health

What does COVID-19 vaccine effectiveness mean?

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healthy people do not need vaccine. now the question to know is if the vaccine is a harmful trojan or a placebo.

-9 ( +1 / -10 )

The companies' press releases suggest that the vaccines are about 90% effective. But what I am concerned with is how safe they are.

-6 ( +0 / -6 )

healthy people do not need vaccine. now the question to know is if the vaccine is a harmful trojan or a placebo.

Healthy people DO need a vaccine, it reduces the risk of having a serious complication or death, that do happen to people without any preexisting condition.

The data from the trials (conducted by not only the company but by professional testing firms and observers and inspectors from many different countries) indicate the vaccine is much safer than the natural infection, and that it helps preventing getting the disease even after infection. Questioning something is fine in the absence of any evidence, but it stops being rational if you already have it and proves what you believe is mistaken.

4 ( +8 / -4 )

Healthy people DO need a vaccine, it reduces the risk of having a serious complication or death, that do happen to people without any preexisting condition.

Perhaps it decreases the risk, perhaps it increases it.

Time will tell.

For now, healthy people should wait to get the vaccine, especially this rushed experimental vaccine.

And I hope independent researchers will be allowed to inspect the data and we don't need to rely only on the BigPharma press releases.

-7 ( +0 / -7 )

Perhaps it decreases the risk, perhaps it increases it.

There is absolutely no information that would indicate it would increase it, there is also no contraindication to getting the vaccine and if the final results are examined and found coherent with the partial results it would be much better for healthy people to take it than to refuse it. Vaccine approved after 6 months of phase III trials are not rushed and follow the same schedule as others already in use today.

Believing otherwise is just faith, not logic.

5 ( +7 / -2 )

Indigo, raw beer, talk about fake news and spreading fear and conspiracy theories! A vaccine is designed to help prevent or mitigate the effects of catching a disease, so obviously it is better to have before you get infected, ergo while you are healthy so yes healthy people do need a vaccine.

Any vaccine released for use will be inspected for efficacy and safety by the various regulatory authorities, they and the results of the trials will be scrutinised by numerous experts in the field (unlike you and I).

4 ( +5 / -1 )

Dr. Shruti Gohil, associate medical director of epidemiology and infection prevention at UCI Health, says the rigorous clinical trial process used to test vaccines was developed over decades.

“A vaccine that is not useful or worse yet, not proven to be safe, risks far more injury to the public than no vaccine at all,” she said.

“These harms extend beyond the current coronavirus pandemic,” she added. “A poorly vetted vaccine could end up causing greater harm to vaccine acceptance by the public for other well-vetted and extremely effective vaccines.”

A large number of Americans are already hesitant about a COVID-19 vaccine. A Gallup poll last month found that 35 percent would not get the vaccine, even if it were free and approved by the Food and Drug Administration.

-3 ( +1 / -4 )

they and the results of the trials will be scrutinised by numerous experts in the field

I hope the results will be released in peer-reviewed journals before the public get the vaccines.

A vaccine is designed to help prevent or mitigate the effects of catching a disease, so obviously it is better to have before you get infected,

I agree, but only if the vaccine is absolutely safe.

Also, regarding the Pfizer/BioNTech vaccine, it was tested for its effectiveness against getting the symptoms of Covid19, not the actual infection.

So since healthy people will likely get no or little symptoms from the virus, they should wait to get the vaccine, especially this rushed experimental vaccine.

-4 ( +0 / -4 )

A large number of Americans are already hesitant about a COVID-19 vaccine. A Gallup poll last month found that 35 percent would not get the vaccine, even if it were free and approved by the Food and Drug Administration

Yes, because the public (especially in some countries) are in constant bombardment of misleading and false information of people that profit from seeding distrust in science. Popularity is not what makes a testing protocol adequate or not, that always come to science, hesitancy can be the result of manipulating people with false arguments.

I agree, but only if the vaccine is absolutely safe.

Actually as long as the vaccine is safer than not being vaccinated it would still be better, there is nothing that is absolutely safe.

Also, regarding the Pfizer/BioNTech vaccine, it was tested for its effectiveness against getting the symptoms of Covid19, not the actual infection.

Yeah, because that is what vaccines do, the idea that vaccines stop the infection is mistaken. What vaccines do is make the infection less dangerous and symptomatic. There is no vaccine made to stop getting infected, their purpose is to avoid getting sick.

A safe and effective vaccine can reduce the risk from the infection even for completely healthy people, that still can have serious health problems and death from COVID-19. The real reason they should wait is the availability that makes vulnerable population a priority, vaccines currently finishing phase III trial are not rushed and follow a protocol already used for safe and effective vaccines used currently.

Thinking that people at higher risk should be first to try an experimental vaccine is both false (because that is what human trials do) and morally deplorable, which is why health professionals would never defend such unethical practice.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

I agree, but only if the vaccine is absolutely safe.

Actually as long as the vaccine is safer than not being vaccinated it would still be better, there is nothing that is absolutely safe.

But nobody knows that yet.

Yeah, because that is what vaccines do, the idea that vaccines stop the infection is mistaken. What vaccines do is make the infection less dangerous and symptomatic. There is no vaccine made to stop getting infected, their purpose is to avoid getting sick.

Exactly! But I am surprised you would admit that.

One of the big selling points to get everyone vaccinated is to prevent us from infecting the vulnerable; that we would be selfish to not get the vaccine. But as you acknowledge, "what vaccines do is make the infection less dangerous and symptomatic". So it is perfectly rational and logical for only the vulnerable to get the vaccine. Why should healthy people risk getting a rushed experimental vaccine, just to reduce the chance of already very unlikely symptoms?

-4 ( +0 / -4 )

But nobody knows that yet.

If it is approved, that is a requisite.

Exactly! But I am surprised you would admit that.

Why would that be, your argument is completely different. Measles vaccine, hepA/B vaccine, HPV vaccine, Influenza vaccine etc. etc. All work by preventing vaccinated people from getting sick AND they also reduce very importantly the transmission of the infection to other people. There is no reason to assume at this point that vaccines against COVID-19 cannot fulfill this role also. None of the vaccine prevent infection of the vaccinated person, but all of them let the body abort the process before becoming infectious to other people.

In short, not preventing infection can still prevent the person from being infective.

It is not rational and logical for vulnerable people to be vaccinated first (they will not be) if the reason is not to expose others to risk. That is something only people without morals would think justifiable. Aslo, since completely healthy people can also develop serious complications and death from the infection, that is a risk well worth of reducing.

Fortunately the vaccine is not rushed, and follows a protocol already used for other vaccines that are in use today, even if you mistakenly believe the contrary, it is easy to prove that belief wrong.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

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