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Japanese swoon over Canada's 'hunky PM' Trudeau

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Looking at Japan's fossilized geriatric "leaders" with bad comb overs, it's easy to see why women would swoon over the youthful Trudeau.

11 ( +14 / -3 )

No contest. Japan doesn't have any leaders who come near this guy

7 ( +11 / -4 )

an average guy among old farts. That's it.

13 ( +15 / -3 )

A clean-cut westerner will always do well in Japan. Get him drunk on shochu and you'll see another side of him ;)

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

When the APEC met in Manila just recently, Filipinas swoon over him too and Mexican Pres Nieto. He embodies youth, ideals and everything positive. lest we forget, he is the son of a previous PM. Very good upbringing! His wife is very lucky to have and Canada is luckier. There are only few times when you see wealth,beauty, intelligence, kindness, and humility in only one person. I just think, wherever he goes, women would swoon over him esp if he talk about more than politics like Science.

3 ( +5 / -2 )

@goldorak, he won't get drunk on shochu, he's got too much class for that. And as the article said, he used his own funds to stay in a traditional Japanese inn, and took the day off to take Sophie to Meiji. I only wish I didn't have to return to Canada a week earlier than his visit because I've met him here, in our own country, and it would have been quite a laugh to meet him in my second 'native land', for both of us, as well as his very considerate, and capable, wife.

4 ( +7 / -3 )

Handsome or not, I am uncomfortable that he, like Abe and many other Japanese PMs, is a hereditary politician. It just stinks up the place and hints that democracy is not really working as it should.

4 ( +10 / -6 )

I am uncomfortable that he, like Abe and many other Japanese PMs, is a hereditary politician. It just stinks up the place and hints that democracy is not really working as it should.

On the contrary, it does not show that democracy is not working at all. If people were denied based on their parentage, that would be an indicator that democracy isn't working.

While there can be problems with hereditary politicians, each needs to be judged on their own merits. Trudeau at least until now seems to be doing a stand-up job.

1 ( +7 / -6 )

Who said anything about denying people based on their parentage? You made that bit up, Strangerland. If we knew nothing about a society other than the family relationship between its leaders then I think you can see that hereditary leaders would probably show it was not a fair democracy. If everyone has the same chance of becoming the leader then it would be very unlikely in a country of millions that a democracy would throw up close relatives as leaders. Monarchies, yes; dictatorships, yes; plutocracies, yes; oligarchies, yes. In addition, the job he is doing - good or bad - is irrelevant to the perception hereditary politicians cause; which is to say, "Hey, my chance of being leader seems limited by the fact I am not connected by family to a former politician." The existence of so many hereditary politicians in Japan is not an indicator of a healthy democracy, even if you think some might do a good job. Just like the fact that so many British politicians attended the right schools shows it is not democratic either. As a firm believer in democracy I think we are right to be suspicious when names or backgrounds start repeating in our leadership.

6 ( +6 / -0 )

Who said anything about denying people based on their parentage?

As you said:

I am uncomfortable that he... is a hereditary politician. It... hints that democracy is not really working as it should.

If hereditary politicians are an indicator that democracy is not working as it should, then to remove this issue in order for democracy to work 'as it should', the right to run for leader would have to be removed.

You may not have said it in so many words, but your comments pointed to the necessity of denying hereditary politicians in order for democracy to work 'as it should'.

If everyone has the same chance of becoming the leader then it would be very unlikely in a country of millions that a democracy would throw up close relatives as leaders.

Really? The son of a leader is going to grow up with a leader as a role model, learning lessons first hand from a leader. This is going to put them in a better position to become a leader themselves, and increase the likelihood of their becoming one.

-6 ( +2 / -8 )

The son of a leader is going to grow up with a leader as a role model, learning lessons first hand from a leader. This is going to put them in a better position to become a leader themselves, and increase the likelihood of their becoming one.

Yeah, just like Dubya.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

No, I think your reasoning there is a little off. It is just that chance alone would be unlikely to throw up relatives as leaders, revealing something is probably askew, which is not to say relatives should be denied. But, ok, Strangerland, I think you make your point eloquently that heredity and the "right home background" can be for you a valid reason for selecting leaders. Some schools in the UK also claim to instil leadership too and maybe they do and some will doff their caps to people who attended them.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

It is just that chance alone would be unlikely to throw up relatives as leaders

But it's not based on chance alone. It's based on environment, qualifications, financial status, and more.

-4 ( +2 / -6 )

Might be hunky, but with his raven tattoo,no onsen in Japan would let him in.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

@goldorak, he won't get drunk on shochu, he's got too much class for that.

Agree trevor. tongue was firmly planted in cheek in my initial comment (which has now been removed by jt mods, fair enough).

I know little about Trudeau but everything I do read or see about him is positive and he also seems to be popular with both anglos and francophone Canadians. Nice couple indeed.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Might be hunky, but with his raven tattoo,no onsen in Japan would let him in.

Sure they would. I've been to lots of onsen with my tattoos. In fact, I've never been asked to leave an onsen at a ryokan. It's only the higaeri onsen, and sento, that will say anything.

-3 ( +2 / -5 )

I would love to say keep him, but I'm about ot come back in Japan.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

All show,no go !

0 ( +4 / -4 )

This article has nothing whatsoever to do with politics, and everything to do with the shallow cult of celebrity worship that is the stock in trade of the Japanese popular media.

5 ( +5 / -0 )

I think Shinzo Abe is handsome :)

0 ( +2 / -2 )

"the premier, commenting on the “cool” tattoo of a raven on his left arm." hang on, I thought that the Japanese disliked Tatoos? due to there connections with well known gangs, is the press saying its ok now as he's a hunky prime minister from Canada?

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Well, if they were swooning over that gorilla a while back, I'd hope an attractive man with power and money would do it for them.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

If hereditary politicians are an indicator that democracy is not working

It is. That shows that even for top office, the system favors heritage over skills. I don't want to change the laws about who can run. I want laws to be used to fight the corruption and nepotism that create phenomenom. Rich families indirectly buy their kid's entrance to good schools, into good careers.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Moon raker: "I am uncomfortable that he, like Abe and many other Japanese PMs, is a hereditary politician."

Ridiculous. He earned his passage to leadership, unlike many politicians or business people here and in other nations, he did not 'inherit' it. He's not only a good politician, but has a solid background in other fields as well, like physics. I can't think of any other people in the nation (Canada) that became PM after their father (or mother, in Campbell's case), so it is a first and not unlike Japan at all.

In any case, the guy can do no wrong so far (except haters would say he has). He's sociable, encourages people to get along (instead of promoting fear and intolerance, as the former PM did), pays his own way, and more.

Now, if people at the gym or what have you would just stop patting ME on the back and congratulating me for how handsome Trudeau is, like I had something to do with it, that would be great. Haha.

coskuri: "I want laws to be used to fight the corruption and nepotism that create phenomenon."

So, you want laws that don't allow talented people, in Trudeau's case, to become something great just because a parent did. That's not democracy, son, that's dictatorship. They should not be allowed if they do not have the skills or qualifications, but they should not be limited when they do.

"Rich families indirectly buy their kid's entrance to good schools, into good careers."

I'm not rich by any means, and I don't disagree with you per se, but should they not be permitted to go to good schools if they have money? Would YOU not allow your kid to go to the best school if you had the money to put him/her into it simply because you have that money and others don't? Be honest.

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

It seems many readers on JT are also blinded by his looks.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

I hope Trudeau does a good job (it's a bit early to judge). That's not only about him. I don't think being a daughter of JFK qualifies to be a diplomat. I still hope she does a good job. That's not the biggest issue on earth or in Canadia , but that's so 18th century...

should they not be permitted to go to good schools if they have money?

Schools should ignore who has money and powerful acquaintances, that's all that I ask. That's not always as obvious as with the daughter of Obama, but the selection takes into account social status and background. So no, if people get quickly to the top, that's not just because "father was a role model". You have great parents in all backgrounds, smart kids everywhere. But you can be the best of your class all your life, as a ghetto kid, you have zero chance to be offered an internship in a ministery or a huge corp... while the youth in those internships got them even if they are mediocre students, because their parents gave a phone call to old buddies in management positions.

Would YOU not allow your kid to go to the best school .... Be honest.

To be honest, when I was a 14 yr old airhead, I was mad at my Dad when he said he preferred not allowing ME... I was finding out the lack of fairness of the system and discovering the possibility of buying myself a 1st class ticket. My Dad could pay so I'd move into the good city, get into the good school, then with my grades, I'd easily enter the best uni. I was interested in politics and cheating that way works, a school mate that did it has been minister twice already and now she is MP (more difficult than minister as you can't bribe all electors). I told Dad he could even have just advanced the money as later, being rich, I would repay.

because you have that money and others don't?

Yes, Dad asked me that. And he mentionned my dear friends (boat peoples and all) facing discrimination in society, and the migrant kids I was helping with homework. Then, after thinking about it , I agreed he was right. I'm not like that. I've quickly lost interest in politics when I found that was exclusively made by people playing Monopoly.

So, you want laws that don't allow talented people, in Trudeau's case, to become something great just because a parent did.

Is having a dead famous father the talent ? People were ready to vote for Pierre Trudeau's hologram but as the machine was not fully developped and a son was available...

He's sociable, encourages people to get along, pays his own way, and more.

OK. Seriously, nearly all the Canadian eikaiwa teachers are sociable, for peace and love, they pay their drinks, they shower you with mapple syrup, they have at least the degrees and work experience of Trudeau Junior. Some are better looking and elegant. Even if Trudeau's current style adviser does great. Hopefully he has good advisers for doing his job too.

I can't think of any other people in the nation (Canada) that became PM after their father

Elizabeth II. Daughter of... check.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Of course offspring of politician have a big advantage when it comes to them becoming politicians themselves. If Mum or Dad knows the ins and outs of being a politician, a son or daughter is going to get some pretty useful insights. Is it really any different from a teacher's son or daughter also becoming a teacher?

1 ( +1 / -0 )

It seems many readers on JT are also blinded by his looks.

He does not compute with me.

J (LUNA SEA bassist) is more of a hunk.

http://lpt.c.yimg.jp/im_siggRZGTNdS8ubJMMQIhXZzEmg---x900-y674-q90/amd/20160312-00010000-trendnewsn-009-view.jpg

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Of course offspring of politician have a big advantage when it comes to them becoming politicians themselves. Is it really any different from a teacher's son or daughter also becoming a teacher?

Yes. But it's not different from succeding to your father as don of a mafia.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

This article is comparing Briber to Justin Trudeau.... is this suggestion they are both same oriented one out of closet and the other still in the closet.... .

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

"the 44-year-old PM"

He looks more like 24.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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