health

Recreational pot laws may boost traffic deaths, U.S. studies say

4 Comments
By LINDSEY TANNER

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I’m assuming these extra deaths are both the drivers who are actually using the drugs and the other motorists, but curious if it includes pedestrians and bicyclists?

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Pure BS from BS artists who either have a beef with people having fun or else they directly profit from the drug war on the American people 

To make such a claim, you would really need to study what is presumably a peer reviewed piece of research, rather than basing everything off your own personal point of view and the first couple of reasons to come off the top of your head. Not saying you're wrong, but you are jumping to a conspiracy-led conclusion.

I would think that if a drug is in more frequent use, it is likely to lead to deaths - we see that with alcohol. I certainly do not propose banning either alcohol or marijuana, but still think it is likely that both lead to traffic deaths.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

Alcohol is the worse drug you can get intoxified leading to a blackout and does more harm that Cannabis and probably no such thing as overdosing like alcohol poisoning and live failure. That being said any substance that will alter your reaction time and cognition behind a wheel will lead to accidents no doubt. The key is drink and smoke responsibly and follow the rules and regulations.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

From NCBI.gov

August 2017

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5508149/

Results. Pre–recreational marijuana legalization annual changes in motor vehicle crash fatality rates for Washington and Colorado were similar to those for the control states. Post–recreational marijuana legalization changes in motor vehicle crash fatality rates for Washington and Colorado also did not significantly differ from those for the control states (adjusted difference-in-differences coefficient = +0.2 fatalities/billion vehicle miles traveled; 95% confidence interval = −0.4, +0.9).

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