lifestyle

5 interview questions employers in Japan are no longer allowed to ask

59 Comments
By Audrey Akcasu, RocketNews24

For many young people in Japan, August means summer vacation, festivals and free time. For fourth-year university students however, it means time to start interviewing for jobs. The job-hunting process in Japan is long, grueling and very systematic, culminating in interview after interview for the jobless, soon-to-graduate, young adults.

Interviews can be nerve-wracking for even the most experienced candidates, but Japanese companies don’t always ask the most predictable questions. In fact, some of their questions can be downright weird. Many of these oddball interview questions, however, may not actually be legal.

Governmental labor departments around the country have been amending labor equality laws in an effort to level the playing ground for all candidates and decrease discrimination.

Questions about a thing such as dining habits may seem harmless, but they give the employer a pretty good look into your out-of-work lifestyle and standard of living. The Federation of Economic Organizations thinks that such questions can be discriminatory and should not be asked to potential employees.

Starting this August, employers are no longer allowed to ask questions which don’t relate to applicants’ aptitude for the work or professional duties.

Some of the questions that are now considered “NG” (no good), include:

1. “Where is your parents’ house? Is it north or south of the station?”/“Where is your permanent residence?”

This one was used a lot in the Osaka area until the labor department helped companies make some changes and took it out. It may seem like just a pretty silly question, but it has roots in discrimination against "burakumin." "Burakumin" is an old term for the people on the bottom rung of the social hierarchy, dating back to the feudal days. This group was made up of people who did “impure” jobs, especially those dealing with death, such as executioners, undertakers, butchers, etc. The families of these workers were rejected by the rest of society, heavily discriminated against and often lived in segregated ghettos. With this in mind, job seekers are also advised to not write their family’s background information on personal history documents, such as CVs and resumés. Knowing where someone’s family is from could be a hint to lineage and influence an interviewers opinion of the candidate.

2. “Where does your father work?” / “What level of education did your parents receive?”

While these could also be related to "burakumin" discrimination, labor board consider these unfair because, regardless of the how educated or uneducated the candidate’s family members are, the candidate themselves holds no responsibility for what others have done, thus it should not overshadow their own abilities and achievements.

3. “How many times a month do you eat out?”

As mentioned above, questions such as these show insight to a person or family’s economic status and/or lifestyle standards. The candidate’s economic status is not related to their abilities at work.

4. “What political party do you support?” / “What’s your favorite book?”

Many times questions such as these are used in small-talk to break the ice and make the interviewees a little more relaxed, but an individual’s beliefs and preferences are personal freedoms that should not affect their opportunities in the workforce.

5. “Are you planning on having any kids soon?”

This question targets only women. Many women do indeed quit their jobs once they get married or start having kids, and it’s kind of understandable that companies would prefer to hire someone they know will be around until retirement, in the traditional Japanese salaryman way. However, such questions break gender equality laws, discriminating against young women who might want a family someday. (Not to mention how creepy it would be for the interviewer to ask a young woman if she is single or not).

The funny thing about this whole inappropriate interview question business, is that many of these questions have actually been banned since 1999, with many more amendments being added since 2013. Only now are departments of labor really cracking down on companies to perform fair interviews to all employees.

Source: Asahi Shimbun

Read more stories from RocketNews24. -- ‘”Married Men Don’t Look Happy!” “Wives Unnecessary!”: An Increasing Number of Japanese Men Opting for Bachelorhood -- You’re probably not as genki as this old lady! -- The “doya-gao” phenomenon and where you’re most likely to see it

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59 Comments
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There is so much competition for workers these days nobody cares about these issues anymore. Burakumin? Most young people have never heard of this. And nobody cares. I can only say it is too bad that there was a time when people were concerned about these "issues" and I'm sure a lot of talent was lost because of it.

-2 ( +8 / -10 )

As someone who interviews a lot of people whenever I need new employees these are ok, but trying to screen people to work in a small company where one person effort of lack there of, has a big impact on your business, makes you try your best to select the right candidate. But family background doesn't play a big role in it as opposed to lifestyle. You can tell a lot about the person if you have a little insight into the person lifestyle.

0 ( +5 / -5 )

gokai_wo_maneku, I think most Japanese are well aware of Burakumin, they just deny any knowledge, which is true about older people, too. This is particularly a problem true when it comes to getting married. Remember that most Japanese deny they have any racial prejudice.

22 ( +23 / -2 )

Now a days Japanese companies do not do the lifetime employment like they used to. And women get asked a lot of crappy questions honestly...

6 ( +7 / -1 )

In another 10 or 20 years, the Japanese will have no choice but to either give up on their discrimination or face the complete downfall of their country.

These questions would be considered inappropriate in a third world country, never mind one trying to masquerade as a developed nation.

5 ( +11 / -6 )

Many women do indeed quit their jobs once they get married or start having kids, and it’s kind of understandable that companies would prefer to hire someone they know will be around until retirement, in the traditional Japanese salaryman way.

Why is this always a problem? Japanese working women really have it tough compared to other modern countries when it comes to careers, having/raising kids and being discriminated against in their workplace. As far as promotions and positions at the management-supervisor level, I won't even go there.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

hworta269AUG. 04, 2015 - 08:47AM JST Now a days Japanese companies do not do the lifetime employment like they used to. And women get asked a lot of crappy questions honestly...

That was always the exception rather than the norm with no more than 30% or so of the workforce up through the late 70s to early 80s employed by a major corporation that could offer this.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Huh. I am surprised about so many questions trying to tease out info about parents, maybe because as a foreigner I've never been asked them. I always figured that a candidate who was sufficiently educated for a position coming from less educated, less rich parents could only be a good thing, as it shows that the candidate is ambitious about improving themselves and that they likely had significant support from their hard-working parents in order to move to a higher rung than where they started out. Never occurred to me that there might be some troglodytes out there who thought otherwise.

5 ( +5 / -0 )

Our biracial daughter was asked by a major bookstore a few years back where her father worked, maybe assuming it was the father who was non-Japanese, what her favorite book was, grades at school, not where her parents were from, and she had to write it down on the official application (except her grades),

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Employers asking all these questions but can they legally verify the applicants responses?

0 ( +3 / -3 )

@Aly Rustom. and exactly which developing countries re you talking about? because i'm sure you're not talking about all of them, or even most of them.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

that person: Google is your friend.

In the US, Canada, the EU, Australia, and New Zealand all that is necessary is for the applicant to give full name, social security (or national benefits) number, education history, past employment history, adult criminal convictions, and any relevant awards received in academics or business. Employers cannot ask anything else.

Hope this helps.

6 ( +7 / -1 )

Saw a program on TV a couple of weeks ago where young job-seekers were told to immediately cancel their interviews with any other company if they wanted an offer.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

If you were worried about hiring women because they have children. You would hire women of 40. All women want to have children. Some do not because they want a career. This does not mean they don,t want to have children. Just that their career and lifestyle is more important. So the question 5 should not be ask. What You would ask Is. What is more important to you, Having a career, Having a career and rising a Family or Rising a family. A lot of companies today have free on site children day care centres at their place of work.

-6 ( +1 / -7 )

Employers cannot ask anything else.

Personally, I'm a bit Up-Down on these increasing restrictions on asking just about any question. I can see that they don't want discrimination, BUT you are also blinding the employer (in a sense a customer) from getting anything but the most generic, useless information on a person that he is paying good money on before using him. If he doesn't work out but not quite enough to warrant a firing, he's stuck with him.

We might just as well switch to a system where the companies just report what and how many positions are open and the government just grabs the appropriate number of university or high-school grads and consigns them to the posts. No more interviewing - after all, a bad interview may mean no more than a person not good at being interviewed or not being as studied on modern interviewing tactics or his/her looks just aren't as good.

-2 ( +3 / -5 )

Personally, I'm a bit Up-Down on these increasing restrictions on asking just about any question. I can see that they don't want discrimination, BUT you are also blinding the employer (in a sense a customer) from getting anything but the most generic, useless information

I disagree. When I saw the title of this thread, I was actually a little worried, wondering what I wouldn't be able to ask anymore. But then I saw the questions, and I don't ask any of these questions anyways. My interviews are very detailed however, and after a few fairly major mistakes in my earlier hiring career, I've refined my technique enough that I have a pretty solid rate of hiring good employees. Thinking about the questions I ask, they do not fall into the types of questions discussed in this article. Rather my questions are more based on the person's work ethic, their skills, and their personality. These are the things that should really matter when hiring someone.

If he doesn't work out but not quite enough to warrant a firing, he's stuck with him.

Such is life. They say that 20% of employees will perform exceptionally, 20% will perform poorly, and the remaining 60% will be average. Unfortunately not everyone in the world is a superstar, and when interviewing, you have to choose from the pool of people who apply to work for you (unless you go out and headhunt someone). Sometimes no one in the pool is a superstar, and you just need to make do with what you've got.

2 ( +5 / -1 )

When I interview people, I ask out of the box questions. Fast and innovative, crisis ready contestants stand out.

For Example: 1. What is your favorite color...after they answer, I request them to move on to foods they like with that color. Those that answer black or white get cut immediately as they are not colors. 2. Most people's foot size is different on the left and right. Which shoe size do you prefer? The one too small or the one too big? 3. Who is that guy on the ¥1000 yen note? 4. Tell me about the art in your place...

Thinking out of the box is detrimental to existing happy in this world.

-12 ( +3 / -15 )

Those that answer black or white get cut immediately as they are not colors.

You cut people for answers to some obscure thing that may or may not be true, but goes against what pretty much everyone would commonly believe to be true?

I wonder how many potentially good candidates you've cut with that one.

Personally, I don't have any single questions that result in a cut if the 'wrong' answer is given. Someone could answer entirely wrong to something I'm looking for, but I look at the overall interview and decide from there.

5 ( +9 / -3 )

Japangal: a bit harsh on the favorite color bit. While you may be correct that black/white are technically shades/absence of color you would be an idiot to say something like "My car has no color, its black".

Pre-modern science it was (and still is) considered a color outside of science...even wikipedia's first line is "Black is the darkest color". We even use "black" as an identifier for skin color.

So, basically, rather than writing them off you might want to ask them why black or white is their favorite. You might be impressed with their answer.

If you want to ask solid interview questions, may I recommend the book "How would you move mount Fuji".

3 ( +6 / -2 )

How about, 'are you related to any Burakumin or Ainu? Or words to that affect?

-3 ( +1 / -2 )

So, basically, rather than writing them off you might want to ask them why black or white is their favorite. You might be impressed with their answer.

That's more my style. I like to see where things go.

If you want to ask solid interview questions, may I recommend the book "How would you move mount Fuji".

I'm going to check that out, thanks for the recommendation.

1 ( +4 / -2 )

white and black are indeed colors, and only a moron would not agree with that.

-2 ( +2 / -3 )

All women want to have children.

Lol. Let me guess, you're a man iRL.

3 ( +7 / -3 )

I have been interviewed by several companies in Japan when I was looking of a Job... never remotely heard those questions...

But, in this world you have of everything... I have no doubt that there are several companies (big and small) that still make that kind of questions here in Japan, and also in overseas.

1 ( +4 / -2 )

I can't see what any of those questions have to do with a person's ability to do their job... thank crunchy they dropped them.

0 ( +2 / -1 )

Wonder, why do I have down votes?

Is like admitting that Japan as well as any other place in the world has faults and retrograde persons is a bad thing?

Or should I have to take a stand.. like praising the wonders of one side and disregarding everything from the other... like the position may commentators take in here?, is that it??

-2 ( +3 / -5 )

@Reckless: You are hired.

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

@JapanGal:

The goal of an interview is to find the person best able to work the position you have open. It is not an obscure trivia check, nor is it supposed to be a powertrip for the interviewer.

Unless you are hiring someone where that specific knowledge is relevant, (a scientist working with light, perhaps a photographer or other graphic artist), then you are doing yourself and your company a disservice. Outside of very specific circles it is irrelevant whether or not black is technically a color and therefore irrelevant to your interview.

Of course if in fact it is relevant, then I appologize, although I would like to know more context.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

Burakumin? Most young people have never heard of this.

Mainly because the work 'burakumin' was stamped out about 40 years ago and replaced with 'dowa'. Only English publications use the term burakumin any more.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

Finally worked its way around or something? We were handed a much more comprehensive list for university entrance interviews at least 20 years ago.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

@Daniel Neagari: Don't sweat the down votes. Half the time here down votes are a sign of excellence that makes others uncomfortable.

I really wonder about these people who play all these really elaborate games in interviews. Both the questions about background and these off-the-wall wacky questions to see how well applicants can suss out the interviewer's "creative" train of thought seem like they're more about aggrandizing the interviewer for who they think they are (educated, from the right families, free-thinking) rather than actually gathering meaningful information about the applicant.

1 ( +4 / -2 )

Daniel: Down votes mean as much as up votes. Do not look at them.

Out of the box wacky questions are very important for my purposes.

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

Wow, good thing I don't work for JapanGal.

From wiki:

White is an achromatic color, literally a "color without color", composed of a mixture of all frequencies of the light of the visible spectrum. It is one of the most common colors in nature, the color of sunlight, snow, milk, chalk, limestone and other common minerals.

And it seems JapanGirl is defining black as the absence of light. So here's a puzzler for you: If black is the absence of light, how are you reading this black font?

The only thing worse than a boss who is wrong is one who wilfully imposes his or her ignorance on others.

10 ( +9 / -0 )

Just because you think that if the majority of the people think something is right makes it is, then I would never hire you or people that follow your way of thinking. I think you have just proven the fact that you must be Japanese or very old, and set in your ways.

That doesn't make sense. To pass your 'test', the interviewee would have to have read the same factoid that you have, that says that white and black aren't colors. Knowing or not knowing this factoid doesn't mean that they have any particular way of thinking, or that they are set in their ways, it simply tests whether they have come across this factoid. Now, if the knowledge in question was related to the job at hand, it would make sense to filter based on it, but otherwise it doesn't make sense.

If I were to incorporate this into my questioning, it would go like this:

Me: What's your favorite color?

Interviewee: white

Me: Did you know that white isn't actually a color? Tell me your thoughts on this.

From there I'd gain a lot more insight into the person's way of thinking, and how flexible they are. For example:

Not good reply: "That's ridiculous, of course white is a color" (inflexible, unwillingness to accept new information)

Ok reply: "I don't get it, can you tell me what you mean?" (open minded, willing to admit a lack of knowledge, willing to ask questions in order to bring their way of thinking in line with the interviewer)

Good reply: "Interesting, I suppose I can understand that. White is the absence of color." (Quick thinking, adaptable to the situation, able to use past experiences to understand new situations)

This line of questioning gives insight into how the person reacts to new information that they hadn't known before. Simply testing whether or not they know a factoid only tells you if they have happened to travel a path that has crossed the path you've traveled. It doesn't indicate whether or not they would be a good employee.

-4 ( +2 / -5 )

Nessie: The absence of white allows me to see the font as you type them. Now, if you decided to use white fonts on a white background, I would have to guess what you are writing.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

“Where is your parents’ house? Is it north or south of the station?”/“Where is your permanent residence?”

And the first part has to do with a job because...? Second one is like asking for your address (look at the CV you moron!)

“Where does your father work?” / “What level of education did your parents receive?”

Both parts of this question are none of the company's business. They aren't interviewing the family.

“How many times a month do you eat out?”

You asking me on a date?

“What political party do you support?” / “What’s your favorite book?”

First one, mind your own business. Second one... safe, general question, if a bit pointless.

“Are you planning on having any kids soon?”

This question, more than the others should have the applicant's alarm bells going if she's a lady... it's basically a veiled threat... and not a very good veil.
0 ( +0 / -0 )

Asking about their favorite book or hobby or sport can be quite helpful to an employer.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

In the US, Canada, the EU, Australia, and New Zealand all that is necessary is for the applicant to give full name, social security (or national benefits) number, education history, past employment history, adult criminal convictions, and any relevant awards received in academics or business. Employers cannot ask anything else.

A UK company is now going to stop asking applicants about their degree and A level results as these are no guarantee of being a suitable candidate. Good idea.

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/education/education-news/ey-firm-says-it-will-not-longer-consider-degrees-or-alevel-results-when-assessing-employees-10436355.html

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Let's not miss the forest for the trees here. Japanese companies put where you studied above everything else. None of these other questions matter, which is also what makes the hiring process so messed up here. Then we go down the list - you might've studied at a prestigious university but, if you're a female, you may be exposed to either age discrimination, gender discrimination or a combination of both. I've worked with many people in Japan and I've seen how the process works. It's mostly smoke & mirrors, to be honest.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Thanks!

0 ( +1 / -1 )

I would not move Mt. Fuji as it moves me.

That is a good book Kaynide. I guess they would have loved me to be a part of their interview process. Most people commenting here would not appreciate the way Microsoft goes about interviews, as they think out of the box with no sides as I do. Stranger would fail that interview quickly.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Nessie: The absence of white allows me to see the font as you type them. Now, if you decided to use white fonts on a white background, I would have to guess what you are writing.

Um, if you wrote in blue font inon a blue background, wouldn't it be the same? Are you the HR or do you own a business? Just curious?

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Stranger would fail that interview quickly.

And you base that on the fact that I hadn't read your tidbit about white/black not being colors? Since you are such an adept interviewer, please explain how my not having read that tidbit indicates that I am not able to think outside the box.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Can't remember the last time I interviewed for a job - it was long ago. Judging the comments here, sounds like I've been lucky. I wouldn't want to work for a company that uses gimmicky questions to screen recruits. Frankly, I don't see it working. Large companies like Microsoft can hire a lot of losers before it ever shows on the bottom line.

I'm more of a read between the lines kind of guy. If I get a good feeling about someone and they don't do or say anything stupid, they're hired. I have no need for someone who is just good at linguistic puzzles.

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

@JapanGal: while there is no correct or incorrect answer, they are definitely looking for certain kinds of answers. For example, if you said via dynamite that is literal. One person might say by taking a picture and "moving" it (artistic). Another might say by doung nothing as the Earth is perpetually in motion.

The point is to give a solid answer and explain it. Your answer does not answer the question unfortunately, but due to the nature of the question they would expect you to explain. This flexibility allows for a deeper check in learning how your prospective hire thinks in a short amount if time qhile skimming out as much BS as possible.

Kind of the fun of these questions.

@commanteer:

Part of the method to the madness; the questions are supposed to relate to the job at hand, albeit somewhat abstract so the interviewee can't simply use a canned response.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

How

-6 ( +1 / -7 )

Are they also going to ban pictures and D.O.B. on resumes?

Out of the box wacky questions are very important for my purposes.

@JapanGal: Huh???

.......well, whatever "floats your boat" then. I just have to say that "out of the box" seems very different from "wacky". I think most people would be turned off, and wouldn't want to be hired by such a "wacky" company that asks "wacky" questions at the interview... but then again, maybe that's what you want: "wacky" people...

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

I know I have to thread carefully here for what I'm about to say. After all, a lot of gaijin who are not in eikaiwa, tend to work in recruitment/HR. But I will share my frustration with some of these interview questions anyway.

Most of the above interview questions are plain irrelevant, and yes, they do get asked. Even the (supposedly) more 'modern' companies like Rakutem want to know how many times a month you go eat in a restaurant.

Other interview methods are there just to save effort and time and some companies would do good to review their usage of them. For example, web aptitude testing is big in Japan now. The questions, however, are rarely linked to the content of the job and the result is as scientific as an IQ test in your standard tabloid. Moreover, lots of companies resort to exclusively using aptitude testing to select promising candidates (no face-to-face at all). Such testing lacks all validity and relevance and only serves one purpose: reducing a large number of applicants to a manageable number. They might as well let software do an arbitrary selection, same result and relevance. Moreover, every company in the Tokyo area seems to use the same web altitude test, of which the answers are widely circulated...

As for the Google questions some in this forum seem to champion. E.g. "How would you move amount Fuji?" Please stop asking those. Maybe they're fun to you as an interviewer, but other than being a dad, consider what it tells the applicant about you as an interviewer. First of all, these type of questions are incredibly cliché and there's complete books with nice answers to these. You don't get candidates who are creative, you get candidates who have learnt by hard how to answers these questions. Secondly, as an applicant it tells me HR is into fads and will every now and then completely disrupt the working place to install such fads. HR clearly doesn't just focus on getting the right employee, but rather asks questions that are fun for HR and often to grill applicants. Which brings me to my third point. An interview is a two-way process. Asking these questions can make the applicant feel at high-school again, hindering him or her from asking the questions they want to ask. After all, who doesn't feel treated as a child when they get asked "what else you can do with a straw except for drinking". The best interviews I had -and the best places I worked at- had a normal adult conversation with me where questions were to the point (still touched on professional and personal motivation) and respectful.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

@Tahoochi

I think most people would be turned off, and wouldn't want to be hired by such a "wacky" company that asks "wacky" questions at the interview...

I think so... If an Interviewer asked 5 questions about my favorite things without asking 'why' or my opinions, I might shut up at the third questions and don't care if they will rule me out.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Nessie: The absence of white allows me to see the font as you type them. Now, if you decided to use white fonts on a white background, I would have to guess what you are writing.

If sounds like you're claiming photos are not reaching your eyes from the areas of black font (black being the absence of light). If so, you'd be incorrect.

Um, if you wrote in blue font inon a blue background, wouldn't it be the same? Are you the HR or do you own a business? Just curious?

The implied claim is that black is not a color because it's the absence of light. In fact, light is coming from the black font on your screen. By the definition of "black as the absence of light", there are few things, if any, natural or artificial, that fit that definition of black.

I'm not in HR but I do own a business.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

@Hildi

As for the Google questions some in this forum seem to champion. E.g. "How would you move amount Fuji?" Please stop asking those.

I like being asked that kind of questions while interview. It makes me more comfortable to talk openly rather than asking my favourite things.

You don't get candidates who are creative, you get candidates who have learnt by hard how to answers these questions

I don't think so. Every answer would be different and interesting and I believe there's no wrong answer about that. It's just to know how a person can take under pressure.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

The implied claim is that black is not a color because it's the absence of light. In fact, light is coming from the black font on your screen. By the definition of "black as the absence of light", there are few things, if any, natural or artificial, that fit that definition of black.

I'm not in HR but I do own a business.

Well, that question wasn't directed at you. Furthermore, I was pointing out the fact that having blue font on a blue background will cause the reader to "guess" as the original poster was trying to point out regarding her explanation.

The absence of white allows me to see the font as you type them. Now, if you decided to use white fonts on a white background, I would have to guess what you are writing.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

@Hildi, you are missing the point of questions like the Fuji ones. Google etc create new questions similar to that but very random. For example, "How many hairstylists are there in the world?" Or "when planning a party, would you order hamburgers or pizza?"

It is indeed a silly question, but it reveals a lot about how the interviewee thinks. For example, if they take forever and a day to answer me on several questions, then I should expect similar results if a customer asks a question over the phone. That is, it is not good for customer service as I want someone who can think on their toes. Similarly if they answer the Fuji question with answers I have already seen in the book then I can simply ask them another question. (which BTW a good interviewer should prepare their own material to be honest; fuji is just an example/template)

Again, deaigning open ended questions with high relevance to the job is the key. In Eikaiwa, I imagine more roleplay style questions are better (how to deal with bullying, monster parents, etc).

Also, +1 to general comuter aptitude. There is so much information out there that can be grabbed much me efficiently than having to bother the manager every 20 minutes. In my company general computer knowledge is a huge plus.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Unless asking these questions brings severe punishment to the company they will keep asking them I'm afraid, especially as they are hiring for life. They might pay someone 200 - 1000 million yen over their employment and the amount of business that person might be expected to conduct could be 10 or 100x that, so unless the fine is of that order of magnitude they won't worry.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

I think HR people should be fired from what I see above.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Depends on the HR person. They fit this breakdown as well:

They say that 20% of employees will perform exceptionally, 20% will perform poorly, and the remaining 60% will be average.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

@ Hildi

Couldn't agree more. This kind of questioning has been trendy years ago, however HR and big companies start to understand how counterproductive it is. This kind of questioning often comes from inexperienced or stuck in the past interviewers. Conversations, deep position discussion are way more productive for both parties.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

I'm always pretty good at the job but suck at interviews..,,,

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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