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kuchikomi

Here comes trouble -- of the IS variety, weekly warns

20 Comments

In 2004, an Algerian man going by the name of Lionel Dumont entered Japan on a forged French passport. While working for a used car agency in Niigata Prefecture, he was said to have transferred over 10 million yen to people in Nagano. He also allegedly engaged in smuggling activities, working with Russian seamen.

Dumont, who allegedly had ties to al-Qaida, departed Japan and was later arrested in Germany.

"While his purpose for entering Japan was not clear at first, we learned from the German intelligence services that Dumont had raised some 300 million yen from sympathizers in Japan," a retired policeman informs Shukan Bunshun (Dec 31-Jan 7). "After remitting the funds via an underground banking network he left the country."

That was over a decade ago. So why should this matter now?

Because, the magazine claims, history may be repeating itself. At least two agents of the Islamic State are said to have already entered Japan. They are referred to in the article merely as Mr A and Mr B. The former is believed to be an "advance man" for terrorist activities.

The concerns are not without some basis in fact. According to a source in the police, such details as Mr A's real name, nationality (French), height, distinguishing features, and even the accent with which he speaks are known to authorities.

Mr B, however, is still an unknown. His mission may be to raise funds for his organization, following in the footsteps of the aforementioned Dumont.

If the two are determined to wreak havoc, however, they have their work cut out for them.

"Japan has no network or infrastructure for supporting terrorists or obtaining weapons," a member of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs points out. "For them to pull off the kind of large-scale attack (such as in Paris last month) does not rise to the level of probability."

Should those remarks prove wrong, the task of contending with any type of terrorist attack will fall on two crack organizations, a special forces unit belonging to the Ground Self Defense Force and units of the SAT (Special Assault Team), made up of civilian police.

A source in the Justice Ministry tells the magazine, "If terrorist attacks were to occur in Japan, the ministries and bureaus that deal with the economy, treasury and so on are likely to be targeted."

"We could not rule out that terrorists' aims be to sow panic," he continues. "Targeting of the shinkansen is viewed as a plausible threat. It’s been said that when American special forces raided an al-Qaida headquarters, they found images of Japan's shinkansen. Hopefully this wouldn't be the Tokaido shinkansen, which serves as Japan's 'coronary artery,' but one can't be sure."

No one can rule out the possibility that while maximum security precautions will be taken next May at the G7 summit planned for Ise-Shima, terrorists might instead stage multiple coordinated attacks in Tokyo -- not unlike what occurred in 2005, during the 31st G8 conference in Scotland, when the underground and other transport in London were attacked during the morning rush hour, resulting in 56 deaths (including the four perpetrators).

In anticipation of a similar attack in Tokyo, according to another police source, proactive consideration is being given to merge the SAT police unit in Tokyo with those in neighboring Chiba and Kanagawa and placing them under a single command.

And what about A and B, those two Islamic State agents who may have already slipped into the country?

"The Immigration Bureau and police are poring over security camera footage at international airports and seaports," a police source tells the magazine. But as of Dec 20, no traces of them had been found.

© Japan Today

©2022 GPlusMedia Inc.

20 Comments
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More sensationalism to provoke unfounded fears so that the security state can further limit freedoms and transfer more public money into the security and death industries.

13 ( +19 / -6 )

What sensationalism! When the Jtranslator of the Satanic Verses was murdered yrs ago, that was I think when terrorism started in Japan. His only sin was translating the book. Everybody considered that a murder by a zealot follower. I wonder if the murderer was apprehended. Too bad knowing he was educationally financed by the Jgovt . Besides, some Abu Sayyaf or ex Abu Sayyaf members/ sympathizers are already here legally/illegally. Surely the JEmbassy in Manila would outright give visas to whoever has the right papers.

1 ( +4 / -3 )

"the task of contending with any type of terrorist attack will fall on two crack organizations"

[Insert punchline here]

4 ( +4 / -0 )

“Japan has no network or infrastructure for supporting terrorists or obtaining weapons,”

It also has no network for dealing with either, which is more important. If even the slightest attack occurred, say, in Shibuya or in a subway station, the panic would be unparalleled. So would the foot dragging and finger pointing that would occur before anything was done thereafter.

That said, glad this article is just a whole lot of nothing.

1 ( +4 / -3 )

If even the slightest attack occurred, say, in Shibuya or in a subway station, the panic would be unparalleled.

Please enlighten us with how you reasoned that one?

2 ( +4 / -2 )

There are good numbers of islamic organizations doing charity activities and raising funds based on mosques. Most alarmingly, almost all of the mosques of Japan are managed by Pakistani migrant community increasing the likelihood of funding of extremest sympathizer. Better security agencies beef up scrutinizing fund transfer of each of such organizations.

2 ( +4 / -2 )

Japan has no network or infrastructure for supporting terrorists or obtaining weapons!

But they do have the capability of causing mass casualties by other means other than weopons. Exploding devices can be made with relatively easy to get items. Chemical attacks like they Sarin gas attacks back in the day can not be ruled out. As many people that transit through train stations on a daily basis in Japan would make it easy for mass casualties even with a small exploding device.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

"Japan has no network or infrastructure for supporting terrorists or obtaining weapons,”

Yeah right. Aum had no problems manufacturing, storing, transporting and using sarin, VX and other nerve agents over an extended period, even when alarmed members of the public contacted the authorities, who did nothing.

After the Charlie Hebdo shootings, the French police also supposedly clamped down on the Islamists. Not looking forward to the Olympcs, that's for sure.

2 ( +4 / -2 )

After the Charlie Hebdo shootings, the French police also supposedly clamped down on the Islamists. Not looking forward to the Olympcs, that's for sure.

WoW! Talk about hittin the head on the nail down solid. Excellent post JeffLee. Agree 100%-

1 ( +3 / -2 )

This article seems like its pure fiction based on possible reality......I will give this weird one a pass!!

0 ( +1 / -1 )

trinklets2 - When the Jtranslator of the Satanic Verses was murdered yrs ago, that was I think when terrorism started in Japan.

Terrorism in Japan goes at least as far back as when the Red Army Faction declared war on the Japanese state in 1969. Even if the citizens attacking are from the country being attacked, it's still terrorism.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

@toolong, thanks for the added info. but then again the Red Army was homegrown even though the idea came from external sources. The one on satanic Verses was I'd consider very relevant due to recent circumstances and the perpetrator was a foreigner. Not that I'm being racist.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

Neander- humanoids will do and say anything to qualify their evil base instincts. I know this plot empirically.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Trinklets:

Yes, the Red Armee was homegrown, and we do address the ideology of radical communism. Nobody is claiming that radical communism is OK because there are so many communists out there that are nice people.

About Igarashi`s murder, how do you know his murderer was a foreigner? There murderer was never caught, so do you have information that we don´t? What we can say with certainty is that the murderer was a radical muslim, obeying Khomeinis death fatwah.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Honor every threat.

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

“The Immigration Bureau and police are poring over security camera footage at international airports and seaports,” a police source tells the magazine. But as of Dec 20, no traces of them had been found.

Invisibility cloak? I guess Mr As features aren't as well known as they proclaim.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

@willi, Iam not as socially and politically aware like the rest of you here who can quote after quote sources of maybe infallible truths. Iam just an ordinary foreigner who happen to come across and read some articles in book or newspapers. And accdg to one article, the man was a Bangladeshi. I wonder if there's a Japanese man who are naturalized Bangladeshi citizen for you to give the benefit of the doubt that the killer was a foreigner. Or is there a Japanese who converted to Islam and became a fanatic? But of course, I understand that you're a westerner hence any perpetrator is still a suspect and quite a free man until caught and convicted. You see, Iam,( though I hate it) always out of work hence I've got a lot of time to surf the net. This is my only past time. Pardon if you are intrigued with my comments. Didn't mean to assume anything at all.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Ahhaahhaah stupid news, they must remember that sect Aum had a Russian Military Helicopter in their warehouses, and many others machine guns AK-47.

If a terrorist attack must happened it will.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

More needless fear mongering, pure & simple.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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