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Conductor gives heartwarming message on train’s final run

8 Comments
By Krista Rogers, RocketNews24

A Japanese train conductor’s final announcement aboard a train about to be transferred to Jakarta, Indonesia hit some passengers right in the feels.

On December 6, the final 205-0 series train set to be put into operation in Jakarta, Indonesia pulled into Musashi-Nakahara Station on the JR Nambu Line for the last time.

This past April, JR East announced that it would be transferring 120 205-series train cars from the JR Nambu Line, which connects Tokyo and Kawasaki, to Jakarta’s KA Commuter Jabodetabek commuter rail system. While the last of these trains being sent to Indonesia was retired from Japanese service on December 6, a single 205 series train will remain in service on the Nambu Line until January 9, 2016.

Jakarta has been actively acquiring used Japanese trains since the year 2000, when the Toei Mita Line donated a train that was being decommissioned to the Indonesian capital. The KA Commuter Jabodetabek has since purchased approximately 500 used 205 series train cars (a figure that includes this latest shipment) from Japanese railway companies to fill a growing urban need. In fact, the majority of the current rolling stock in Indonesia’s metropolitan capital area originally saw service in Japan. In addition to supplying the trains themselves, JR East has also provided the country with engineering maintenance, operational support, and management advice as special services.

Regarding the final trip of the last 205 series Nambu Line train set to be transferred overseas, the conductor on board made a special announcement as the train approached its terminal location of the day at Musashi-Nakahara Station. Passengers on the train at the time reported feeling incredibly moved by his words, and Twitter users uploaded comments such as “His speech touched me” and “I cried out loud” for the rest of the world to see.

Here’s what the train conductor had to say on that final run: “This train that you are currently riding will retire as of today from service on the JR Nambu Line. It will continue active service from here on in Jakarta, Indonesia. We will arrive at the Musashi-Nakahara Station terminus in a few moments. Please make sure that you take all of your belongings with you as you exit the train. We sincerely hope that you take all of your happy memories of being on this train home with you for safekeeping as well.”

After Twitter comments about his announcement blew up in popularity, JR East released a statement of their own: “It’s true that one of our conductors made a speech like this on December 6, the last day of service for the train in question. His words were not just to thank the final train, however. He wanted to express his thanks to all of the passengers that have used the 205 series trains over the years. We are very grateful to have received such a warm response to his message.”

It’s unknown whether news of the conductor’s announcement has made it to Jakarta, but the city will be receiving this final train with its interior decorated with pictures of the 205 series as colored by Japanese kindergarteners and pre-schoolers. What a warm send-off to a new era of service in a new country.

Source: Yahoo! Japan News

Read more stories from RocketNews24. -- West Japan’s new sleeper train looks more luxurious than most hotels -- Free Wi-Fi now available on Tohoku Shinkansen, inside Tokyo’s Yamanote Line stations -- Better know a train nerd: 36 different classifications for Japan’s “densha otaku”

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8 Comments
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Does Indonesia have the narrow Japanese gauge on its railways? Or will all the bogeys need to be re-done before use I wonder.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Now the Japanese travel documentaries will be able to go somewhere closer than South American cities to be able to show used Japanese commuter rolling stock in use in exotic locations.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Looking forward to riding that train!

1 ( +1 / -0 )

That used to be my stop. I miss Musashi Nakahara. Next time I go to Japan, I should stop by and see how much it has changed in the last 4 years.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

A Japanese train conductor’s final announcement aboard a train about to be transferred to Jakarta, Indonesia hit some passengers right in the feels.

What does that even mean?

Here’s what the train conductor had to say on that final run: “This train that you are currently riding will retire as of today from service on the JR Nambu Line. It will continue active service from here on in Jakarta, Indonesia. We will arrive at the Musashi-Nakahara Station terminus in a few moments. Please make sure that you take all of your belongings with you as you exit the train. We sincerely hope that you take all of your happy memories of being on this train home with you for safekeeping as well.”

I love that... I wish more people were like this.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

What does that even mean?

I'm not sure but it sounds better than Ode to Outdated Rolling Stock.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

A Japanese train conductor’s final announcement aboard a train about to be transferred to Jakarta, Indonesia hit some passengers right in the feels.

What does that even mean?

Welcome to social networking slang. "Feels" is the current term for anything that generates strong emotions of sympathy, sadness, longing, happiness, etc. In this case, the usage refers to a fictional organ of the body responsible for those emotions, resulting in an outpouring of those emotions.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

@theeastisred : I'm Indonesian living in Jakarta. I use those trains regularly to hang around. Yes, we use same gauge as Japan do.

We are Jakarta people happy with those trains. Comfortable, smooth and cool.

Indonesia has train factory in Solo city. Still buying used trains from Japan are very very much cheaper than we build for ourselves. If we build one train, it is cost 10 used trains from Japan. Then you can imagine why we choose to buy the used ones.

Surprisingly, those used trains are very reliable, with relatively low maintainence cost.

At the end. The consumers PAY MUCH CHEAPER TICKETS for the commuter system. It's only 5000 Rupiahs (50 yen ) for approx. 40 km distance.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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