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In Washington, the Japanese art of cherry blossom viewing

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You should see Victoria's! I'd post a pic, but it would be boasting, and I don't know how to do that for JT. Chasing the sakura around the globe - wouldn't that be fun? Of course, we'd need our own private Mach3 SST, but what the hell, it's only money - a fleeting this-worldy thing, just like cherry blossoms.

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I went to DC last Saturday, however, only a handful of sakura trees were blossoming. Plan to come back next weekend, to attend the parade as well.

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In Washington, the Japanese art of cherry blossom viewing

Yamada, a Kyoto native who arrived here six months ago, describes the Japanese ritual of finding and staking one’s claim to the perfect spot for viewing the blossoms—and one essential item is a plastic tablecloth.

A plastic tablecloth, getting drunk with colleagues, and acting the fool is an "art"? Come on now.

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Another difference between here and there: So many people tromp around the trees around the tidal basin that the soil becomes hard as rock and the tree roots suffer. The result is the U.S. Park Service is contemplating fencing-off the more endangered trees to keep people from packing down the dirt. Good luck trying to set a tarp down in that kind of environment.

Last year's Winter was unusually warm, so the trees were all but finished with their blossoms by the time the Cerry Blossom Festival got into gear. This year with the cold weather the blossoms are late. We're supposed to get into the 80's in a few days, so hopefully that helps pop the flowers.

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In Washington, the Japanese art of cherry blossom viewing

art?? It's just a freakin picnic for crying out loud.

Yamada, a Kyoto native who arrived here six months ago, describes the Japanese ritual of finding and staking one’s claim to the perfect spot for viewing the blossoms—and one essential item is a plastic tablecloth.

Sounds fun, like finding and staking your claim in a long line of people for some kind of sweet or cake, or finding and staking your claim in line for the train, or inding and staking your claim for that precious seat on the train.

Boy, you have to appreciate that PLASTIC table cloth, (most likely made in China). That completes the "art". It's essential.

Unlike in Washington, the celebration in his homeland—referred to as “hanami” in Japanese—can sometimes involve leaving the office and heading to a nearby park with one’s work colleagues, the diplomat noted.

Unlike in Japan, in the U.S. it's usually not a treat to leave the office...on time. It's commonplace. In Yamada's homeland they slave away and work unpaid overtime until late at night, come in on Saturdays, etc. It's not strange, because everybody is doing that.

“Usually we send some junior staff or trainees to hold a spot. And they have to stay there and wait for us,” he said. “It’s not strange, because everybody is doing that, especially if it’s a very big and famous park.”

And this means having your junior staff and trainees do ALL the work, the women especially doing all of the preparation, cooking, and serving. Especially if it's a big and famous park. Let's enjoying crowds!

Yes, sounds like quite a unique"art".

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This probably sounds nitpicky but there really needs to be a distinction made between Washington state and Washington DC....

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@Supyman

I reckon the phrase "...the US capital...." (line 10) will do it for most people.

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I reckon the phrase "...the US capital...." (line 10) will do it for most people.

The first line should have Washington DC, instead of just WASHINGTON.

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The first line should have Washington DC, instead of just WASHINGTON.

??? Why? Is there a Tidal Basin in the State of Washington and does the State of Washington hold something called the "National Cherry Blossom Festival" as is reported in the article? No, they don't. Did the picture with accompanying caption noting that the picture was taken in Bethesda, Maryland cause you to be deceived that the article was about the State of Washington? No, it didn't. Anyone reading the article would clearly understand that the Washington being discussed was the ORIGINAL Washington not some copycat territory that came along half a century later.

Washington (or the District of Columbia) was organized in 1801. The Territory of Washington (subsequently the State of Washington) was created in 1853 and Statehood granted in 1889, yet in 1814 way before there was a Washington Territory, Britain committed the "Burning of Washington". Or do you insist that the historians change THAT name as well?

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@Fadamor

I only said that because most people (even Americans) don't know much about many states. I'm from the "copycat territory" Washington and every time I say that 95% of the time people assume DC. I admit I obviously missed the phrase "US capital" but in all honesty it would be nice if there was some sort of distinction made all around, such as using "the state of Washington" or "Washington State" and "Washington DC". Most people on the west coast I'm sure equate "Washington" with meaning the state rather than the capital.

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I agree with Fadamor that .. The first line should have Washington DC, instead of just WASHINGTON.. There is no reason not to add D.C. One shouldn't have to read the body of the message to clarify such a point. I am from Washington State. We do have a Sakura festival.

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typo - I meant should have been, not should have. Sorry.

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