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Diet member wants Japan to get with it on tattooing

53 Comments

Due mainly to the strong but mostly erroneous association between inked skin and the criminal underworld, Japan has a well-deserved reputation as a tattoo unfriendly country. It is hardly surprising, therefore, that tattooing has managed to attract few vocal supporters in the Diet.

One exception, reports Spa! (May 31), is Akihiro Hatsushika, a 47-year-old member of the lower house from Tokyo. During a Diet session, Hatsushika fired questions at Health, Labor and Welfare minister at Yasuhisa Shiozaki concerning what he sees as outdated laws concerning tattooing.

Hatsushika raised the matter of Taiki Masuda, a tattoo artist in Osaka who was indicted on charges of having violated the Medical Practioners' Act of 1948, which requires people who stick needles into the skin of living humans to have a medical license.

Charges against Masuda were filed at the behest of bureaucrats in Shiozaki's ministry.

"The artist couldn't make sense out what procedures he is required to take in order to perform his work, and was told that it can only be done by a medical doctor," Hatsushika complained. "This kind of harassment constitutes arrogance on the part of the bureaucracy. And what's more, the man has been recognized as a practitioner of his profession for decades, but now he's been put out of business by one notification from the ministry."

It goes without saying, Spa! notes, that no other country in the world requires a tattoo artist to hold a medical license. In most cases, a tattoo emporium can be opened by application for a business license, and government oversight is fairly simple.

So Hatsushika, saying that "now is the only chance to get it done," is advocating revisions in the law. His rationale is that "In the run-up to the 2020 Olympics, Japan is inviting more and more foreigners. If, for example, an athlete like (Argentinian soccer superstar) Lionel Messi attempts to enter an 'onsen' (hot spring bath) here, will we turn him away on account of his tattoos? To insist he conceal them all would probably require him to wear a wet suit. Japan would be made a worldwide laughing stock."

Actually, Spa! notes, numerous athletes and artists bearing tattoos visit Japan. Are they refused service when they enter a sauna or 'onsen'?

"Here's Japan, trying to establish itself as a major tourist destination and then it goes so far as to tell tattooed visitors that they can't enter one of the country's biggest attractions? That's plain stupid!" Hatsushika went on. "You see today's young stars in sports like soccer and basketball wearing tattoos, and more fans are influenced to get them too. So the notion that 'tattoos have a bad image due to their association with criminal syndicates' no longer applies."

With the Olympics just four years off, Hatsushika insists now is right time for Japan to engage in a national debate on the pros and cons of tattooing.

"The issue is really part of 'daibaashiti' (diversity)," he remarked. "I suppose our travel industry is also embarrassed that although so many inbound visitors are coming, they're being told they won't be allowed to enter a public bath or 'onsen.' It's stupid -- akin to asking the travel agencies to engage in self-strangulation."

Hatsushika added that he is seeking out fellow Diet members for a "tattoo study group" that may propose legislation to make Japan more in tune with the times.

Spa! quotes an activist as saying 60 to 80% of patrons at Japan's tattoo parlors are visitors from abroad, some who come multiple times, who appreciate the well developed skills of the artists here. To fund its activities, the group is selling original T-shirts in international sizes for a donation of 5,000 yen plus shipping.

Those wishing to sign the petition (or buy a T-shirt) can visit the English site "Save Tattooing" (http://savetattooing.org).

© Japan Today

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53 Comments
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Japan would be made a worldwide laughing stock.”

Believe me there are already people from all over the world laughing at Japan regarding this issue. It is good however to see someone in the Diet taking up this cause and making it an issue prior to the Olympics.

About damn time!

19 ( +25 / -6 )

Japan's stigma with tattooing should not be a surprise to anyone who has an intermediate level of understanding of Japanese culture. If you go back 60-70 years in western cultures, tattoos had the same stigma of being only for criminals. Most aspects of Japanese culture is two generations behind the rest of the world, so why should tattoos be any different? However, their stance is creating a new generation of 'wanna be' yaks who get tattoos to wear as tough stickers. Personally, I don't like tattoos, especially on women, but that is my preference. Japan is in for a big shock when the Olympics come with all the tattooed foreigners invading Japan.

-4 ( +9 / -13 )

Kudos to you sir. It's not just about tattoos people, it's about respect and learning to live and accept others. No need to have draconian rules that inspire and promote discrimination.

18 ( +19 / -1 )

Hatsushika fired questions at Health, Labor and Welfare minister at Yasuhisa Shiozaki concerning what he sees as outdated laws concerning tattooing.

Oh boy, there are so many outdated laws, beliefs & customs here that one doesn't even know where to start. Wasn't there a bar owner, recently, who was sued because his customers were dancing?? He won the case, but still . . . it went to a court.

Waste of time and paperwork.

5 ( +7 / -2 )

Funny how some people in Japan think that it's okay to demand tourists to act, behave and understand Japanese culture before visiting Japan. These people seem to have the same level of intelligent as the latest image recognition algorithm, they categorize butterfly tattoos in the same category as yakuza's tattoo.

16 ( +18 / -2 )

If you go back 60-70 years in western cultures, tattoos had the same stigma of being only for criminals.

Excuse me? More like people who were merchant marines or navy personnel who had tattoos, you need to go back much much further for criminals.

9 ( +11 / -2 )

Nice, this makes me happy. Good luck to Hatsushika. I'm glad he's raising awareness of tattoos.

10 ( +13 / -3 )

Good luck to this guy! It IS about time Japan got with the times. The association with the underworld thing is all a BS excuse to begin with. A lot of people just want to bar entry or good times to those who don't tow the line with their ideals, and that's all there is to it. If politics and people were really that dead against the criminal underworld they would do away with it instead of living side by side and often working WITH them.

8 ( +12 / -4 )

and was told that it can only be done by a medical doctor

Yes, there are many things like this in Japan. The doctors (JMA), through Health, Labor and Welfare Ministry bureaucrats, many of whom are doctors themselves, zealously protect their monopoly on all kinds of procedures that paramedics could do. In this case, they are likely just throwing their weight around like a bull elephant on musth.

1 ( +5 / -4 )

Most aspects of Japanese culture is two generations behind the rest of the world

Any Australian who goes with this line is on thin ice indeed.

3 ( +7 / -4 )

This is one of the benefits of having people less than 60 years of age in the Government. I really wish Japan would elect more people like this who have the ability to look at issues from other angles. By the time people are 60 (generally speaking) there's not much that will change their opinion about things. Congratulations to this man for speaking his mind.

7 ( +8 / -1 )

Changing the law to allow the artists to practice their trade won't change the minds of the people. A lot of people here on JT blame the government for the culture problems of Japan but the truth is the general population has their view and that will be much harder to change.

Another good idea would be to listen to Akie Abe and legalize cannabis. Japan would see another five million tourists.

4 ( +5 / -1 )

I like this guy...let's make him PM !!

Japans attitude towards tattoos make no sense at all. I have a tattoo on my back. It's a proper work of art that took a long time and cost a lot of money. If it were framed and hanging on a wall people would marvel at it. But the fact it is on my back is another matter.

This association with the criminal element in Japan?

I have more chance of becoming PM than I have of being accepted into the yaks.

4 ( +6 / -2 )

I don't recall ever having seen a member of a Japanese sports team engaged in international competition with a tattoo. That suggests to me that the Japan Olympic Committee and the organizations under its umbrella are discouraging tattooing, if not banning it outright. (Likewise for athletes from the two Koreas and China.) I suppose tattoos in China also carry a stigma as they were in use by members of triads in olden times. Not sure what Koreans think about body art, but wouldn't be surprised if similar attitudes prevail. Even when not associated with the underworld, tattooing appears to be viewed as something unwholesome.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Weather it will not stop Owners from kicking people with tats out is to been seen. I myself enjoy Japan for it culture and people. I would not support any interference with other countries culture. In my home country I would support change of cultural practices like equality and discrimination but I can not comment on these issue of tattoos on the Japanese culture.

-1 ( +3 / -4 )

“In the run-up to the 2020 Olympics, Japan is inviting more and more foreigners. If, for example, an athlete like (Argentinian soccer superstar) Lionel Messi attempts to enter an ‘onsen’ (hot spring bath) here, will we turn him away on account of his tattoos? To insist he conceal them all would probably require him to wear a wet suit. Japan would be made a worldwide laughing stock.”

100% agree!! And I'm sorry sir. Japan already is the laughing stock.

Here’s Japan, trying to establish itself as a major tourist destination and then it goes so far as to tell tattooed visitors that they can’t enter one of the country’s biggest attractions? That’s plain stupid!”

Preach on brother!!

“You see today’s young stars in sports like soccer and basketball wearing tattoos, and more fans are influenced to get them too. So the notion that ‘tattoos have a bad image due to their association with criminal syndicates’ no longer applies.”

Exactly. Listen to this man! Get with the times Japan!

“I suppose our travel industry is also embarrassed that although so many inbound visitors are coming, they’re being told they won’t be allowed to enter a public bath or ‘onsen.’ It’s stupid—akin to asking the travel agencies to engage in self-strangulation.”

Not to mention the hot springs that are going to go out of business since their customer base will dwindle as even young Japanese are getting tattoos more and more often these days.

The issue is really part of ‘daibaashiti’ (diversity),” he remarked

My hat off to you sir, for recognizing that diversity is a good thing! (deep respectful bow)

Hatsushika added that he is seeking out fellow Diet members for a “tattoo study group” that may propose legislation to make Japan more in tune with the times.

I suggest Toru Hashimoto!

1 ( +4 / -3 )

If politics and people were really that dead against the criminal underworld they would do away with it instead of living side by side and often working WITH them.

Spot on. That's it, in a nutshell.

9 ( +11 / -2 )

King George V of England had a tattoo on his right arm.

Trying to remember the name of the onsen that wouldn't admit His Majesty....

7 ( +7 / -0 )

Good on him !. Hatsuhika for PM !!

0 ( +2 / -2 )

The very fact that tats among the general population in some countries is a very recent phenomena points to the degree to which it is a fashion or more correctly a fad. Fashions and fads come and go. I see no reason why we Japanese need to cater to the fads and fashions of other countries any more than other countries should have to make special provision for Japanese fads and fashions.

If the current stance on tats in Japan puts off tourists, so be it. As a Japanese I am not at all happy to see the government promoting tourism. It is one of the many reasons I dislike Abe and his policies. I don't want to see my country become an extended theme park and shopping mall. I would much rather see government efforts go into promoting science and engineering to revitalize the economy.

-12 ( +6 / -17 )

It always amazes me that when at the beach, the majority of locals have a tattoo or three. That's serious lost business for the onsens. They typically turn a blind eye.

Japan needs more Hatsuhikas.

5 ( +6 / -1 )

It always amazes me that when at the beach, the majority of locals have a tattoo or three. That's serious lost business for the onsens. They typically turn a blind eye.

Really? When I've been at the beach in the summer, the majority of the people there are kids and they don't have tattoos.

You might see tats if you go to beaches where the surfing types hang out but they probably are not big on going to onsen.

-6 ( +1 / -7 )

Tattoos are no longer uncommon in Japan. Many young people have them for fashion. Delllusioned's notions of japan being 2 generations behind doesn't hold any water. Japan is different, yet, but if you look beneath the surface it is often ahead of many places when it comes to subcultures. And this isn't anything new. It has been this way for quite some time.

Japan puts on a good show of conservatism until you look closely. Japan has many world famous tattoo and piercing artists. Japan has leading experimental music and art leaders. It has many sexual and fetish cutting edges as well.

The Yak notion on tattoos is only kept alive by the aged people who are in denial for the Japan they live in today. I have found many people here with tattoos, piercings, various subcultures and counter cultures.

Very simply, if Japan wants money from tourists, then they need to be open to how foreign people are. It is that simple. Wilful ignorance or denial won't make the country money. Adapting will.

9 ( +9 / -0 )

Refreshing to see that there is at least one diet member with common sense that extends past the shoreline of this country. *Message to Kasumigaseki: Japanese people are not likely to mistake foreign athletes w/body art for local gangsters.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

I have no problem with Japan's stance on tattoos and I think they have every right to maintain it as a general sentiment if that's the way they feel about it. The rest of the world has no right to bully Japan on this, and I don't think the Olympics should have anything to do with it either. The Olympics are not bigger than any of the cultural sensibilities like this that exist in the countries that host those games, and I would have thought that in the interests of true internationalism and global respect, the athletes should be made aware that they may have to cover the tatts in certain circumstances if they are lucky enough to represent their country in Japan.

-9 ( +3 / -12 )

I personally wouldn´t want any sort of hanko stamped on my body...just saying...

4 ( +4 / -0 )

I have no problem with Japan's stance on tattoos and I think they have every right to maintain it as a general sentiment if that's the way they feel about it. The rest of the world has no right to bully Japan on this, and I don't think the Olympics should have anything to do with it either

Show me any written law here in Japan that supports your opinion and I will applaud your stance. But I doubt you will be able to because it doesnt exist.

What a person chooses to do with their body is their own business. Your way of thinking and logic says that no matter what a country deems "culturally" for only a portion of the population, correct, then no one has a right to say anything about it.

Take your logic the next step and start looking around the world and tell me about things that other countries do culturally and then look in a mirror, because if you give Japan a pass here you HAVE to give other countries and cultures the same pass.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

TamaramaJUN. 11, 2016 - 09:04PM JST I have no problem with Japan's stance on tattoos and I think they have every right to maintain it as a general sentiment if that's the way they feel about it. The rest of the world has no right to bully Japan on this,

I have no problem with Japan's stance on tattoos either - at worst I find them disgusting and at best I find them to be conformity disguised as superficial rebellion.

But here's the thing: on this issue it doesn't matter what you or I think. This is not "the rest of the world" "bullying" Japan. This is a Japanese person raising the question of why if something is good enough for basically the rest of the world, why Japanese people have to raise a stink about it. That's a valid question to ask for any number of quirks of Japanese culture.

And frankly, regardless of what I think of tattoos, the fact that this guy is raising the question is awesome. This is a question we need to celebrate whenever a Japanese person asks it. I would gladly give up my chance to live in a society where my personal aesthetic opinions are what is fashionable if it led to a society where people routinely exercised critical thought about what they take for granted as a part of their culture.

Shine on, Hatsushika.

6 ( +9 / -3 )

If politicians give each other tats I have no problem with that as long as they are artistic and in good taste.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

The problem is that most of their supporters are men with tattoos.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

If Japan can allow Arnold Schwarzenegger into the country with no passport, and allow a convicted drug using Paul McCartney into the country, then I am sure exceptions can be made for some famous person who decides to mark their skin.

Don't see why the Diet has to spend time on it. Have someone put a bandage on, or give them a private room.

Here is a bit of humor from Yubaru. "What a person chooses to do with their body is their own business." I am not sure there is any country on earth that holds this as a basis for its legal system. Whatever a person personally believes, claiming this principle as justification for "whatever" is nonsense. It is particularly laughable for Japan, which has literally HUNDREDS of laws preventing people from choosing to do things with their body. Wake up! In Japan, you can't CHOOSE to use a perfectly harmless but effective cold medication. You can't CHOOSE to hop on the back of someone's bicycle. You can't CHOOSE to ride a motorcycle without a helmet. It is a moronic statement with dozens of everyday contradictions.

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

Yubaru

Show me any written law here in Japan that supports your opinion and I will applaud your stance. But I doubt you will be able to because it doesnt exist.

Well, I'm not referring to laws, I'm referring to what appears to be the general sentiment and sensibility towards tattoos. I'm sure you are right about the lack of laws, but I guess this doesn't fall under the black and white of law, but more the vagaries of cultural sentiment based on historical ideals.

Your way of thinking and logic says that no matter what a country deems "culturally" for only a portion of the population, correct, then no one has a right to say anything about it.

Now, now Yubaru, don't try and construct my argument for me, dear boy. I didn't say anything about his right to bring it up in the Diet. In fact, I applaud him for doing so. But, how much support does he have? I don't see waves of pro-tattoo protesters banging down the door of the Diet, do you?

Take your logic the next step and start looking around the world and tell me about things that other countries do culturally and then look in a mirror, because if you give Japan a pass here you HAVE to give other countries and cultures the same pass.

Well, we are discussing Japan here in relation to tattoos and the Olympics, which is covered towards the end of the article. My feeling is this. This is about a prevailing cultural sensibility in Japan towards tattoos. Hatsushika has every right to discuss it and bring it up, but my guess he is still well and truly in the minority, so if the majority of Japanese people would prefer for the status quo to remain the way it is, then that's the way it should stay until they decide otherwise. What always amuses me is on JT is the chorus of non-Japanese posters who get their panties in a twist about this because they are so choked up about 'rights' as they perceive them in relation to this, that they simply can't tolerate cultural practice or sentiment that they see as an affront to this.

I'm not anti-tattoos, and if Japan had a culture of celebrating tattoos I would absolutely support that. Most Japanese tattoo designs are verifiable works of art in my opinion. Magnificent. But if Japan doesn't think that way and still has cultural preferences against them, and visible displays of them, I'm absolutely fine with that too.

-3 ( +1 / -4 )

What always amuses me is on JT is the chorus of non-Japanese posters who get their panties in a twist about this because they are so choked up about 'rights' as they perceive them in relation to this, that they simply can't tolerate cultural practice or sentiment that they see as an affront to this.

FYI I am a Japanese citizen.

2 ( +4 / -2 )

It's interesting that tattoos seem to be popular with people (males and females) who seem to be uncouth. For instance, tattoos aren't seen much on tennis players. I have yet to see a medical Doctor with tattoos. Nor are they to be seen on members of the British Royal Family. Surely the Japanese Imperial Family wouldn't have them either!

0 ( +4 / -4 )

Seadog are you kidding us? In the comments above Gunther pointed out George V had a tattoo, as did Edward VIII (multiple tattoos).

As for your pristine tennis players: Stan Wawrinka, Kim Clijsters among many others. Most doctors (GPs at least) wear long sleeves so it is unlikely you'll see their tattoos if they have them.

And your "uncouth" comment is quite frankly insulting. Perhaps you have led a very sheltered life? Enjoy living in your bubble of purity and don't forget that many cultures around the world actually celebrate tattoos.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

I consider have a tattoo a fashion assessory. Which does not appeal to me. Like When I started my apprentership (1977) I got a crewcut and did people stay clear of me, assuming that I was a prisoner on day release. I got refuse entry into places, due to my hair cut. I could of grown my hair a bit longer. But crewcut were the cheapest cut. So I just put up with the owner,s having to right to refuse entry. So understand people with tats getting upset about being refuse Onsen entry. But the owner reserve the right to allow whom he wants in their businesses.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

@ Disillusioned

I hear your point but its like so many things in Japan. just tarring everyone with one brush.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

FYI I am a Japanese citizen.

Duly noted.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

But, how much support does he have? I don't see waves of pro-tattoo protesters banging down the door of the Diet, do you?

Doesn't matter how much support he has or doesn't have. Even one person, in the Diet, bringing this subject up, refutes your argument that it is a part of the "culture" of Japan to be against tattoos. The older generation of bureaucrats equate tattoos with the Yakuza, yet the younger generation sees them more as body art. Same Japanese people, different perspectives, and who is to say that the older generation is right and younger wrong?

On a separate note.....

Here is a bit of humor from Yubaru. "What a person chooses to do with their body is their own business." I am not sure there is any country on earth that holds this as a basis for its legal system.

Who said anything about "legal" system? So you believe that the state has a right to tell people what to do with their bodies? That kind of thinking is dangerous at best. And it wasn't humor either, the state has no right to tell a person whether or not they can get a tattoo, it's called freedom of expression. You seem to advocate that it is the right of the state to infringe on peoples rights.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

I'm not 100% sure but I've heard South Korea also requires artists to have a doctors licence, so that would make Japan not the only country in the world. From what I heard tattoo parlours don't exist much in Korea. I guess they enforce that law more than they do in Japan because there are a lot of tattoo studios in Japan.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

“Here’s Japan, trying to establish itself as a major tourist destination and then it goes so far as to tell tattooed visitors that they can’t enter one of the country’s biggest attractions? That’s plain stupid!” Hatsushika went on. “You see today’s young stars in sports like soccer and basketball wearing tattoos, and more fans are influenced to get them too. So the notion that ‘tattoos have a bad image due to their association with criminal syndicates’ no longer applies.”

But the notion of marking the skin in the west has been associated with slavery and low class

This fact is still not lost on the educated higher classes !

3 ( +3 / -0 )

A bit rich when the Govt still says that tattoos signify association with the Yaks, when the Govt itself is probably the biggest supporter of them (the yaks that is).

1 ( +1 / -0 )

What would a Yakuza do in a gym or 銭湯♨ that a normal person wouldn't do? Beat up the customers? Shoot up the place? Ha!

I guess business and the economy is so good in this aging population that they don't need anymore money!

Mind boggling turn away money for a "for profit" business. I should open a tattoo friendly gym chain/bath house chain and get ahead of this evolutionary curb‥……

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Yes, Japan should catch up to the rest of the world and be more accepting of "Look at me!" people and the not so bright.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Tattooing in my culture is a gift and privilege. This also must be earned -- not an association with slavery and low class. The New Zealand natives and her Oceania Protectorates and neighbouring countries of islands do not view tattooing as body art only, but more of as Cultural Identity. In my tribes, family members who have "earned" their tribal symbols have the choice of wearing them on their bodies for the rest of their lives or the choice not to. My 20-year-old son has earned his, and he is prepared to carry his ancestors’ symbols on his body for the rest of his life. Currently, I'm designing his tattoos to be worn on his upper left torso, left shoulder and arm, and left back. My family members have never needed sports stars, or criminals to initiate this tradition. However, I will not speak for other Polynesians who are tattooed and have travelled or are travelling to Japan. As preached and handed down to us through my families' generations: Where-ever we travel in the world, we must adhere to and respect the Cultural, Church, and Governmental Regulations of that nation. My son knows that he has to cover up his tattoos on the streets of Japan (rural and urban), not to visit onsens and places of interests that do not serve tattooed patrons. Japan does not deny us foreigners the choices; we have to respect the country and take the required course(s) of actions. My tribes acknowledge that Japan has the best tattoo artists in the world - not because of the numerous circulated literature outside Japan, but because our elders can tell great workmanship in the works of Japanese tattoo artists. I have nephews who own tattoo parlours; they would take up the challenge to learn from Japanese artists like Mr. Masuda - if given the legal opportunity.

So, here's hoping that the Diet may take the time to re-evaluate The Medical Practitioners' Act of 1948. Importantly and foremost, revise this Act for Japan and her gifts of great workmanship - not for foreigners like me and my relatives and surely not for tattooed foreigners who are visiting for only a couple of weeks during the 2020 Olympics.

This is a shame if artists like Mr. Masuda are denied the chance to continue their craft legally.

To Honorable Member Hatsushika: Be Brave! As we the Maori people of Polynesia say: Kia Toa e Kia Manuia! (Be strong, and May the outcome be of your intended!)

5 ( +5 / -0 )

I have to cover up my tattoos at work. (I work at a school in Japan.) I'm moving back to America soon, and I really badly want (on my last day) to wear a dress WITHOUT tights and show what I've had to hide for two years! X-D Along with telling the principal "See, the real reason I couldn't join everyone at the onsen that day was...."

2 ( +2 / -0 )

I approve of this gentleman.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Deb: Why did you have to cover up at work. Even if you sign a contract stating you will cover up tats while at work. It is a human right violation. It like saying we don,t allow red hair people to show their red hair. Not all Onsen bar tats. It is up to the owner. Where a school is a publicly support entity were human right are up held. A onsen is privately owned.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Even if you sign a contract stating you will cover up tats while at work. It is a human right violation.

I'm a tattoo lover, with a lot of tattoos, but I assure you, it's not a human rights violation.

Not all Onsen bar tats.

This is true. I've been to a lot of onsen, and never had any problems.

-3 ( +0 / -3 )

Stanger: Personally I am not worried with who I share a Onsen with, as long as they have a proper wash before entering. You could have you smart phone with you and a can of beer or with a young son running around going off, but I will not stay in a Onsen with a person with dread-locks enters the Onsen. Unless their hair is covered or place in a bun or wrapped in a towel.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

The problem is tattoos are just ugly. When I see a guy with a tattoo, I just think, "Low self-confidence. Needs body 'art' to make him feel like a man." Or I think, "He's a sheep - has to follow what everyone else is doing."

When I see a woman with tats, I just think, "Even lower self-confidence than men. OR she's a drug addict."

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

I have no problem with Japan's stance on tattoos either - at worst I find them disgusting and at best I find them to be conformity disguised as superficial rebellion.

I have a similarly low opinion of tattoos, and yet I find the law absurd and typical of the oyaji mind-set of those who want Japan to return to the glory years of yesterday.

And it's not just onsens. Many fitness centers, such as Joyfit24, bar people with tattoos. These rules are beyond pointless, and certainly make Japan look silly in an age when the country is trying to attract tourists as "cool Japan."

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Many businesses are worried not to put away the regular "normal" customers. As you know if only one from hundreds complain it is already a problem. The owners want no hassle so it is easier just to ban everyone with tattoo.

Now if majority of clients are tattooed I wonder if they will ban the rest for not wearing one? Go figure...

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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