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Kiyohara's ex-wife thinking of educating sons in U.S.

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The ex-wife of former baseball slugger Kazuhiro Kiyohara is considering withdrawing their two sons from a prestigious school in Tokyo and sending them to school in New York to avoid fallout from the publicity over Kiyohara's arrest last month for stimulant drug possession.

Kiyohara, 48, and his wife, model Aki, 46, divorced in September 2014. Their two sons are currently enrolled in a private elementary school with a long-standing history of academic excellence.

When allegations over Kiyohara’s suspected drug use surfaced two years ago, the school administration took it upon themselves to carry out their own personal background check on the former professional baseball player, Shukan Josei magazine reported. When they learned that Kiyohara was using drugs, a parent of a student at the school claims that the school immediately notified Aki and gave her two options -- either divorce her husband or withdraw their sons from the elite educational institution, the magazine reported.

A close friend of Aki is quoted as saying: “While the divorce caused a public uproar, the allegations this time around have definitely put Aki in a deep depression. The biggest detriment is the effect caused by changing the current educational environment of her sons. Despite the difficulty of entering into such a prestigious school, she probably figured it was not worth the stress of having her boys continue their education there.”

Another close friend of Aki adds, “Without a doubt, it's the surname 'Kiyohara' that stands out, and it is this factor that is pushing Aki to consider relocating her family overseas. Coincidentally, the school that her sons are enrolled in has a study abroad program in New York that is open to students from their 3rd year in junior high school. With her eldest son advancing to his 3rd year in junior high school next year and the youngest son also graduating from elementary school, Aki made this decision with near-perfect timing.”

However, while it’s easy to talk about the prospect of studying abroad, in Aki Kiyohara’s case, it's not going to be cheap for her and her two sons. A study abroad advisor explains: “The yearly tuition of the New York school in which Aki wishes to enroll her eldest son costs a whopping 5.5 million yen. It won’t be surprising if the tuition for her youngest son is also in the same price range. If you add the cost of education with the cost of living, the yearly expense will add up to about 15 million yen. You also have to factor in that the cost of living in New York is more expensive than Tokyo.”

Meanwhile, magazine Josei Seven, on the same topic, estimates that Aki’s monthly earnings from her modeling career is 500,000 yen, plus a single appearance fee of 1 million yen per engagement. If the model-mom decides to move the family overseas, her work opportunities as a model will certainly be limited.

Furthermore, a celebrity news reporter adds, “While her former baseball star husband earned 5 billion yen during his career, it is rumored that he spent most of his money on drugs and there is almost no cash left." The magazine says that Kiyohara had also listed both sons’ names under his apartment mortgage in exchange for child support payments. Last September, the same apartment was sold with Aki receiving a settlement of 83 million yen. The Josei Seven reporter speculated that Aki does not wish to move abroad solely for her sons' education, but also to ensure that her ex-husband cannot come into contact with the boys. The U.S. has strict immigration laws admitting people into the country who possess a criminal record of substance abuse.

© Japan Today

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68 Comments
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When allegations over Kiyohara’s suspected drug use surfaced two years ago, the school administration took it upon themselves to carry out their own personal background check on the former professional baseball player... When they learned that Kiyohara was using drugs... the school immediately notified Aki and gave her two options—either divorce her husband or withdraw their sons from the elite educational institution.

The media has an obligation to name and shame this school. Pure evil on the part of the school.

This is a time when the faculty should be pulling together to embrace and protect the boys, not stigmatize them. I've seen this sort of thing happen first-hand in Japan, where a student is expelled from a private school in order to preserve the school's pristine reputation, which all too often trumps the schools obligation to nurture the student.

36 ( +39 / -4 )

When allegations over Kiyohara’s suspected drug use surfaced two years ago, the school administration took it upon themselves to carry out their own personal background check on the former professional baseball player, Shukan Josei magazine reported. When they learned that Kiyohara was using drugs, a parent of a student at the school claims that the school immediately notified Aki and gave her two options—either divorce her husband or withdraw their sons from the elite educational institution

disgusting japanese bully society.

24 ( +27 / -3 )

Well said Sensato. Japan's educational system needs a complete overhaul. Low birth rate, children bullying, committing suicide, killing and being abused and neglected. Japan's future is crying out loud and clear, but the system isn't listening.

21 ( +23 / -2 )

Their two sons are currently enrolled in a private elementary school with a long-standing history of academic excellence

It's only elementary school! I can barely recall only a few close friends from that time in my life, so why the big importance in Japan on which elementary school one attends. If you can get the basics of the ABC's and counting down, you will be able to learn as long as you have the right motivation regardless of what school one attended. That proper motivation has more to do with how the parents view education, and the support and emphasis that they place on it more so than the name of a school. I guess that is the difference between the US and Japan in regards to education.

By the way, just because one goes to the "right schools" doesn't guarantee success in life. I can think of two brothers the Melendez brothers sitting in a prison in CA for killing their parents. They both had the best of schools and education and look where that has gotten them. .

8 ( +10 / -2 )

Complete BS on the part of the school, bring to the U.S. find another program that won't charge them that much...

7 ( +9 / -2 )

She should send them to Glenlyon Norfolk, then St. Michael's, in Victoria, both Steve Nash's early schools, both very highly regarded. NYC is the last place I'd send my kids.

-3 ( +6 / -9 )

The school knew about the drug use before the police did?

1 ( +6 / -5 )

Despite the difficulty of entering into such a prestigious school, she probably figured it was not worth the stress of having her boys continue education there.

Moral of the story: It would probably be wise to avoid sending your children to any school in Japan that you are told is "prestigious."

From nursery/pre-school on up through university level, some of the most oppressive and regressive schools here are those widely regarded as being prestigious. Buyer beware.

11 ( +13 / -2 )

The school has to be Keio.

2 ( +4 / -2 )

It's Keio - my student's daughter knows Aki Kiyohara: http://www.keio.ac.jp/index-jp.html Here's the NY affiliated school: http://www.keio.ac.jp/en/academics/affiliatedschools/academy_of_ny.html

10 ( +12 / -2 )

I feel sorry for her. They divorced a long time ago, but as soon as the drug scandal was publicized she lost a lot if not all of her modeling work. I hope she can find more happiness in the states.

3 ( +5 / -2 )

It must be fun to be a celeb and have news sites report all the latest gossip on your and your family's private life.

0 ( +3 / -3 )

She should enroll them in the US. Better yet, move there with them for good, and try to launch a modeling career there. I think she would be much happier.

1 ( +5 / -4 )

Ha-ha-ha, Thanks DeDe. This Kiyohara Saga should actually go into a Manga as a lesson to all athletes that Learning is important and not to neglect other subjects in school. Too many kids dreaming about pursuing professional careers in sports and as "talento". You can see how limited in intelligence and communication that Kiyohara was in the short skits they performed as guests in these countless show and talk useless programs aired in prime time that attracts the futoko and young restless wives. His wife, Aki, is as much to blame for this mess. I suspect that she's as brainless as he was in sending their kids to grade schools as Keio.

1 ( +4 / -3 )

The media has an obligation to name and shame this school. Pure evil on the part of the school.

I know the school, and it really is one of the best schools you can send your children too. But the school cannot carry all of the blame here, the parents of the other students have a lot of influence, and they want no association with Kiyohara. The children have no blame in the matter, but in Japan the consequences of the bad actions of a family member are borne by the entire family. It's not fair, but that is how it is. When parents enroll their kids in these schools, a contract is signed, and it is agreed that not only the children, but the parents must be of good character. You can try to name and shame the school, but the parents of the children who attend the school will support the school's decision, in the end, the school will not be shamed.

One of the things which I like about Japan is that society still has almost zero tolerance for drugs. In many instances, if a family member is arrested for using or selling drugs, the entire family moves out of he neighborhood rather than endure the scorn of their neighbors. It sounds very harsh, but it is one of the main reasons why drug use, and it's crippling effects on society, remains extremely uncommon.

-9 ( +4 / -13 )

Can anybody reading this actually think the school is in the right? I think this highlights the differences in approach between the foreign (western) perspective and the Japanese one. When a westerner reads this, they most likely would immediately shake their head and say how ridiculous this is. When a Japanese reads this, they most likely would agree with the ostecization (from the group) with a "sho ga nap" at the end. This is a very telling anecdote for the culture in general.

2 ( +5 / -3 )

She is not the victim in this situation but was the enabler for Kiyohara to be a drug addict. Of course she knew about the drug use yet tolerated it until the school stepped in and issued an ultimatum. It is quite sad for the whole family. Kiyohara needs to come clean, literally, about his drug use and become an example of how to redeem oneself after horrible life choices. But he will not I suspect as he is too weak.

-2 ( +2 / -4 )

The elite educational institution appears to be a waste of money, at least when it comes to teaching kids about responsibility, understanding, empathy and compassion. What's wrong with the local state school, or a less prestigious school with more heart and a better gasp of what 'education' is?

Interesting that none of the usual suspects are commenting on this - Aki does not wish to move abroad solely for her sons’ education, but also to ensure that her ex-husband cannot come into contact with the boys. And in this case it would be American laws (no entry with a drug record) keeping the father away from his children.

3 ( +5 / -2 )

Sadly this is an aspect of many societies, especially our host country Japan, where the problem is not a local one but the entire social culture of Japan. It is the old "atarimae" (this is how and what should be) a form of compliance and forced acceptance without the open consideration of environment, situation and circumstances and the lives of those that are involved. It is a culture of "blame" and forced social self-righteousness where finger-pointing and requiring others taking responsibility is much too acceptable for their own good.

Parents forget that that their children not only copy but "reflect" their actions and thoughts. That is often visible in harassment. It is not the physical abuse or harassment but the verbal and psychological harassment and abuse that is rampant here in Japan. Often that become the cause of physical reaction such as suicides and outright killings.

Not to say other cultures or societies do not have similar problems, but this case is an extreme case of self-righteousness of those parents that do not consider the lives of those children and adults affected by negative press and lack of support from, the society he/she must live in.

True, social pressure is needed to maintain some social values and standards for that society to survive peacefully and cooperatively sharing responsibilities, but there must be a level of acceptance and a sense of need to help and assist. It is so visible when disaster strikes, but so little when the media picks up the negative to fuel such reactions for and against.

1 ( +4 / -3 )

You really roll the dice when you marry an athlete, so I don't really feel sorry for her.

The kids shouldn't be in school in Japan now anyway . They'll be bullied to no end. At least change their surname to something like Capybara instead of Kiyohara.

1 ( +4 / -3 )

One of the young easts went to that school and they were certainly very hot on security around sports day and other occasions when outsiders might be on the premises. This was because of the large number of kids of famous people (politicians, sports people, entertainers etc) attending; the school didn't want any unauthorised photos taken. There was a also a scandal a few years later when offspring of a porn director and actress were found to have been enrolled. Not sure how they resolved that one. But, it's that kind of school. As a parent, you know what you are getting into so while I don't agree with the school's high-handed actions wrt Mrs Kiyohara, she can't have been that surprised.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

The children have no blame in the matter, but in Japan the consequences of the bad actions of a family member are borne by the entire family. It's not fair, but that is how it is well thats just sums up my previous statements about "culture" being void of common sense and progress. and if I was part of such an archaic culture Id pack the f up and leave taking my family to a country that is void of all this petty "cultural norms" BS, and you understand why so many Japanese that study/work abroad dont come back to live in Japan

5 ( +6 / -1 )

elite schools everywhere care so much about their prestige,its mere business.I strongly believe its a big waste of money.From my personal experience i saw many rich people so keen to enroll their sons and daughters in elite school,mainly for showing up and complete their prestige.Even in USA their are schools,easier to be accepted in Harvard university than these schools.What for?!If a student doesnt have a motivation,desire,and inspiration for learning,best schools and top ranked universities cant help. But frankly speaking,in this case its different,its rather worse,because usually students of such schools are getting depressed when they move from these schools to public or less rank ones.Totally different world,its very difficult if not impossible to get used or cope with.Maybe the solution of talking her sons to USA is the best option,mainly because of their father,but main time another way of wasting money,more worse new different world for sons needs time and big support to overcome.Its a tragedy in all ways and level.I wish her all best of luck in her mission impossible.

0 ( +3 / -3 )

Depends on the type of school the decided on, local Seikei schoo/uni will take from pre-school up to University grads. But not cheap.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

It is a culture of "blame" and forced social self-righteousness where finger-pointing and requiring others taking responsibility is much too acceptable for their own good. so basically instead of staying in the elementary school play grounds as a child it carried on into adulthood in the form a bullying, but yeh its "atarimae" (this is how and what should be) a form of compliance and forced acceptance, thats certainly not a cultural trait id be happy or proud about and people wonder why Japan has so many mental health issues

2 ( +3 / -1 )

sangetsu03MAR. 07, 2016 - 09:10AM JST The children have no blame in the matter, but in Japan the consequences of the bad actions of a family member are borne by the entire family. It's not fair, but that is how it is. When parents enroll their kids in these schools, a contract is signed, and it is agreed that not only the children, but the parents must be of good character.

How do they assess the good character? Do they put the kids in a room full of chocolates and sweets and say, "You must not eat any of these, now we have to go away for a bit, promise you won't steal one while we're not looking," and then watch through hidden cameras? I'm guessing not. They just assume a person is of good character because they aren't involved in a scandal. If the person is later in a scandal, well, that is just proof of their bad character. The system doesn't conceive of the possibility that someone could be getting attention and in trouble without at their core being a bad person, which is as childish and simplistic of an approach to morality as the Christian conceptualization of sin that has plagued the west since medieval times. If they truly wanted to purge the school of people with poor characters, then every single parent who complained about Kiyohara's children needs to be banned. Fundamentally speaking, you cannot have a concept of morality without first accepting the premise that a person is guilty of what they do, and not guilty of what they didn't do. All other notions of right and wrong must flow from that.

0 ( +3 / -3 )

There is a middle road, ie somewhere like the Canadian academy in Kobe. I remember some US friends saying how they got the best of both worlds for their children. Too many drugs in US schools, they were saying. I think Aki needs to take a deep breath before she decides.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

He spent 5 BILLION yen on drugs? Is he supplying free drugs to every junky in Japan?

5 ( +5 / -0 )

It must be fun to be a celeb and have news sites report all the latest gossip on your and your family's private life.

Very true indeed.

Also I can't help perceiving the notion of Japanese that the world is an open oyster while they fail to recognize and remedy the double standard.

She should stay and use her status to try and change things for the better. She and her children have done nothing wrong.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

Aki-in my opinion-has no options left,she has only obligations,but not choices.I dont think its easy to stand others looks and reactions about her ex-husband,nor school management,or even her sons school mates.this is typically what happens in elite schools.nor sure how will be her sons reactions.Unfortunately she is between two bitter choices one is bad,the other is worse.she has to choose and pay the price of her choice.Its all about loss,no gains.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Wow, so the school decided that the two only options it would follow would be either A) for the school itself to cause the break up of a family (she might be better off without Kiyohara, but its not the school`s business to be demanding that) or B) expelling two kids for something they personally had no control over and was completely irrelevant to the question of how they were doing in the school.

That really is a repulsive institution.

That said, I really am developing a strong hatred for Kiyohara now. Drug problems don`t really trigger any self righteous anger in me, if you want to screw yourself over then whatever. But when you are an adult whose problems are now taking your kids down with them....pretty reprehensible.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

She should send them to the International School in Singapore. One of the best in the world. What fascinates me about Japan is that parents will try their hardest to get their kids into a place like this, all the while the official story in Japan is that they want people to conform and not stick out. Nothing sticks out more than having your child go to one o of the most prestigious and hard to get in places in Japan. So do the parents and students just go through all of the hassle to get there, just to downplay it and just let it be their entry into the "elites" where again they will not want to be the square peg trying to fit into the round hole?

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

The elite educational institution appears to be a waste of money, at least when it comes to teaching kids about responsibility, understanding, empathy and compassion. What's wrong with the local state school, or a less prestigious school with more heart and a better gasp of what 'education' is?

One could also argue that the opposite is true. That responsibility is important, and that being irresponsible can have grave consequences not only for one's self, but one's family too. As for empathy and compassion, both have sharp sides as well, sometimes sugar has no effect, but vinegar does.

As for "elite", that is irrelevant, Kiyohara's kids are now not welcome in any Japanese school, public or private, which is why their mother wants to take them overseas.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

how can a school be allowed to punish children for the actions of their father? It's ridiculous

4 ( +4 / -0 )

I wonder if Aki is worried about the Yakuza coming after her kids - if Kiyohara talks in jail about his drug contacts - the yaks might retaliate...

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Reputation more important than the livelihood and education of those kids.... wow.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

sangetsu03MAR. 07, 2016 - 12:24PM JST As for "elite", that is irrelevant, Kiyohara's kids are now not welcome in any Japanese school, public or private, which is why their mother wants to take them overseas.

Who cares about not being "welcomed"? This country has a universal public education system, to which every Japanese citizen is entitled to. If the kids want to go to a public school, the school has no right to decide whether to accept them or not. Aki should sue the pants off of those disgusting bullies running that school. Only Kyohara is responsible for his actions, not his kids or wife.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

When the schools themselves are bullies, do we wonder why there is bullying in schools in Japan?

5 ( +6 / -1 )

Many awesome schools in New Zealand. All free!

3 ( +6 / -3 )

Only Kyohara is responsible for his actions, not his kids or wife.

I guess you forget that his is Japan, where family members can be, and are held responsible for the actions of other members of their family. If you follow the news here at JT, you would have realized that by now. Japan is not made up of individuals, each responsible for his or her own actions, Japan is a society, were the actions of a an individual are deemed to be the responsibility of that individual's immediate society.

This is why family members are held financially responsible when a family member jumps in front of a train and disrupts service, or when an epileptic fails to disclose his disease when he gets a license, and then gets into an accident, or a kid kicks a ball over a wall and an old man riding a scooter has an accident which causes his death a few months later.

If the kids want to go to a public school, the school has no right to decide whether to accept them or not.

The school of course cannot refuse admittance, but the staff and other students can refuse to have anything to do with the children. You seem not to realize how serious the situation is, and how much of a stigma is attached to things like drug use, and being arrested for crimes. Much of the bullying which goes on in schools is related to matters like this. If Kiyohara's ex-wife thought she could get her kids into a school in Japan, she would. Why else do you think she wants to take them to America?

Japan is not like other places, for better and worse. People in Japan must adhere to societal norms, and if they don't, then there are consequences for not doing so, and these consequences apply also to the families of those who break the rules.

I don't like it anymore than anyone else, but that is the way it is.

-3 ( +2 / -5 )

Why else do you think she wants to take them to America?

From the article - The Josei Seven reporter speculated that Aki does not wish to move abroad solely for her sons’ education, but also to ensure that her ex-husband cannot come into contact with the boys.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

a parent of a student at the school claims that the school immediately notified Aki and gave her two options—either divorce her husband or withdraw their sons from the elite educational institution,

Come on guys, this is utter nonsense. A private school approaching one of its own clients paying them a stack of fees, and telling that client to divorce her husband?! And according to another parent at the school?! I have a friend who was a teacher at a private school and the parents boss it, not the schools. The teachers are all stressed out from the demanding parents. Dont believe every unproven magazine allegation.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

The Josei Seven reporter speculated that Aki does not wish to move abroad solely for her sons’ education, but also to ensure that her ex-husband cannot come into contact with the boys.

Nonsense. She knew that he was using drugs for some years before he was arrested, even before their children were born. Stories of Kiyohara and drug use go back to the days when he was still playing baseball. She knew what was going on, and she only divorced him because she had no choice. Had the school not given her an ultimatum, and had Kiyohara not been arrested, they would still be married today, and he would still be using drugs. Moving to keep him away from the children is only a convenient excuse, and if true, she should have done it many years ago.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Look, people. We are having this huge debate based on alleged hearsay in a magazine with no proof that this "other parent" knew anything. It sounds nonsense. Maybe the school threatened to withdraw his children, but there is no way they would get involved in a parents personal affairs.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

pity for those innocent kids. that school instead of having a minimum ethics in education, it is teaching how to destroy the lives of innocents based not on what you are.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

It sounds anything but prestigious. Name and shame the school. Since when do schools give such fickle ultimatums about a family's personal and private life, divorce or take you kids out of the school! With that attitude, her kids would probably have a better private education overseas.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

I cant believe that posters are taking this alleged parents gossip seriously....

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Go... just go, and go fast! The fact that this school did it's own background check and the other crap they're doing, as well as the stress and depression, I say get out. Her modelling career will take a small, short-term hit, but I bet you she will make just as much if not more after moving, and that 'more' will involve appearances on Japanese shows going over there to interview her and ask how things are going, etc. She would get a book published at hte drop of a hat, etc.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

I really thing it's sad that when one member of a family screws up, the entire family is blacklisted: by society, by schools, and in the workplace. It doesn't have to be this way, but it's unlikely to change soon.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

if I were her:

Move to NYC and start writing that new book (as Smith stated). From her Instagram she takes good pictures. Probably choosing NYC for the media connections as well. Book in a year or two to support her living. Keep people informed thru Facebook and Instagram. Maybe a YouTube channel and maybe try Patreon.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

First, go to an international school with an ESL program in SE Asia such as Malaysia, Singapore, Jakarta. Ask the schools how many Japanese students there are in their grades prior to applying, and apply to the schools with least Japanese kids (otherwise, the Japanese kids will just hang out with each other and not learn English as fast). Find a native English tutor to help with homework everyday, then aim two years later to transfer to another international school with no ESL or send the kids off to a Western elite boarding school. Not Keio New York...must deal with "elite" Japanese expat kids there.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

The school knew about the drug use before the police did?

Are you surprised? The police are always the last to know about everything. Rumors about his drug use were public for a long time, yet they just finally arrested him.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

The police are always the last to know about everything. Rumors about his drug use were public for a long time, yet they just finally arrested him.

I am sure everyone knew including the Police. They wanted the family to do something. That did not work so the school got involved. Japan is a small island and everyone knows everything = everyone's problem is your problem. Your cat got out last night -trust me someone saw that.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

She's in for a culture shock when she gets to New York. Schools just aren't as striated in the U.S. as they are in Japan. Pretty much ANY private school is going to deliver similar results when compared to others, so going for the most expensive one isn't going to give her the same benefit doing so in Japan does. Also, there's no such thing as "elevator schools" where the kids have a guaranteed seat when they get to college.

On the plus side, her kids can spend the last year of middle school studying normally rather than cramming for some high-school entrance exam.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

There is way too much information here. Aki Kiyohara really has some blabbermouth friends...

0 ( +0 / -0 )

If she takes the kids to New York, indeed almost any place in the US, and puts them in public schools, they may well come back to Japan knowing more about drugs than their father.

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

If she takes the kids to New York, indeed almost any place in the US, and puts them in public schools, they may well come back to Japan knowing more about drugs than their father.

LoL. Very true. But if they "Just Say No" then they'll be fine. They might enjoy the US.

There is way too much information here. Aki Kiyohara really has some blabbermouth friends...

Its no mystery. Everyone knows Japanese women gossip, blabbermouth and bully one another in their circles. Its really sad how people disassociate themselves with someone like Aki for fear of "losing face."

1 ( +2 / -1 )

a parent of a student at the school CLAIMS that the school immediately notified Aki and gave her two options—either divorce her husband or withdraw their sons from the elite educational institution

All this serious debate, over an alleged claim from an unamed person quoted in a gossip magazine. The school did not give the divorce ultimatum.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

A difficult situation.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

What happened to "Stand by your man"? Oh, that's right, feminism,,,

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

My favourite bit is the idiotic suggestion that he blew all his money on 0.1g wraps of crystal meth. He was pretty much Japan's leading outfielder and on at least 500 million yen a year, with endorsements on the top.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

she just wants to milk her ex

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

What happened to "Stand by your man"? Oh, that's right, feminism,,,

Oh please! If my husband was using drugs and showing all the abhorrent behavior that goes along with the habit including putting my kids in a bad situation I wouldnt stand by him either. That's not feminism, it's common sense.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

I like that everyone is quick to blame the school. Could it be the other students' parents who gave the school pressure to kick the children out ?

1 ( +1 / -0 )

@Mary1. Good point. Just goes to show japanese have that weird mentality.

If the school doesn't kick them out & retain it's prestige, then the Board and Deans might have to deal with parents withdrawing their kids.

Thus, less profits and less "prestige" among the competitive uppity private schools in Japan. So typical in Japan.

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

Elitism at the expense of quality suggests irresponsibility.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

The media has an obligation to name and shame this school. Pure evil on the part of the school.

The same media that basically destroyed Kiyohara's career as well as taking jobs from his ex-wife for being associated with Kiyohara? The media as a whole is heartless.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

From my time in Japan I came across many Japanese who did drugs. Mostly weed but still they were regulars. several good pals. It is much more widespread but everyone still acts so shocked when someone "else" gets caught. There is a serious drug and alcohol culture in the big cities as much as many here want to deny it. Many do the legal drugs aka prescriptions. So many housewives and their anxiety pills. Sometimes the teens get them. I saw so many high on the streets as I was out all night at least once a week for years. Many think that jail will just solve the problem but with the societal bullying and all out pressure, people will find ways to feel "whole". I don't support that but neither do I support the way society in Japan can break a person down to make them conform. All societies have ways of conformity, but in the places most of us have come from we have smaller groups we can survive in even if we are not mainstream. They will market to us and make money off of us too!

Unfortunately for a while her kids will find life difficult in Japan. Even in an elite overseas Japan based school they will be known. What they need is a school that will help them with counselors that will be there for them through the tough times to come. Closer to Asia MAY be better for them AND their mother. She can use her Japanese notoriety a little better for work ...maybe. Small and modeling in NYC don't always go together though she can get print work for a certain age range.

As for NYC I have seen both sides of it in my days there. Rich little snobby a-holes who will be successful because of the connections they form and the doors daddy opens. (Sound familiar?). Also the wierd artistic ones who try to be very different on purpose from all the rest. But they have money to go to the NEW SCHOOL in Manhattan and for those of you who don't know, it produces some of the most successfull creative people in the USA. The main thing is they are not babies. They understand what has happened and will need serious counseling. Japan will wont be the safe cocoon for them for awhile.

Hey remember Nori P returned from a drug scandal. It will take time but Aki will have to scrath tooth and nail to get repect back. I wish her and the kids luck.

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