem is that for some of the children this is not enough and an extra effort from the parents can have a big effect in solving a delay in development, specially in those cases where professional help may be necessary so making the parents aware of this possibility can prevent cases going untreated.

-3 ( +3 / -6 )

To be very clear, these long lasting developmental issues are directly related to the systemic overreaction propagated by media and public health authorities. The Conversation is a garbage publication.

2 ( +4 / -2 )

Letting them go outside and play with other kids unmasked will resolve most of these problems.

This article is nothing more than a mish-mash of stating the obvious and advocating for even more state interference in how parents raise their kids. As if state intervention hasn’t already done enough damage over the last couple of years.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

Yes they do when they cause meningitis or ecephalitis for example.

This comment is off-topic as the issue is Covid (which is obviously the pandemic being referred to).

Meningitis only results in speech impediments in a small percentage of children anyway,

COVID of course does not commonly do so but if the measures are still a better option (even with their inevitable costs) than letting more people die unnecessarily then this can be validly said to be a consequence of the pandemic.

Let's let this linger.

-4 ( +3 / -7 )

Nowhere in the article does it mention one of the main culprits: masks.

Developing children need to see mouths moving when people are speaking and masks are delaying their development.

0 ( +5 / -5 )

Panicdemic-related problems. Viruses don't cause speech impediments

Yes they do when they cause meningitis or ecephalitis for example. COVID of course does not commonly do so but if the measures are still a better option (even with their inevitable costs) than letting more people die unnecessarily then this can be validly said to be a consequence of the pandemic.

-3 ( +3 / -6 )

Panicdemic-related problems. Viruses don't cause speech impediments

0 ( +5 / -5 )

Good article with simple recommendations that can help a lot of families worried about their children, it takes a bit of attention and care but so are many other things related to child care so it is difficult to think one extra detail can become a burden.

It is of importance also to consult with professionals if the problem seem important, as the article mentions there are services specialized on this kind of delay that can make a huge difference in the life of the child.

-2 ( +4 / -6 )

Login to leave a comment

Facebook users

Use your Facebook account to login or register with JapanToday. By doing so, you will also receive an email inviting you to receive our news alerts.

Facebook Connect

Login with your JapanToday account

User registration

Articles, Offers & Useful Resources

A mix of what's trending on our other sites