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kuchikomi

Nationalists converge on Shin-Okubo's Koreatown

131 Comments

Sandwiched between two major streets running parallel, the "Shin-Okubo Koreatown" in Tokyo's Shinjuku district is home to dozens of Korean-style restaurants and retail shops proffering goods that range from Korean cosmetics to items appealing to fans of "Hanryu" dramas.

Shukan Kinyobi (Sept 14) reports that on Aug 25, a large demonstration of rightists -- who are upset over South Korea's territorial claims to Takeshima island (referred to as Dokdo in Korean) -- marched through the neighborhood. The demonstration, whose organizers had tabbed "The Citizens' Great March to Subjugate South Korea," consisted of an estimated 500 demonstrators, many of who waved the militaristic "kyokujitsuki" (rising-sun flag), and who chanted such slogans as "Kankokujin wa kaere" (South Koreans go home) and "Chosenjin wa dete yuke!" (Koreans get out).

Things got even nastier after the march ended, when the marchers broke off into smaller groups of around 10 and moved from the main drag to the neighborhood's many small lanes, where they confronted shopkeepers with even more hostile remarks, such as "Chon-ko wa karere" (Go home, you Korean bastard") or "We'll kill you." They also intimidated compatriots they encountered with veiled warnings like "If you're a Japanese, then don't come to this area."

"It's very aggravating," a worker of a street stall selling confections is quoted as saying. "Some young visitors from South Korea got harangued by the protesters. Since that day, the number our customers has tapered off."

"It appears that the Zaitokukai (short for Zainichi Tokken wo Yurusanai Shimin no Kai or group opposed to special rights for Koreans in Japan) thinks it can build momentum for its movement by harping on the Takeshima and Senkaku issues," says journalist Koichi Yasuda, who authored a book titled "Pursuing the 'darkness' of Internet patriots, the Zaitokukai" (Kodansha), about the noisy group that has been boosting its membership through skillful use of the Internet.

"While I don't see any signs yet that they are increasing their influence, they still bear watching," Yasuda adds. "As far as they are concerned, discriminating against the 'zainichi' (Koreans in Japan) is everything, and they aren't terribly concerned about what will become of the disputed territories in the future. But they can use the timing of the dispute as a pretext for pushing their own agenda."

Some rightists also provoked clashes in the Chinese enclave adjacent to the north exit of JR Ikebukuro station, resulting in police being summoned.

When such run-ins occur, however, Shukan Kinyobi notes that it has been rare for Japan's mainstream media to devote much coverage. And even those who are confronted by the rightists tend to refrain from seeking sympathy from society, perhaps out of fears that any negative publicity will drive away their customers.

When the Shin-Okubo Merchants' Association was approached by Shukan Kinyobi for a comment, it declined on the grounds that "We haven't grasped the details." The Shinjuku branch of the Zainichi Korean Association replied, "There's nothing to discuss." The Chinese in Ikebukuro were also reluctant to speak to reporters.

A staff member at one Korean firm in Shin-Okubo confided to the magazine, "The South Korean embassy here sent out a warning advisory to Korean businesses and groups to the effect that from Aug 25, we should not approach demonstrators or make inflammatory remarks. 'Refrain from any activities that would put your safety at risk,' it advised.

"If trouble were to break out, nothing good would come from it, as far as we're concerned," he added.

As long as this country has no statute against hate crimes, Shukan Kinyobi opines, this kind of ethnic and racial discrimination will remain out of control. Sixty-seven years since the end of the Pacific War, the issue of "territorial disputes" is being used as a new pretext to abet what are long-term trends.

© Japan Today

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131 Comments
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How pathetic. Mr Ishihara must be loving it.

14 ( +17 / -3 )

Was this covered in the TV news? If not, why not?

14 ( +17 / -3 )

Were police present and if so, what was their response?

7 ( +8 / -1 )

The police must ban demo's and protests in Korean and Chinese areas and the gov't needs to introduce a law banning any kind of hate speech.

15 ( +17 / -2 )

Uyoku to Koreans: "Go home"

They ARE home, you idiots.

19 ( +21 / -3 )

I just hope they won't turn violent like those nationalists in China and Korea, who hurts others and themselves. (although inflicting pain on themselves, I just can't sympathize with such idiotic decision except to point and laugh).

0 ( +2 / -2 )

Stupid, that's like the KKK saying to blacks in the US, go back to Africa. With that kind of rhetoric, shouldn't the Japanese leave and give it back to the Ainu? People need to simmer down, this is absolutely madness of the highest level, people might possibly die over some rocks?? Seriously? I just hope the Japanese don't start destroying these peoples stores and livelihoods, these individuals have nothing to do with the dispute! These kind of nationalistic demonstrations always have the potential for becoming far worse as time goes on. But I also blame the media for being one sided in this, they are NOT helping, in all 3 countries, let's get that out of the way. If this escalates to the point of possible war, the aftermath will have ramifications possibly worldwide for a long time. 2 economic super powers, one getting up there and the rest of the world watches. I hope things die down for everyone's sake. But know how all three countries will never back down and are too stubborn, I'm not going to hold my breath.

5 ( +6 / -2 )

I just hope they won't turn violent like those nationalists in China and Korea

Don't be silly. Korea is not like China and Japan where they target tourists and businessmen, harass them, and verbally assault them because they come from enemy countries.

Walk the Myongdong street in Seoul, half the pedestrians are either Japanese or Chinese visitors who have no problems with safety.

But can we say the same for Korean tourists in Japan? Nope.

-8 ( +9 / -17 )

So, did the police come??

This is really sad news, the ppl living there must be rattled, a little scared.

Jpn needs a better stance on hate speech, intimidation, protection of minorities.

But, will we get it...?

7 ( +7 / -1 )

This is nothing new. They've been doing this forever, even way before the island dispute. It's just that Japanese media would usually not cover it, and now it's getting worse. Japanese are just shooting themselves on the foot because Korean tourists increasingly have been staying away from Japan, with tourists from Korea down by 30 percent from two years ago. The Japanese minister of tourism even flew into Korea, and sang the Korean anthem to drum up more tourists from Korea. It didn't work because of the stuff like this.

-4 ( +8 / -13 )

The media here is intimidated by the uyoku. Most Japanese feel they are an embarrassment and don't like being reminded about them in their morning newspaper, so coverage tends to be minimal and usually limited to acts that violate the criminal code. The Zaitokukai are publicity hounds who have harnessed the Internet and particularly YouTube (they film all their own demonstrations for this purpose). I found one online showing them confronting the principal of a Korean school in Kyoto for the sin of using a public playground across the street from his school, for students' sporting events. The rightists would not leave and were doing everything they could to provoke the principal and others who appeared to be teachers. If any police were on hand they did not appear in the video.

7 ( +7 / -1 )

but why are these koreans given special visas in the first place? if they want to stay, they should get the regular long term visa and be subject to all the requirements or become citizens and give up their korean passports.

-14 ( +2 / -16 )

Zainichi Tokken wo Yurusanai Shimin no Kai or group opposed to special rights for Koreans in Japan

What special rights do ANY foreigners have in Japan? The only one I can think of is the right to use a JR rail pass, and even then it's only limited to those with a holiday visa.

Yasukuni:

Was this covered in the TV news? If not, why not?

Tell me when they do cover it. I'm sure posters like NigelBoy will point out to all the abundant articles in the Japanese newspapers.

2 ( +6 / -4 )

Funny how Koreans in Japan get prosecuted while Japanese in Korea are living there in normal lives. Japan was always imperial aggressor and divider of Korean people.

-2 ( +5 / -8 )

NHK is full of coverage of the anti-Japanese demonstrations in China but have nothing to say about the Japanese fascists doing the same thing here. NHK news is full of bias and distortions.

15 ( +18 / -3 )

zichi:

" The police must ban demo's and protests in Korean and Chinese areas and the gov't needs to introduce a law banning any kind of hate speech. "

Not that I have any sympathy for the Uyoku, but who is going to determine what is "hate speech". You?? Messing with free speech is the top of a slippery slope.

-1 ( +3 / -4 )

I'm no fan of hate speech laws, but I think marching around declaring: “We’ll kill you," constitutes a clear threat against the Korean community.

That in itself should be sufficient to put a few of these guys away for a little bit, no new legislation required.

9 ( +11 / -2 )

@WilliB

Hate speech is basically threats that target ie: race, sex, religion, etc. Threats are illegal in the US. Basically I cant tell someone "I will kill you". I can be arrested for something like that in the states. Free speech is generally not targeting a specific person or group and is meant to just express ones opinion. These are verbal attacks not free speech.

Saying, " Koreans need to go home" is very different from saying "Go home you Korean Bastards". The latter is not free speech it's malice. Malice is illegal in various countries around the world. Hate speech is under Malice.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

WilliB

My own country, Britain has hate speech laws.

"Expressions of hatred toward someone on account of that person's colour, race, nationality (including citizenship), ethnic or national origin, religion, or sexual orientation is forbidden. Any communication which is threatening, abusive or insulting, and is intended to harass, alarm, or distress someone is forbidden. The penalties for hate speech include fines, imprisonment, or both."

12 ( +14 / -2 )

"Hate speech" and "free speech" are very different.

13 ( +15 / -2 )

"When such run-ins occur, however, Shukan Kinyobi notes that it has been rare for Japan’s mainstream media to devote much coverage. And even those who are confronted by the rightists tend to refrain from seeking sympathy from society, perhaps out of fears that any negative publicity will drive away their customers."

Looks like Chucky was right yesterday when he said assaults were happening on people of other nationalities in Japan, and I was right when I pointed out the media would not cover it like they cover assaults on Japanese abroad.

Thanks again, Ishihara!

0 ( +3 / -3 )

but why are these koreans given special visas in the first place?

I don't think "special visa" is really the right term. By virtue of their status as former subjects of Japan's prewar empire, they were more or less automatically given permanent residence by bureaucratic fiat, so they didn't need to go through the usual application process. By that time, many Koreans couldn't go back anyway due to outbreak of war on the Korean peninsula. Today's zainichi population has been declining as the older generation dies out. Many do assimilate and naturalize. Lots of them intermarry with Japanese and take their spouse's family name.

4 ( +5 / -1 )

Shukan Kinyobi's story based on Korean sources in the famous Okubo/Kabukicho korean area in Shinjuku. Sounds really credible. Sasugadana, kuchikomi.

-8 ( +0 / -8 )

Mary@Since the Zaitokukai seems to have recorded a video of their Aug. 25 march (with sound) right here on YouTube, what parts of the story do you have trouble believing?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1Rrky8c76zw&feature=related

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Anti-Korean discrimination is common in Japan nowadays.

0 ( +3 / -3 )

breakingpoint: "Anti-Korean discrimination is common in Japan nowadays."

Part of the point of this article is that it's always been common in some circles (ie. Uyoku), but that it's only now becoming encouraged to the point where they can freely push their agenda. These people are radically insecure.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

racism, its a funny thing.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Virtuoso, Zaitokukai walking/"shouting" in that Korean red-light district do really look like simple-minded fools. (Amused to see them having been rebutted by smiling "local" girls, and not by this kind of Yak http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hisayuki_Machii who would be in charge of the Okubo/Kabukicho area. Harmless laughing stock ? )

-3 ( +2 / -5 )

"it's always been common in some circles (ie. Uyoku), "

And funnily, many of the most noisy "black van Uyoku" seem to be ethnic Koreans like this http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hisayuki_Machii

-3 ( +3 / -6 )

Crazies gone wild... Do something more productive like guarding the islands to the south from a Chinese invasion.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Virtuoso: "By virtue of their status as former subjects of Japan's prewar empire, they were more or less automatically given permanent residence by bureaucratic fiat, so they didn't need to go through the usual application process. "

The problem might be that most of the Koreans, who got this "special" status in the post-war era, seem to have smuggled into japan after their independence, in reality Typical is this billionaire Pachinko tycoon http://ja.wikipedia.org/wiki/%E9%9F%93%E6%98%8C%E7%A5%90 who smuggled into japan in October 1945 and immediately obtained the "special" status. Now he is a highly-decorated (Order of the Sacred Treasure) Japanese citizen.

-6 ( +3 / -9 )

in that Korean red-light district

It WAS a red-light district... before the Koreans moved in and cleaned it up. When I stayed there in the late 80s it was a dirty, scummy area with awful food, low-priced love hotels, "delivery health" prostitutes, and migrant construction workers, and yes nearly everyone was Japanese at the time.

Now, it's now a vibrant, fun place that has been refreshed and rejuvenated by Asians, whose contributions are utterly ignored by the bigots.

2 ( +9 / -7 )

"It WAS a red-light district... before the Koreans moved in and cleaned it up. When I stayed there in the late 80s it was a dirty, scummy area with awful food, low-priced love hotels, "delivery health" prostitutes, and migrant construction workers, and yes nearly everyone was Japanese at the time. "

When I was a kid in Tokyo in the early 1980s, it was already a famous Korean district ---"dirty, scummy area with awful food, low-priced love hotels, "delivery health" prostitutes, and migrant construction workers, " They occupied the Kabukicho/Okubo/Hyakunincho area soon after the Japanese surrender in 1945. Then, the area was burned fields just like most other towns/cities of japan, as a matter of course.

-9 ( +5 / -14 )

I was there. It was very ugly indeed.

3 ( +5 / -2 )

When I was a kid in Tokyo in the early 1980s, it was already a famous Korean district

That's odd, When I spent a week staying at Okubo House in 1986, I don't recall seeing any kind of Korean presence. Half the customers in the dorm-style guesthouse were farmer-migrant workers from Yamagata Prefecture, the other half western tourists on a budget.

I also don't recall any of those trendy and high-quality Korean restaurants on Shokunin Dori, until about 10-15 years ago. Back in the 80s the only restaurants for eating on Okubo and Shokunin were ramen, soba counters and teishoku places, cheap, low-quality food for the Japanese farmer-workers, and everybody there seemed really poor.

I had a Japanese girlfriend who was born there. Her family moved in the 70s "because the air was brown," she told me.

It's a much, much nicer area now, thanks to the newcomers.

6 ( +11 / -5 )

JeffLee, it's really, really odd.

So, when you stayed in the Okubo/Kabukichi-cho red-light district in 1986, you didn't notice thousands of korean women working for the korean "business" owners around there ? Sad reality.

-12 ( +3 / -15 )

Jeff, I used to live in Shinjuku 7-chome until a few years ago. Shin-Okubo was the closest station at the time (just before the Fukutoshin line opened) and I walked along the main street to get to my house. Every night I was asked "oniisan, massage ikaga?" in accented Japanese. Sure, there are a lot of new restaurants but the streets are still dirty and there still are many cheap love hotels or fuzoku businesses once you turn into an alley. Pretty similar to Uguisudani, if you ask me. Not a good place to raise a family.

4 ( +6 / -2 )

breakingpoint

Nope Lotte's HQ was located in that area during the 70's and I believe it still is.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

Chucky3176:

I usually disagree with you but this one, I am Japaneses but I am with you.

As a Japaneses man, it is so upsetting me this happened in Japan even if they are small percentage of extremest in Japan out of 125 millions.It makes me angry. We must be more responsible to the world for any action we take. Japan really needs a functional government A.S.A.P. My government has been becoming my enemy these days. Since the democratic party of Japan took the majority, I can NOT see where we are heading for. It is about time to disband the current government for the Upper House as well as the lower house for the real election of 21 century. I am very sure, the result would be 100% different from the last one. Even today`s Japaneses government can not make an unity within their own party.

Korea. Thank you for keeping Myongdong street in Seoul, even under this political circumstances to be safe. You Koreans are manifesting a big difference from China today. Kamsaminida.

Since we have,the Japan US treaty, again, we all Japaneses must be very responsible. Otherwise, if war brakes out for Senkaku since it is the part of the treaty as Okinawa prefecture, we might jeopardize a life of American men and women in uniform as well. Japan must think that,too.

It is about time if our commitment for the world peace after the last war is real or not.Making the largest donation to UN is not good enough to manifest it. If we could express our commitment this time how we achieve a solution with China in civilized manner, We will not resolve the issues on just the islands but may obtain some respect from the world since the world is watching us.

I want to say my government, DO NOT think only what we want but focus on what we need now. Still we are in time to avoid terrible result. We must firmly face to China with our policy (sadly i do not see it) and pitch some government package for diplomatic overture A.S.A.P. While our Korean friends are waiting for a while. (Korea canceled their military drills as Takeshima this time)Then we could use this diplomatic overture as our lesson to face to Korea.

11 ( +12 / -2 )

@Mary Marylander

I don't know how you're getting away with your comments here, but your racism is obvious and unpleasant.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

The Koreans are very good at disguising And pretending to be Japanese. If you're a westerner you wouldn't or couldn't tell the difference unless you knew their names, which are also slightly different from japanese.

Chucky3176 - stop trying to portray 500 demonstrators as representatives of Japan. Korean tourist deface Japanese property when they visit, are known to be the cause of graffiti in many of their host nations, go on killing rampages on us university campuses. The lie to their business counterparts and say they are Japanese, stealing/borrowing the reputation of decades of hard working Japanese from the post ww2 era. You Koreans try to paint the Japanese as the same people who controlled your country when the truth of the matter is the current Japanese are peace loving people. Koreans and zainichi try to spur and instigate the Japanese and use words like samurai to paint a savage warrior image of Japan without understanding what samurai class really even means. The current generation of Japanese have pride and our proud of the people of Japan who rebuilt the country after ww2. At least Japan doesn't teach racism in elementary comics and picture books, something Korea is notorious and well documented for. I have some Korean friends but I've stopped buying Korean products or eating at korean restaurants completely. I cannot pay someone money who in the back of their minds are thinking "stupid inferior japanese.". I even know of white Americans who in the US will enter a sushi restaurant and test the host and observe the workers and determine if they are Korean or not and when they learn they are Korean walk out of the restaurant immediately. There's something to be said if even Caucasians are looking for a genuine Japanese eatery. You can't copy the Japanese essence of politeness, it's picked up and taught through experience at early age in life, right about when their Korean counterparts are learning racism and hatred of the Japanese (and to some extent the us and china). There's a reason why countries have the reputations that they did/do.

-21 ( +5 / -24 )

Wasabizuki, politeness exists in every culture. Japanese are just aggressors here as always. Stop fantasying that Japanese are perfect when they do things that are horrible.

1 ( +7 / -6 )

My Wife used to work in that area before her company moved their HQ.

Agree, with the massage offers(get those locally too) but it got so bad there that love-hotels refused to allow mixed couples to enter.

Still the area is now more Korean than the original Korea town and the same thing is happening to Ikebukuro (The new Chinatown).

Not sure about the 80"s but the area boomed in the late 90's and is now a major spot for shopping, etc for the ladies.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

Exploitation and discrimination of minorities in Japan is no different than anywhere else in the world. Unfortunately if it doesn't get reported, no one knows about it.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Discrimination and racism exist in every corner of this world, even though just in minorities. This group of idiots are a disgrace to Japan, agree to that. But what is the cause of all this turbulence to make those fools act more vigorously? It's Korean & Chinese medias & propaganda system, which got nothing better to tell but to verbally attack Japanese, make the matters escalate to a whole new level this time. Human's tolerance has a limit you know.

2 ( +5 / -3 )

Don't be silly. Korea is not like China and Japan where they target tourists and businessmen, harass them, and verbally assault them because they come from enemy countries.

Good for Korea. But it was the poor animals which were substitutes for angry Korean demonstrators. Japanese national birds getting their heads ripped off and the live pig which got pulled apart. Where was PETA when they were needed?

-2 ( +5 / -5 )

Media of all kinds serves to reinforce their own agendas and constituencies; ie Japanese media is no different than Korean, Chinese, American, etc.. Tolerance is knowing when to stop reading the propaganda newspaper and walking away.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

Who is going to determine what is hate speech? How about the remark, "I'll kill you!" in the context of "you Korean bastard" and "get out of Japan," etc.? That's hate speech pure and simple.

What would happen if a foreigner said to a Japanese in front of a policeman, "I'll kill you, you Japanese bastard"? I am sure the policeman would at least ask to see the foreigner's alien registration card.

I am all for banning hate speech when it is linked to group hate action, as in this case. The rightists have been at this sort of thing for a long time now, and of course it gets unreported by the likes of NHK.

I too wonder how much Ishihara is enjoying this. I also wonder whether Gregory Clark takes any satisfaction from this ugly business, having published an article entitle "Japanese People Have the Right to Discriminate Against Foreigners" in the Japan Times a few years back.

There will be a backlash to this in South Korea. Then what? Backlash in Japan?

If the Noda government had an ounce of common sense they would denounce these rightist scumbags in no uncertain terms. But of course they won't.

4 ( +5 / -1 )

Mary: Racist alert!!! Let me guess, you think the Japanese customers who visit said brothels fall into the women and ejaculate by accident? I'm also guessing you're a sex slave denier.

Moderator: The next time you are impolite to another poster, you will be suspended from the discussion board.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

I've been wondering when the rightists will wise up and head to Shin-Okubo on weekends. They come to the Korean Embassy on Saturdays and Sundays and aim their loudspeakers at a nearly empty building. The regular staff has weekends off. Meanwhile over at nearby Shin-Okubo Japanese shoppers (mostly middle-aged women) are busy buying up Korean goods ... especially stuff bearing the images of Korean singers and entertainers. This is where the big weekend audience is ... not around the Korean Embassy. So blasting anti-Korean slogans over loudspeakers in Shin-Okubo's Korea Town seems only logical ... a much larger audience ... and somebody to listen to their ravings.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Oh I am SO shocked that the J media isn't covering such reports. When do they ever cover things like this?? Never. Can't have the victims thinking they're as bad as the evil foreigners, right?

0 ( +1 / -1 )

ah, harking back to the 'good old days' where they just lynched people for being Korean after the Kanto quake. Uyoku are cockroaches.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

Zichi:

" My own country, Britain has hate speech laws. Expressions of hatred toward someone on account of that person's colour, race, nationality (including citizenship), ethnic or national origin, religion, or sexual orientation is forbidden "

Yeah. By that definition, of course, you would need to outlaw the Koran, but of course no one dares that, because that would mean the dogma of "hate speech" collides head on with the dogma of "religious freedom".

And so you have completely selective application of that law, which means an open door to all sorts of abuse. What a massive mess you have gotten yourself into with that.

I say don´t step on that slippery slope in the first place.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

And by that comment will, the bible would also need to be banned then, right? Not just the Korean. No place for anti-Muslim feelings on this thread.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

zichi above got a lot of thumbs up for

"Hate speech" and "free speech" are very different.

including from me. But my question is, do japanese know the difference?

I don't think so. Generally they shy away from anything confrontational, but if someone DOes happen to have an emotional outburst, it is seen as justifiable because the person must feel that way or they wouldn't get emotional. Ie they respond to emotion and honesty and are easily swayed. (no, not everyone, and also, everyone is not always swayed by the same things). They won't necessarily agree with it, just accept it for existing. Then, they will remain if they are involved somehow, agree with the attacker, or are the attackee, but will otherwise pay no attention because "it doesn't have anything to do with me". I would even argue that is half the reason why this doesn't get on NHK that easily (recently I don't watch it much anymore, so I don't know).

Short answer- don't expect a "human brotherhood"-like movement on a large scale here anytime soon, nor hate-speech laws neither. It is all just someone else's problem.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Too bad hate speech/ anti-discrimination couldn't be linked to the anti-nuke power movement somehow. A lot of ppl care about that and are still protesting. Once something like that is linked to something else (nukes) that ppl have an emotional attachment to, it gains momentum and acceptance.

I think one reason civil rights in the US in the 60s was successful was because it was connected to the next wave of feminism and anti-vietnam mvmnt.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

I'm sure the police were escorting and protecting the nationalists from those who might be offended by their hateful slogans. God forbid someone pop on of those idiots in the mouth for saying "I'll kill you" (although it would be well deserved!) Whenever I read the word nationalist in the Japanese media I always take it to mean RACIST (and amazingly, so do my Japanese friends!)

2 ( +4 / -2 )

Nearly all of the protest marches in Japan are registered before-hand, hence the police presence which guard them and prevent any outside interference.

Hence why protests in Japan are peaceful and not riots as they are known and legal. Seen them many times walking past my apartment with the cops blocking traffic, etc.

And still some posters want us to believe that they will attack foreigners in the presence of police, etc. Huh?

0 ( +2 / -2 )

The Koreans are very good at disguising And pretending to be Japanese.

lol at wasabizuki.

Ladies and gentlemen, please read wasabizuki's post which is exhibit A, representing the vast majority of Japanese attitude toward Koreans: blaming their shortcomings and embarrassed moments on Koreans every time. That's the Japanese way.

I rest my case.

-5 ( +4 / -9 )

Why don't they round up all these nationalist kooks, Japanese, Chinese, Koreans, Americans, Anti-muslims, Anti-blacks, Anti-jews, Anti-scientologists, whatever, shove them all on a small island somewhere and let them dook it out?

5 ( +5 / -0 )

In Japan, to orchestrate a gathering of five or more people in public space, the organizer is required to file a request sheet to the local police stating the intention of the demonstration the time with starting time and end time. I believe they are also require to sign a statement that the demonstration will be peaceful and willing to cooperate with the local authority.

When authorized the police draws a patrol plan on how to control the gatherning and estimate the number of personnel required.

I believe the request is required to be filed seven days in advance or it will not be authorized.

The authorization is not given to listed offenders and or organized crime groups.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

It's me,

so what are you saying, was there a police escort to these guys shouting these hateful slogans on the main street, then breaking up into groups of ten or so and shouting horrible things to average ppl, jpns and Koreans alike and likely causing them extreme dis-ease and fear? Each little intimidator cell had their own cop escort?

If not or you don't know, you shouldn't post that kind of comment because it is very misleading. What this article says of that demonstration is a lot different from an y of the rightist demos Ive seen, and Ive seen a lot.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Lowly.

Look at the pics and links posted, easy to spot the police presence. Pretty standard procedures for a legal protest.

You want to see a real riot, I seen too many outside my office building in South Africa. Go there now close to the platinum and gold mines and you will see way worse.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Lowly

IF the article is true and I emphsize the word IF, the local police authorized this gathering then the police did require to escort the group and verify that the group had disbanded into a group less then five and those groups did not cause any physical damage to the surrounding community. Any groups regrouping to a number more then five and shouted out loud would be prosecuted.

The loop hole is again IF they did not shouted out loud in public then they can walk around in groups. As an example, the demonstration against Fuji TV in Odiba a while back did not shout any words and stated that they were merely taking a stroll around Fuji with the flags in their hands.

That is the law.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

Lowly.

I don't truly know as I wasn't there physically, in short I read the same reports as you do.

But I have seen many protest in japan against article 9, nuclear energy, etc they and always had the same pattern for close to 15yrs.

Said that what I saw on TV about the trashing of the japanese stores in China is way different.

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

I am NOT pro/con either side just posting my observations based on personal experiences.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Myself not either Japanese, Korean or Chinese.

Just an observer looking on and giving my Opinion from the data I get.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Hate speech laws are useless, and do nothing but chill the debate. Hate is just another human emotion, the same as love or fear or sorrow. There is no sense trying to ban it.

The British law is case in point. I can hate you, as long as I hate you for WHO you are and not WHAT you are. How ridiculous. The government deciding the criteria by which it is OK to hate someone....

Uttering threats and intimidating someone is already covered under criminal law. There is no need for an extra layer of protection.

-4 ( +0 / -4 )

"We'll kill you." - That's so much more "mature" than the Chinese protesters, right? Good showing, Japan!

0 ( +3 / -3 )

Uttering threats and intimidating someone is already covered under criminal law. There is no need for an extra layer of protection

That maybe true, but the thing that worries me is that the police don't even take this seriously, not only when the victim is a foreigner but also when it's a child being physically bullied or when a woman is being stalked and had threats made to her life.

What I find strange is that, initially when they had anti-nuclear demonstrations, there were counter-demonstrations by the right-wingers, criticizing the first group for being unpatriotic (don't ask!). I see these right-wingers soon disappeared as the anti-nuclear camp grew. ie they were scared and outnumbered. So what do they do? They turn their attention to those who can't fight back - Korean shop-owners who know police won't help them, and obaasans who can't fight back. How brave of these right-wingers! Reminds me of when they attacked that cinema-owner's elderly mother outside her own home.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Hate speech laws are useless, and do nothing but chill the debate. Hate is just another human emotion, the same as love or fear or sorrow. There is no sense trying to ban it.

Hate speech does not equal "hating the person".

0 ( +2 / -2 )

itsme,

well, I didn't see any links and Im too sleepy now to search, so I'll take your word for it if that's what you saw.

the stuff I've seen here, they never break up in to littler groups and go dn residential streets, so that sounded scary, and un-checked by police to me.

On another note, the protests in China where jpns store was destroyed was on heavy rotation on the news tonight (not NHK, cable TBS), but not a mention of this in Shin Okubo. Which is really what I wanted to say, itsme, yeah, I'm sure it is worse elsewhere in the world, and in Japan at other times, but the fact that it is just brushed under the rug, no police presence even (I thought), no reporting. Yet, they are the victim of the Chinese protests and now jpns bodies from wwII aren't getting returned from one of the Koreas is also on the news. It always seems to be a one way street.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Korean are really trying hard to play victims,

I don't see any Koreans playing victims here. Korea hasn't protested to Japan, nor have any Koreans complained. There has been stories in the Korean media that shows the attacks on Koreans and Japanese who are mistaken to be Koreans, which basically warns South Koreans from going to Japan due to safety issues caused by the racial Japan. Other then that, there are no reactions in Korea. Maybe Koreans are pretty familiar with how sneaky/sly Japanese are, little people acting big when the numbers are great, but weak and pathetic when they're by themselves.

-4 ( +5 / -9 )

Has anyone else or has there been a news article at least that addresses the fact that there seems to be more of this kid of agitation amongst the three countries?

Isn't this all about possible sea bottom oil reserves? It'd be nice if everyone just dropped the pretenses for once and just talked straight.

Mutual cooperation and benefit should be what is to be pursued, not this "It's mine! All mine and I can prove it with spun facts!" nonsense.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Has anyone else or has there been a news article at least that addresses the fact that there seems to be more of this kid of agitation amongst the three countries?

One would hope that these three countries with common cultural roots and long civilized histories could apply Eastern wisdom to solve their problems. Instead, they're all acting like immature kids in the sandbox.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

When I read Korean press, I always see very offensive articles towards Japan. Also, when there are anti-japanese protests in Korea, I saw pics where they burn Japanese flags, and I really doubt nobody never offended some Japanese person in those occasions. Here some people seem very biased. Racism is the same everywhere, and sadly Japanese/Korean/Chinese are all very nationalist countries.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

are all very nationalist countries.*

people, I meant.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

But the guys in Shinokubo didn't smash or burn anything. Watch it to the end, and they seem a pretty harmless bunch and it didn't look like didn't look like 500 to me. They should watch their language though.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

*Shukan Kinyobi (Sept 14) reports that on Aug 25, a large demonstration of rightists— I don't get it. Why is it being reported almost a month later and a day after anti-japanese protest?

5 ( +5 / -0 )

Protests never get Violent in Japan. But among 130 million people there will always be a group of haters.

1 ( +5 / -5 )

The Citizens’ Great March to Subjugate South Korea

Is this 1940? Do we still want to subjigate neighbors, nations or any human being? When I think of the great subjugators I think of Attila The Hun, Idi Amin, Pol Pot, Josef Stalin and of course the big cheese of sujigation himself ... Hitler. No Japan I think this is a dangerous road you are on and there are much more inteligent and humain ways to deal with this situation.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

*Shukan Kinyobi (Sept 14) reports that on Aug 25, a large demonstration of rightists— I don't get it. Why is it being reported almost a month later and a day after anti-japanese protest?

Good question.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

So genjuko you think Koreans should not sell sushi? My wife is Korean and eats sushi every day and guess what so do her Korean friends. In Coquitlam B.C. a sub. of Vancouver there are many Koreans and korean resteraunts and get this every single one of them sell sush, it's almost like it's a regular part of their diet. I guess because I have Scottish/English heritage and happily love pizza, szechuan, perogies and teriyaki beef I don't find it pathetic in any way that Koreans sell sushi: though complaining about it is definately pathetic. When I met my wife she was attending ESL and her and another Korean girl use to hang out with three Japanese girls, they are all still friends today7 years later, they have their differences but they have many more simularities. Listening to 5 beautiful asian girls trying to have a conversation using Konglish and Jinglish is just about the cutest thing you could ever see which is why I think conversing would be so much more preferable then this relentless bickering.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

genjuro, here's hoping that you end up in the hospital in intensive care very soon

0 ( +0 / -0 )

genjuro, here's hoping that you end up in the hospital in intensive care very soon.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

genjuro, here's hoping that you end up in the hospital in intensive care very soon..

0 ( +0 / -0 )

genjuro, here's hoping that you end up in the hospital in intensive care very soon...

0 ( +0 / -0 )

genjuro, here's hoping that you end up in the hospital in intensive care very soon....

0 ( +0 / -0 )

genjuro, here's hoping that you end up in the hospital in intensive care very soon. Cvnt

0 ( +0 / -0 )

genjuro, here's hoping that you end up in the hospital in intensive care very soon. Cvnt.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

genjuro, here's hoping that you end up in the hospital in intensive care very soon. Cvnt..

0 ( +0 / -0 )

genjuro, here's hoping that you end up in the hospital in intensive care very soon. Cvnt...

0 ( +0 / -0 )

genjuro, here's hoping that you end up in the hospital in intensive care very soon. Cvnt....

0 ( +0 / -0 )

All very stupid and offensive to the Korean folk on the receiving end of the abuse. However, these poor right wing losers are not yet damaging property and attacking people, swimming to the islands or attacking cops (like is happening in China).

1 ( +2 / -1 )

However, these poor right wing losers are not yet.... attacking people

How many Japanese people have been physically attacked in China? .

1 ( +1 / -0 )

It wasn't reported because there weren't anywhere near 500. It's a group that do lots of stuff like that, video it, say otsukaresama at the end and put in on youtube. The leader is a chubby guy with glasses who talks big but doesn't seem anywhere near as harmless as people who are smashing cars. Interesting group. Hopefully some gaijin will interview him one day.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Hopefully some gaijin will interview him one day.

The chubby guy goes by the fake name Makoto Sakurai and was interviewed in the NY Times by Martin Fackler in 2010. The article is online.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

However, these poor right wing losers are not yet damaging property and attacking people, swimming to the islands or attacking cops (like is happening in China).

Haven't Japanese dissidents and film makers been assassinated or attacked by the J right-wingers? I recall a mayor stabbed to death for his 'unpatriotic' views by one of those fanatics.

5 ( +5 / -0 )

Very disturbing and sad.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

Was this covered in the TV news? If not, why not?

I'm sure it was on Chinese and Korean TV.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

They like to hate on Koreans, yet when they don't mind pretending they are Koreans when the need arises in China.

Japanese say they are Koreans to avoid being assaulted in China

http://www.yomiuri.co.jp/national/news/20120918-OYT1T00674.htm?from=top

-4 ( +3 / -7 )

they don't mind pretending they are Koreans when the need arises in China.

And can you blame them? Heck, I'd claim to be Scottish, even, if I thought I was about to be beaten up for being English.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Yes, but why pretend to be someone you hate and despise so much? Why not pretend to be a Mongol? A Thai? Any number of other Asians?

-4 ( +1 / -5 )

I'm just repeating that same question that the Japanese commentators to that Yomiuri story are asking.

-4 ( +1 / -5 )

overchan and some others-

You say that protests are not violent in Japan. What is correct is most protests very recently don't usually get violent. Some do, and in the 60s thru early 80s ( I think) there were several periods of VERY violent protests. I know lots of ppl age 45-60 or so who were in or saw them. ppl died or were beaten bloody by the cops or opposing protest groups. Often the demonstrators would lock arms and march and the police would break the chain and then chase small bands down alleys so they could really beat the living crap out of them out of the eye of the tv cameras.

I don't see that happening w/ a lot of the young guys today, but you never know when it could change. And these right wingers like maybe the ones in this article may seem tame to some, but could really turn on a dime if things changed.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Aries-

Good enough point, but remember, sushi actually comes from Korea, apparently. Little known fact.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

Three Japanese guys throw a performance in middle of Seoul asking for peace for both countries.

http://www.koreabang.com/2012/pictures/japanese-buskers-sing-we-love-korea-in-busy-seoul-district.html

The crowd loved them. But I think if three Korean guys did this in middle of Tokyo, they would have been ignored or would have been pushed off by the right winger Japanese.

Two Japanese girls go around Seoul, holding up the Rising Sun flag. But nobody bothers with them.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f87trjMI8gs&eurl=

I bet if Koreans went around Tokyo holding up a Korean flag, they would have been accosted and the Japanese TV news will be reporting about the bad mannered low quality Korean tourists. lol...

-6 ( +2 / -8 )

Pathetic - tho I do not judge all Japan by the actions of a few racist idiots... God knows we have people like that here in the US too

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Fascism is alive and doing very well in 21st Century Japan, and these bully-boy attacks reveal. The sad part is that these attacks took place on August 25th, nearly a month ago, and are oly now being reported. Shades of 1930s Japan, Germany anx Italy. Similar bullying tactics and racism took place in the three "Axis of Evil" powers, as Winston Churchhill described them then) before things took a dramatic turn for theqorse and the result was World War 2. Lets hope this isnt the return to the bad old days tha many people have feared for years. Nations who deny their own history, and try to airbrush over their dirty pasts, are destined to repeat the same mistakes. Sadly, it looks like Japan is poised to follow a very dark path once again. The fact that these cowardly bullyboys used the old Japanese Imperial flag in their attacks is a frightening reminder that underneath the surface in Japan is something that smells really bad....

3 ( +3 / -0 )

As the economic prospects for all Japanese become gloomier it will be the case that these incidents become more prolific.

Yokoso Nippon

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Again, this is the result of Japan's censored educational system. Can you imagine all the Japanese communities in foreign countries being subjected to uneducated host citizens demanding that "Japs get the hell out"!!!. The educated Japanese should rally on the side of the Korean community in Shin Okubo and other ethnic communities throughout Japan. It is disturbing to us in the West to view this unacceptable behavior that denegrates our impression of Japanese culture.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Interestingly, a good fraction of these right wingers, especially those affiliated with yakuza, are ethnic Koreans...

0 ( +1 / -1 )

I live right out here... A group was shouting at store owners in the little cut street of the korean donki hote. I was out with my girl. She was trying to get some cosmetics and the little group ran up on us yelling... I snapped "gitdafuuckoutmyfacewitchobullshiit" and bucked at them... The group fell silent, walked quietly and upright around me, facing me the whole time... Went to the next shop and started yelling... I lol'd

1 ( +1 / -0 )

And people don't realize that a lot of ethnic Koreans have been born in Japan, to parents who were born in Japan, and who have grandparents who were born in Japan. Yet they can't become citizens unless they take a Japanese name and renounce whatever claim they have to Korean citizenship, either in the North or the South. This has been the case for a long long time. And now it's going to get worse for them. There are some advantages to being in a country that believes in birthright citizenship. Except for President Obama, who still is dogged by people who believe he's a Kenyan Muslim in spite of his birth in Honolulu, Hawaii, USA, and his repeated assurances that he's a Protestant Christian.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

Yes, but why pretend to be someone you hate and despise so much? Why not pretend to be a Mongol? A Thai? Any number of other Asians?

Chucky, you should ask that to your fellow Koreans why they set up Japanese restaurants and pretend to be Japanese instead of Korean or other Asian type restaurants. Why to be someone you hate and despise so much?

-1 ( +1 / -3 )

@Chucky and genjuro

Who, apart from yourselves, says that Japanese and Koreans necessarily "hate and despise" each other? The ones I meet certainly don't.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Jefflee:

" It WAS a red-light district... before the Koreans moved in and cleaned it up. When I stayed there in the late 80s it was a dirty, scummy area with awful food, low-priced love hotels, "delivery health" prostitutes, and migrant construction workers, and yes nearly everyone was Japanese at the time. "

Actually, Shin-Okubo still is a red-light district. Just walk past the flashy stores to the back streets. Actually, one of the few areas in Tokyo with actual street prostitution, Western style.

I doubt the right-wingers from the article went past the main strip, though.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Michelle Klein-Hass

" And people don't realize that a lot of ethnic Koreans have been born in Japan, to parents who were born in Japan, and who have grandparents who were born in Japan. Yet they can't become citizens unless they take a Japanese name and renounce whatever claim they have to Korean citizenship, "

That is standard procedure internationally. Many countries do not allow multiple citizenship, or only with conditions. E.g. does Korea allow double Korean/Japanese citizenship? Did you check?

" Except for President Obama, who still is dogged by people who believe he's a Kenyan Muslim in spite of his birth in Honolulu, Hawaii, USA, and his repeated assurances that he's a Protestant Christian. " Obama claimed himself until 2007 that he was born in Kenia, and said so in the introductional booklet from his publisher Acton & Dystel. And about being muslim, every child of a muslim father is muslim, according to islamic law. What child himself believes is irrelevant. So make of all that what you want, but the situation hardly lends itself to a simply talking point.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Michelle Klein-Hass

unless they take a Japanese name

Actually it's a name in Kanji since Japan's only official language is Japnese and does not accept Hagul. Another point is that most Korean sur-names are from China which the Koreans adopted when they were still a vassal state of Ming dynasty so there are not much ethnic Korean names that is still in use today.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

And people don't realize that a lot of ethnic Koreans have been born in Japan, to parents who were born in Japan, and who have grandparents who were born in Japan. Yet they can't become citizens unless they take a Japanese name....

Do people still believe this? You can call yourself whatever you want. You do, of course, have to write your name in kanji or hiragana or katakana, but that's because you're now Japanese. I doubt I'd be allowed to register my kids' names in kanji on their British birth certificates.

And for Koreans, it's even easier given that their names are already in kanji to start with. They don't have to change a thing.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

WilliB

That is standard procedure internationally. Many countries do not allow multiple citizenship, or only with conditions. E.g. does Korea allow double Korean/Japanese citizenship? Did you check?

Japan does allow dual citizenship if you're born into it, but it's just discouraged.

89 countries in the world officially allow some form of dual or multiple citizenship.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

lucabrasi

Do people still believe this? You can call yourself whatever you want.

Of course you can call yourself whatever they want. But people with Korean names in Japan are still discriminated against.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

a child of a muslim father is always muslim, according to islamic law. What child himself believes is irrelevant.

Of course it's relevant. If the child doesn't believe in Islam, then Islamic law is utterly irrelevant as far as the child's concerned.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

does Korea allow double Korean/Japanese citizenship? Did you check?

A check is only a click away. According to wiki, from 1st January 2011 South Korea recognises dual nationality for :

Koreans with multiple nationalities who has vowed his/her intention not to exercise his/her foreign nationality in the Republic of Korea;

Foreign marriage migrants;

Foreigners of outstanding talent who are naturalized as Koreans;

Persons who have their Korean citizenship reinstated by meeting certain qualifications.

Foreigners who are married to Koreans and acquired Korean nationality from July 2, 2010, or later;

Children born in Korea or abroad with one Korean parent;

Foreigners who acquired Korean Citizenship through marriage;

Foreigners with exceptional talent;

Foreigners with important contribution to Korea.

Overseas Koreans at least 65 years of age;

Overseas Korean adoptees.

There are transitional provisions for those who fit under the first category but had already forfeited one nationality.

Those who failed to make a choice and automatically lost Korean nationality can apply to have it restored before May 4, 2012;

Those who choose Korean nationality have until 2016 to reacquire their foreign nationality.

As of December 2010, an application for dual citizenship can only be made inside the Republic of Korea and requires the applicant to currently hold an F-series visa. This would normally be an F-5 visa (Permanent Residency) or an F-4 visa (for former Korean nationals and their descendants, including Korean adoptees) or F-2 or F-3 visa (for spouses of Korean nationals).

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/South_Korean_nationality_law

Would that Japan could see its way to doing the same.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Japan does allow dual citizenship if you're born into it, but it's just discouraged.

Only up to age 22. Apply for a Japanese passport after then and you're required to make a declaration that you do not hold the nationality of any other country.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

E.g. does Korea allow double Korean/Japanese citizenship?

Yes Korea does.

-5 ( +0 / -5 )

tmarie:

" And by that comment will, the bible would also need to be banned then, right? "

Well, if you can find the sort of virulent condemnations and calls for violence against others that the Koran is brimming with, then you can probably make that case for that. I am not a biblical scholar, so I leave that drudge work to you.

Anyway, my point was to show Zichi that the UK´s "hate speech" laws are not a solution, but just a legal loophole waiting to be exploited.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

lol there havent been even one reported protests that have even the slightest possiblity of hurting japanese in korea. well of course in china, and im there right now its kinda getting too crazy here.

well i understand the japanese hatred towards koreans cuz the media is often too resticted and broadcasts information only profitable to japanese gov and nation lol which keads to brainwashing

i asked my japanese friend before whether japan broadcasted Japan declining to go on ICJ with taiwan on the sengaku issue while the jap gov was dissing the korean government for not going on ICJ about the korean japanese island issue. and he said no, he didnt know any about it lol...

and the comfort women issue hmm dont even want to talk abt it lol. how worthless to even say they have nth to do with it..

i can tell well that this article wasnt boradcasted cuz of similar reasons..

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

i asked my japanese friend before whether japan broadcasted Japan declining to go on ICJ with taiwan on the sengaku issue while the jap gov was dissing the korean government for not going on ICJ about the korean japanese island issue. and he said no, he didnt know any about it lol...

What is this kyopo's with their "lol" after their remark?

Do yourselves a favor in learn to read the U.N. Charters about process in which Taiwan can bring this issue to ICJ. It's not about Japan refusing. It's about Taiwan not even doing a damn thing to even start with the process.

i can tell well that this article wasnt boradcasted cuz of similar reasons..

The group in question are Zaitokkai in which many mainstream Japanese media ignores for good reason.

-2 ( +2 / -4 )

"The group in question are Zaitokkai in which many mainstream Japanese media ignores for good reason."

Like what? japanese news ignores reporting about demonstrations based on the group? Interesting.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

"I just hope they won't turn violent like those nationalists in China and Korea"

Dara Danh, I'm afraid you have been misinformed. Allow me to correct your statement, lest others who read your comment also get the wrong idea. While Koreans have demonstrated against the Japanese government in recent years, they have never engaged in organized attacks or physical violence against Japanese nationals or property belonging to Japanese nationals in Korea. Such incidents have occurred in China, but NOT in Korea. And as of today (Feb. 9, 2013), the only incidents involving physical confrontations and personal threats between Japanese and Koreans that I've read about have come from Japanese hatemongers against Koreans in Japan.

-1 ( +4 / -5 )

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