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Will bootleg N Korean 'missile fuel' find its way to Japan?

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Read the news about North Korea or watch the same on TV, and you're bound to see a stream of menacing threats from its rotund leader -- who feels increasingly provoked by international sanctions against his regime. The threats may involve nuclear weapons, or tests of some new type of long-range or short-range missile.

Writing figuratively, monthly subculture magazine Jitsuwa Knuckles (February) puts a new twist on this topic. It relates to what it raunchily refers to as "missiles of the night," which are powered by "Yangchun Samnok." Written with the Chinese characters meaning sun-spring-ginseng-deer, this is the Kim regime's own select formulation of erectile dysfunction medication.

The capsules, in blister packs of 10 to a case, are said to be transported out of the country by North Korean government operatives or private merchants, who peddle it in the Yanbian Korean Autonomous Region in China's Jilin Province, across the Yalu River from Korea. In Yanji and other cities on the Chinese side of the border can be found numerous coffee shops and massage parlors where female escapees from North Korea work off their debts to brokers in the sex trade. It is also here that the male customers seek out the North Korean elixir.

"They're can also be found in the government-operated restaurants where pretty young North Korean women put on music and dance performances," says a local in the know. "Lay out 1,000 Japanese yen for a box of the capsules and you'll receive change."

Reporter Jiro Kanemasa also found boxes of Yangchun Samnok alongside ginseng and other North Korean products in local souvenir shops, as well as in drug stores selling herbal medications. The labeling on the packages identify several different producers of the drug, including the "Korean Ginseng Pharmaceuticals Plant" and the "Sogam Drugstore."

Although the packaged instructions suggest taking "two to three capsules 30 minutes before intercourse," Kanemasa reduced the dosage of just one pill, which he washed down with a cup of water.

Ten minutes later, in the confines of a private cubicle at a massage parlor, he felt a warming sensation and increased heartbeat, and a prelaunch stirring of the missile inside his trousers even before he was able to slip them off.

Within the allotted time he managed to achieve two jousts with his companion. To which he joyously erupted "Mansei" (Korean for banzai).

It appears that in addition to Viagra's active ingredient sildenafil citrate, the North Korean formulation includes native ingredients. Ergo Yangchun Samnok is a preparation where one might say west meets east. To meet international demand, the drug can be found labeled in Korean, Chinese, English and Russian.

"This stuff really does the trick, and it can be purchased over the counter without prescription in Russia, South Korea and China. Sooner or later I suppose it will turn up on the black market in Japan," Kanemasa's local source is quoted as saying.

If there's a downside, it's the realization that outlays for Kim's solid missile fuel may go toward the development of real missiles that are aimed at the U.S. or Japan. And that's a bit of a turn-off, the writer concludes.

© Japan Today

©2020 GPlusMedia Inc.

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I asked a friend in China, who told me it's being sold online via Taobao and other major e-retailers. So North Korea must be exporting it in considerable quantities to supply a market of that size.

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Ok credit where credit is due, I thought I was about to read an article about the North Korean missile program and got a good laugh.

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The stuff works? Glad I can still get it up without a pill!

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At this point, I am not sure that economic sanctions against NK do much except increase the suffering of the NK populace. Kim has nuclear weapons, and he has delivery systems, so he is not likely to be subject to a drone strike, like the one that took out Suleimani. We are back to where we were during the Cold War, where it was understood that anyone using nuclear weapons would be subject to a nuclear counter strike.

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Sounds like free advertisement for the North's equivalent to what China and the South have been selling for years. You can even buy several varieties at Incheon, and the size of the crowds attests to their interest. I guess the North is looking for new sources of income.

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