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Japan's 'omiyage' culture

54 Comments
By Michelle

Tourist shops everywhere in Japan are filled with colorful boxes of local sweets that are perfectly portioned for sharing. These are "omiyage." At work, it’s almost expected that you bring back a box of omiyage filled with a specialty product from the area your business trip took place in, and friends and family often purchase omiyage for those who weren’t able to make the trip. Many argue that giving omiyage is a distinctly Japanese custom. Yuichiro Suzuki, author of Omiyage and the Railway, explains in an interview with Yahoo! Japan.

Don’t they have omiyage abroad?

Omiyage is translated as “souvenir” in English, but the two are a little different. A souvenir is something that the person who is doing the traveling buys for him/herself to remember the trip. In Europe and the United States, train station and airport stores are filled with key chains and other non-food items for this purpose. But Japanese omiyage typically consists of food items produced in the area the trip was taken in. Also, omiyage is not intended to be consumed by the traveler and is instead given out to coworkers or friends.

But what about chocolate-covered macadamia nuts in Hawaii?

These were created by Japanese-Americans who were most likely influenced by Japanese omiyage culture. France also has Mont Saint-Michel cookies which are popularly purchased for the same purpose as omiyage, but these are exceptions. The amount of food-related omiyage in Western souvenir shops is overwhelmingly low compared to shops in Japan.

But there are many types of candies and foods sold at tourist spots in China and South Korea.

I agree that there are. But in Japan, omiyage is associated with the history of a specific region, for example, Ise City’s Akafuku rice crackers or Gunma Prefecture’s famous Kusatsu Onsen mochi. In general, this is not true of omiyage elsewhere.

So when was omiyage first seen in Japan?

The origin of omiyage is unclear, but it is thought that the custom began in association with sacred pilgrimages. Those who visited Shinto shrines were expected to bring back evidence of the pilgrimage to their families in the form of charms, rice wine cups, or other religiously significant items. It was thought that the protection granted to pilgrims would be transferred to whoever received the items brought back from the sacred trip. This is said to be the beginning of omiyage.

So at that time, manju (steamed yeast buns with filling) and other foods that are commonly purchased as omiyage today didn’t exist?

Back then, food preservation techniques were limited and people traveled by foot so they could only carry light items such as medicine, money, and ear picks. There was only room for the essentials.

Does that mean that the types of food products increased once the railway system was built?

That’s right. For example, Shizuoku Prefecture’s Abekawa mochi originated in a small tea house next to Abekawa River. After the development of the railway system, "gyuhi," a sugary gel confectionery, was made instead of mochi because it lasts longer and can be taken on long trips. At first, many people complained about this new style of Abekawa mochi, but it eventually became known as a specialty product associated with the area.

In your book, you mention that specialty regional foods such as Akafuku mochi in Ise or millet dumplings in Okayama Prefecture were not popular before the Edo period, but have been widely accepted since modern times.

Omiyage culture has been around for a long time, but it’s because of institutions that support the modern state such as the railroad, army, and imperial house that Japanese people have come to have a deep relationship with omiyage.

Is this type of research about omiyage popular?

Research concerning culture anthropology is progressing, but only a handful of people are studying how omiyage came into existence. It’s possible that the majority of those researching Japanese history don’t like sweets.

—————————– Suzuki makes some interesting points when distinguishing the difference between Western souvenirs and Japanese omiyage. Do you agree that the two are different? Is the purchasing and giving of omiyage a distinctly Japanese custom?

Source: Yahoo! Japan

Read more stories from RocketNews24. -- Mochi + Cherry Tomato? New Spingtime Specialty Out Of Fukoka Is Sweet And Sour Treat -- Here, Have Some Chocolate Cow Poop Mochi From Hokkaido -- Hoping to Put the “Osaka Burger” on the Map!

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54 Comments
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Some points are similar, others are not so (who'd have thought it?). In my experience as a child, we always bought souvenirs for ourselves as well as others - if you want to distinguish the naming of these gifts, feel free. In the UK there are a variety of edible souvenirs depending on the area/type of region, as well as many more traditional products that people buy to give on return home. The main difference is possibly the 'degree of obligation' as to whether you have to buy souvenirs or not.

2 ( +5 / -3 )

So "omiyage" absolutely doesn't translate as "souvenir" in English. Been telling my students for years : (

4 ( +5 / -1 )

Yes, other people in other countries, bring back "souvenirs" from their trips. This is normal human behavior.

Of course, Japan needs to be special, so they ALWAYS bring back souvenirs and make sure they give them to EVERYBODY. As a result, the "souvenir" is NOT personal, and usually not even reflective of where they went. And everybody has to outdo each other pretending that cookie is extra special and "oishii!"

And many cases, people leave City X to visit City Y, and then come back and buy their 'souvenirs" from City X anyhow.

Ridiculous.

2 ( +9 / -7 )

"But what about chocolate-covered macadamia nuts in Hawaii?"

You have to witness the Japanese buying huge amounts of this in Honolulu. In some cases they have to ship it separately.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

just buy them in Tokyo station or Narita after your arrival. Not having the headaches of going to work without one makes it worth the extra expense

2 ( +5 / -3 )

The closest thing I've seen to omiyage concept here in the US are the microbreweries. Getting wasted across America has never been so much fun.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

Interesting, uniquely unique Japan...ad nauseam. My father traveled globally for work for 2 decades and always brought us back something from those places, sometimes candy or food, sometimes other gift / souvenir thingys. When younger, we loved the chocolate from Belgium or Switzerland the most. What is clearly different here in Japan is that there is a sense of obligation to bring things to your office and co-workers, besides family. It can get ridiculous and cause stress at the end of a trip.

6 ( +10 / -4 )

All the different omiyage are cool. some years back it was prettuy common to bring back cigarettes or tinned/preserved food as omiyage, but as Japan has gotten richer so these special omiyage have become ubiquitous.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

What is "famous" mean?

I'm a Japanese, but I have never known Gunma Prefecture’s "famous" Kusatsu Onsen mochi before I have read today's article!

Many foreigner people buy gifts for a family member and good friend if they visit to oversea, or another place in a home country. For example, when I went to England, there are many stores with "Blackpool Rock" of course in Blackpool. It's very delicious omiyage, but no Japanese in Blackpool!

Buying for everyone because it's like a duty (not because it's a people I like and want to buy a gift for) is unique Japanese way I think. Foreigner people buy because they like the people they give a gift.

2 ( +6 / -4 )

@wareware

...no Japanese in Blackpool!

You'd think so, but it's hugely popular with the older generation as the host of the annual World Ballroom Dancing Championship, held at Blackpool Tower. All the Japanese "social dancers" want to visit. Pity the Town itself is such a heroin-filled pit....

3 ( +4 / -1 )

When I visit England, I go onto the Harrod's website about ten days before I'm due back in Japan and order all my omiyage to be delivered to my home in Japan. A tad expensive, but it's great to be able to enjoy a quiet beer at the airport instead of running around like a lunatic buying boxes of chocolates and struggling with them on the plane.

3 ( +2 / -0 )

I can live without omiyage.

At my place of work, omiyage is handed out almist daily. Went to southern Japan? Omiyage. Was hospitalized for a while an this "inconvenienced" your co-workers? Omiyage. Went to Europe? Omiyage. Quitting job? Omiyage.

Most of this stuff is rather tasteless, overpacked, overpriced junk. There is nothing unique about it at all. Instead, it's the tiresome giri-culture showing fake gratitude for whatever little reason. You give this stuff, not because you care about people, but because you feel obligated. Most people do it because everybody else does it. It seems to reflect Japanese society pretty well. :-|

0 ( +5 / -5 )

At first I hated the omiyage culture but now I find that I spend a good amount of time buying stuff for people when I travel. I guess I don't really hate it.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

My partner teaches retired people at a community centre and comes home with bags of cakes, tea, sweets, biscuits etc. from their many trips in Japan and abroad. I remember custard sponge cakes from Miyagi, Scottish shortbread and a cup of Twinnings tea ( I'd never heard of it before coming to Japan ). I'm not sure if its a genuine display of gratitude or just 'giri', but it can be a nice way to share a little happiness.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Obligatory omiyage says it all. No real thought - soooo unique.

-1 ( +3 / -4 )

"Japanese people have come to have a deep relationship with omiyage."

What tosh!! Instead of trying to sell us the profundity of it all, you could just say, "Japanese habitually buy omiyage".

And how does the army or the "imperial" house affect this "deep relationship"?

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

Heart warming to see so many foreigners broadening their horizons while living overseas.

Seriously, why do you bother to travel in the first place? To amaze friends and family back home with your "adventures"?

-3 ( +4 / -7 )

Most of the souvenir stuff here is GOMI-yage in my opinion.

2 ( +4 / -2 )

Can you perhaps tell us, ReformedBasher, how your horizons have been broadened by omiyage and the habit of buying them? I may have missed something in my travels, for sure.

0 ( +4 / -4 )

ReformedBasher: Heart warming to see so many foreigners broadening their horizons while living overseas.

It seems to me that posters here have broadened their horizons quite a bit. They've learned enough about Japanese culture to realize that, for the most part, omiyage is useless crap, given out of a sense of obligation rather than because you love or even like the recipient. Is it only considered broadening ones horizons if you wear rose-colored cultural glasses forever?

-1 ( +3 / -4 )

We are currently visiting Japan and I found it amusing to see that the 'Yokohama gentei Kit Kat' at Shin Yokohama station is made in Yamaguchi..

I too was amused to see the macadamia chocs and Tim Tams etc at Narita Airport...it seems it is more of an obligatory gift to compensate the other party for missing out onall the fun you have had...

1 ( +1 / -0 )

If all cultures were the same, we'd all might as well stay at home. What a frigging bore.

As for my previous comment, which I do not retract or defend in any way, why do "we" do things back at home that probably make no sense to others? Is "our" culture so flawless that it is beyond question?

By the way, I don't wear rose-coloured glasses. Mine are sakura-coloured.

2 ( +6 / -4 )

It seems to me that posters here have broadened their horizons quite a bit.

Really? Please explain.

Okay, for the sake of comparison, and to amuse myself, shall we compare the gift giving of Christmas presents to everybody? Or perhaps office cards and goodbye cards to people leaving back home? Because I sure didn't like spending money or writing some blurb, especially in the case of the person in question was somebody I didn't like. Um, but it's okay to waffle on about how insincere White Day and omiyage are, right?

In fact, pointless ceremony, unwanted gift-giving, and keeping-up-with-the-Jones nonsense increased back home while I was away. But I guess your own tunnel vision won't allow any objective criticism of the land of milk and honey that you sprang from.

As for me, I'm no gourmet, but food miyage gets eaten. Sometimes I even like it. Wish I could get Kumamoto ramen here in Kansai. (Anyone know somewhere?)

2 ( +5 / -3 )

Ambrosia - that's exactly what I'm thinking! Only obligation, no real feeling. Exactly useless. For example, in my office someone go to a onsen. I don't like her, she don't like me. Onsen is not so special, I think. Then Monday morning, she gives a shrimp cookie in the office. Why I must say, "Oh thank you for shrimp cookie! Really you are considering me!"

Of course she is not considering me. She considers only she must buy some cheap cookie. It's exactly pantomime. Much better to buy a gift if you like a someone. That has a meaning, I think. Must buy a gift because same room is exactly no meaning. Maybe it's unique only Japanese can bother such pantomime. I want to say, "please don't buy shrimp cookie to me! I don't want a stinky shrimp breath!"

2 ( +7 / -5 )

Why I get a thumb down if I say honestly?

0 ( +4 / -4 )

warewarenihongin, very interesting that you can see this for what it is. Japan has a great culture in some ways, but with regard to omiage, you are right when you say that it is pure theatre and not in the least bit genuine. When I go somewhere, I am obliged to buy gifts for people in my office. They all do the same. They don't particularly like me and I don't particularly like them. This is really little more than a procedure that people willingly go along with, just like pretending to be busy all day or deliberately working unnecessary overtime hours. Personally, I don't want to eat senbe or manju etc, which is about all they ever buy. Without this omiage pantomime, these kinds of foods would all but disappear. Next time I go away I am not buying any omiage. I am through with this sort of silly pretense. I would be looking forward to the reaction, but there won't be one. Most of my colleagues will probably be way too busy staring blankly at Excel sheets to even notice.

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

Goodness, brother Reformed, you really do have those sakura colored glasses on, don't you now?

Nobody here ever made the case that insincere gift- or knick-knack giving was OK back in the Motherland. The problem with much of this BS "gift"-exchange here is it is made under the pretense of beautiful friendship and c a r i n g, kizuna or what have you, when there are no true feelings involved. At least that's what I find disturbing.

I agree with you that the world would be a boring place if it was the same everywhere but we have to be able to call a spade a spade, right? Some Japanese customs, like the constant handing-over-envelopes-with-money at whatever ceremony you attend, only to have the receiver bring you another envelope or gift next event, are quite stupid. It's the dance of appearance and of those who cannot bring themselves to say "enough of this old-fashioned BS.

Omiyage is one of those, almost forced, shows of caring. We could all do without that.

-4 ( +4 / -8 )

I see it as one of the awesomely unique points of Japan. There's just so much diversity in the cuisine / local snacks that you just want to try everything & also share it with your friends. It's infectious & expensive - but it keeps the regional areas ticking along and that's important.

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

We always get the manju at Asakusa & give them to freinds & family .It's most delicious !

0 ( +2 / -2 )

yes.. it's uniquely unique about unique Japan. Stop it already!! Just another article trying to point how special and unique Japanese "culture" is

2 ( +4 / -2 )

Knox, do not call other cultures stupid. I was unaccustomed to the culture of giving gifts of money for things like having a baby, moving into a new house, etc. My wife's friends and relatives obviously care about us, not to mention the extra money could not have come at a better time. Choosing what okaeshi to give them was fun and they enjoyed our return gifts. I have come to love the gift giving culture. It's a shame you can only see things from the point of view of the place you were brought up.

0 ( +3 / -3 )

@Knox Harrington

Better to enjoy where I live, than complain every day.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

Dear Mr. Saxon Salute

It's exactly as you say. We Japanese often say Omiyage is "to make good relationsip" but it's nonsense, I think. Relationsip is nothing! Only Silence and sometimes correct phrase, "yoroshiku onegai shimasu", etc. No relationship, just like a robot.

One lady in my office goes to Disneyland by alone. Only one day, and she comes back to office next day with omiyage for pretend thank you because we supported her. I want to say, "Nobody needs supporting your job - you do no job! Only pretending a work! And forties lady, going to Disney by alone? Aren't you shame? You should grow up, I think! I don't want a stupid Minnie biscuit! I want you do a job!"

Of course I don't say! Maybe one day...

But really it is very strange. If you like a someone, please buy a gift from a heart. It is so touching I think! However, if only for custom, with no heartfulness, it is absolutely no meaning. Better not to buy, I think.

-1 ( +4 / -5 )

I like the concept of co-workers bringing home some sweets to munch on. In fact, I look forward to them depending on where they went. I buy them simply as a sign of appreciation for "picking up the slack" while I was out of the office.

No harm, really. Lighten up.

2 ( +6 / -4 )

I haven't lived in the U.K. for nearly 40 years, and I can't say whether this custom continues or not, but we certainly used to have omiyage. They were called souvenirs, but, as the author points out, a souvenir is something to remember your trip by, souvenir being the French word for remember.

Usually they were sticks of "rock." This was sugar, white on the inside and red on the outside, in the shape of a stick or rod, with the name of the place in letters that go, magically, through the stick from the top to the bottom. Typically it would be Brighton or Blackpool.

There were coronation mugs, when a king or queen was crowned, although these were not given away, as I recall.

The custom probably goes back a long way.

I believe the Romans had "memorabilia," and if they did, probably the ancient Greeks did, the Egyptians and the Assyrians before them.

Omiyage are not Japan only. I think they are part of human nature. Wanting your friends and family to share the joy that you have.

1 ( +4 / -3 )

Reformedbasher: Okay, for the sake of comparison, and to amuse myself, shall we compare the gift giving of Christmas presents to everybody? But I guess your own tunnel vision won't allow any objective criticism of the land of milk and honey that you sprang from

Boo hoo! Take it up with the writer for suggesting that this is yet another "unique" aspect to Japanese culture rather than with posters who don't like this aspect of the culture. And by the way, since when does not like a certain aspect mean one has tunnel vision and why are you any different when you defend everything about Japan, no matter how stupid it is? If you find it to be the land of milk and honey, that's fine for you. If others find it to be less than perfect and far from bad, that's their option too. There's no need for you to get your knickers in such a twist about what other people think.

If the country you go back home to is the U.S. then you know darn well that there is no shortage of criticism coming from Americans about America so it's beyond me why you're so sensitive about Japan being criticized from time to time and why you even bother reading this site if it tips you over the edge the way it seems to. Don't even try and throw the old "we're guests here" nonsense either. That argument has been dissected ad infinitum.

-2 ( +2 / -4 )

kickboard: Knox, do not call other cultures stupid

Did we read the same post? Knox was quite clear about his / her choice of words and never said Japanese culture was stupid but that "some" aspects of it were. The last I checked neither Japan nor any other culture was perfect or devoid of stupid things.

Unless you're the cultural critiquing police you have no right to be telling others what they can and can't criticize. If you can't take a little criticism about certain things regarding Japan then I politely suggest you stay off of this site because it's just going to work you up.

-2 ( +2 / -4 )

I once gave frozen razberries in heavy juice over icecream to one family and it knocked their socks off...

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Wasn't Akafuku in the news a few years ago for selling their re-labelled mochi past the sell-by date? Then, once they had pronounced their humble apologies and bowed profusely and vowed to regain "understanding", maybe even voluntarily shut their doors for a while, while suffering no fines, I believe, they had lines of people waiting for their post-self-flagellation products. It seems the omiyage buyers were desperate and prepared to forgive them very quickly. Now that says something about omiyage buying, though I am not sure what.

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

@Ambrosia

Boo hoo?

Um, who are the ones complaining about the culture? What's wrong? Not what you expected?

Let's vent our frustrations online! That'll make it all better!

If the country you go back home to is the U.S. then you know darn well that there is no shortage of criticism coming from Americans about America so it's beyond me why you're so sensitive about Japan being criticized from time to time and why you even bother reading this site if it tips you over the edge the way it seems to.

Not American. Feel free to rant on though.

As for being "sensitive" or "tipped over the edge", again, I'm not the one with the problem here. May I remind you that people back home that complain non-stop are called losers by people in their own country. I'm merely extending you that same courtesy.

Don't even try and throw the old "we're guests here" nonsense either.

How is it "nonsense"? Should the entire country change it's ways to suit the tastes of a few disgruntled snowflakes?

0 ( +2 / -2 )

I don't feel anyone should feel obligated to give someone a gift, period. If you don't like someone and don't want to give someone a gift, don't waste your money. Buy something you like or need. If you really want to buy something for someone, buy for someone you actually like. Otherwise, all this is like slapping someone in the face with a smile.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

@ReformedBasher.

Essentially the article is about the specialness of omiyage in Japan compared to the rest of the world. It also states that there is some great profundity to the whole business with an implication that there is thoughtfulness and caring behind the motives for buying omiyage. Now these can be considered as contentious theses (and like much of what passes for "comparative culture" seem to start from a position of asserting the specialness of Japan). And those who disagree with the theses are not necessarily dissing Japan. Those who want to take issue with the points made are also not necessarily losers either, as they would not be for disagreeing with a custom or policy in their own countries.

0 ( +3 / -3 )

In my office, nobody does this ridiculous omiyage routine. We all simply decided not to. I am the only NJ among us 15 traders.

Why don't posters give the poster ReformedBasher some slack? When you are new to Japan, everything is wonderful. It takes time to discern the reality of situations.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

@Moonraker

Thank you for your reply. I think we can agree to be fair there will be some who appreciate gifts and those who don't, both foreign and native. I do find it silly though to portray the custom as some kind of robotic practice.

As for me, I always appreciate omiyage as mentioned above. In some way, a bit more thought goes into it than Christmas presents and Easter eggs - it's not set in stone as much that you have to buy something.

If I had more money, I'd do it more myself. As it is, I and my co-workers buy, and sometimes cook, each other treats on occasion. As you can guess, we get on fine.

Recall there were morning teas where I worked overseas. Not everybody liked each other but everybody attended regardless.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

Wasn't Akafuku in the news a few years ago for selling their re-labelled mochi past the sell-by date?

Yes, and for freezing them as well. I had already stopped buying them by then. Our family used to like them, but sometime in the late 90s they started putting much less bean paste on the top, and they just didn't taste as good as they used to. One time the mochi was tough, and I just never bought them again.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

When I first came to Japan I was surprised with the numbers of omiyage people bought and did not understand the meaning of buyng them.

After having worked with my colleagues for some time, I became to appreciate their thoughtfulness and willingness to help one another when work calls for it. I like buying omiyage for them and I try to choose omiyage which I know they would enjoy. I do it because I feel grateful to them for being understanding and helpful to me and because I know that they (just as I do) usually look forward to the sweets.

And no, I do not wear pink glasses. It does not take too much to see that Japanese people do care - just they do not show it so openly as we westerners do.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

ReformedBasher: Um, who are the ones complaining about the culture? What's wrong? Not what you expected?

Personally I had no real expectations when I first arrived here. Most things I find great, which is why I've stayed so long. Some things I don't like. That's pretty much like every place in the world, isn't it? And again, complaining about one particular point is hardly worth your getting upset about it.

Not American. Feel free to rant on though

Did you notice the "if" in the sentence? Apparently not, nor do you seem too clued in to what the word "rant" means.

May I remind you that people back home that complain non-stop are called losers by people in their own country. I'm merely extending you that same courtesy.

Complaining nonstop? So disliking one particular thing is complaining nonstop? No place is perfect, including this one. Where I'm from, blindly defending any one place would define someone as a loser, so consider the courtesy returned.

How is it "nonsense"? Should the entire country change it's ways to suit the tastes of a few disgruntled snowflakes?

Losers? Snowflakes? Oh what clever repartee! The "nonsense" comment was directed at any potential claims that those of us who are not Japanese are "guests" here. As for whether or not Japan should change things to suit the people who don't like them, where did I suggest that? I can live with my feeling that omiyage are mostly an obligatory, waste of money and I'm okay with that. I accept them graciously because it's part of the game but that in no way changes how I feel about them.

You're so busy being defensive about every perceived slight you think Japan has received that you read far too much into what are mostly just comments about particular issues. I don't really imagine anyone here agitating for a boycott on omiyage so don't let it keep you up at night. That's my little omiyage to you.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

@Ambrosia

Don't think of my comments as a personal attack on you. I'm just tired of people who miss the entire point of making plans to travel abroad and then complain about it. If I heard a Japanese national making stupid comments overseas, I'd be just as critical.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

In this article, it says there are the two differences between omiyage and souvenior. One is that Japanese omiyage is associated with regional. The second one is that the degree of purchasing for others. But after reading comments it is similar. I guess that the only one difference is that Japanese omiyage is the most characteristic all over the world.

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

this article was too long, can't read that much. Anyway. I like receiving presents.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

I like this article very much. it could be much longer. Very well done and yes it is very Japanese. And I liked that last comment ..it was very observant and I think probably quite right. :)

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

ReformedBasher: @Ambrosia Don't think of my comments as a personal attack on you.

If you don't want people to take your comments personally then don't infer that they are losers in your posts.

I'm just tired of people who miss the entire point of making plans to travel abroad and then complain about it.

From most of the posters' comments, I'd say that they are generally long-term Japan residents of Japan and not just "travelers". And, if they are long-term residents they probably like far more about Japan than they dislike.

If I heard a Japanese national making stupid comments overseas, I'd be just as critical.

Just because people don't agree with you, what you like and don't like, doesn't mean their comments are stupid. Try to be a little more open-minded and lighten up. Many people use anonymous boards like this as a way to vent frustrations in a manner that is pretty harmless. It's far better that they say exactly how they feel here rather than in front of Japanese who might be offended and with whom their relationships might be irreparably damaged. If you can't understand that life - anywhere - can be frustrating and that as non-Japanese in Japan any criticism, no matter how slight, is usually received very negatively then you are more oblivious than I thought you were.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Readers, please cut out the bickering.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Most japanese I know detest having to buy souvenirs for everyone. I guess it keeps a lot of people in jobs in the packaged junk-food industry in Japan! BTW - you simply can't beat dark chocolate macadamias - I always bring back half a suitcase full from hawaii - for MYSELF!

1 ( +1 / -0 )

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