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Doolittle's Raid survivors hold 70th reunion in U.S.

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Amazing story. Barve men.

0 ( +3 / -3 )

I should say brave.

0 ( +3 / -3 )

Did any women or children die in the raids. If so, what are they celebrating?

-6 ( +6 / -12 )

Did any women or children die in the raids.

Why does this matter?

-1 ( +5 / -6 )

Why does this matter?

Considering that it was the indiscriminate US strategic bombing of Japanese residential and industrial areas that brought upon its surrender, the death of women and children are very relevant.

-9 ( +3 / -12 )

Why does this matter?

Considering that it was the indiscriminate US strategic bombing of Japanese residential and industrial areas that brought upon its surrender, the death of women and children are very relevant. The memories of how the US can rain death anywhere and any amount will keep Japan in its places and preserve the peace. The Dolittle raids was the forerunner of all that.

-8 ( +2 / -10 )

"Did any women or children die in the raids. If so, what are they celebrating?"

You could easily do some research online and find out the answer yourself. If you wish to conduct a mock trial of a bunch of 90-95 year-old US war veterans on the grounds that they are war criminals, go right ahead, but just do it directly.

7 ( +8 / -1 )

The Dolittle raid infuriated the Japanese military and pushed them into making hasty plans for their attack on Midway in June 1942, at which Japan lost four of its front-line aircraft carriers to the loss of one by the U.S. This was the first major defeat by the Axis powers in WW2, since the Battle of Stalingrad didn't begin until one month later.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

This was the first major defeat by the Axis powers in WW2,

No it wasn't. In the Battle of Britain, 1940, the Nazis were defeated in their attempt to invade the British Isles. Are you American?

1 ( +4 / -3 )

Did any women or children die in the raids. If so, what are they celebrating?

Maybe. They are celebrating the first successful mission against an enemy. In war, people die. That's the point. Sometimes they are women and sometimes, unfortunately, children. The dead at Pearl Harbor included:

Yaeko Oda, age 6

Nancy Arakaki, age 8

Matilda Faufata, age 12

Shirley Hirasaki, age 2

Janet Ohta, age 3 months

Barbara Ornellas, age 8

Eunice Wilson, age 7 months

Rowena Foster, age 3

I don't know about the Doolittle aviators, but if they are anything like the veterans I have met on both sides of the Pacific War, they were not happy that children died, but realized that it is sometimes unavoidable. Especially when the soldiers use children as human shields (such as the Japanese soldiers in the battle of Okinawa).

9 ( +13 / -4 )

Yaeko Oda, age 6

Nancy Arakaki, age 8

Shirley Hirasaki, age 2

Janet Ohta, age 3 months

Enemy aliens, the lot of them.

-7 ( +0 / -7 )

No more names please.

Great men! Thanks guys.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

Enemy aliens, the lot of them. Yeah, you have to watch out for those 3 month olds. Turn your back and they'll gun you down with no warning.

Considering that it was the indiscriminate US strategic bombing of Japanese residential and industrial areas that brought upon its surrender, the death of women and children are very relevant.

Sounds like your chronology is all twisted. The indiscriminate bombing of civilians didn't happen until much later in the war. This run was purely symbolic and really DID target industries, not residential areas. Even so, not much damage was dealt. It was mostly the Japanese belief in their invincibility that was damaged.

2 ( +4 / -2 )

Badly written and confusing article but interesting nevertheless. How sad to be down to four survivors. Shaking Japanese military over-confidence was probably seen as a vital move at the time, even if it was a largely symbolic raid.

5 ( +6 / -1 )

NeverSubmit

Did any women or children die in the raids. If so, what are they celebrating?

They may well have! And your point is exactly? Did any women and children die during Japanese bombing of China in the decade leading up to this attack. Did any women and children die during the Japanese attacks during its advance, Hong Kong, Singapore, Manila, D.E.I, etc etc. Well??? Or do your moralistic rules only apply to one side?

0 ( +5 / -5 )

Truly the greatest generation, we must never forget them. Men and Women of that time did more for the world then most today ever dream of doing, we live the life we have today because of their sacrifice.

1 ( +4 / -3 )

The B-25 was a cool looking plane though.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

Bombings of civilians started in the Spanish Civil War and continued after that. If you lived near a target of some military importance (munitions factory, port, railroad head, military base, fuel dump, etc) you were at risk.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Yes, women and children died in the raids.

And the women at the time were also having babies for the express purpose of sending them to war, and children were learning how to use bayonets to use against Americans in a fight to the death. Not to mention the many women who killed themselves in Okinawa and Saipan.

There are no words appropriate to describe how horrible that war was. But he guys mentioned in the article are heroes and no doubt wish that their fallen comrades never had to go to war and could have just married their sweethearts and lived happily ever after. Instead they died saving their country so that people could type ridiculous things on their computers.

0 ( +4 / -4 )

I know the Doolittle Raid killed 50 people, but I can't find any info on how many were civilians.. I read that six schools were damaged. I heard one was destroyed. But they were not targeting schools? Is six an accident or something? Not exactly. At the very best they just didn't really give a damn. I do give them slack for being in a very tough situation though. Not exactly hyper bombing accuracy at the time.

But I feel no need to smooth over the fact that they bombed schools. Its ugly, and I would consider it unforgiveable if they could have been more accurate. But I don't think they could. It might have even been hard for them to distinguish between schools and factories as well, but again, I doubt they cared as they really could not do anything about it.

As for civilian dead at Pearl Harbor, sorry, but the IJA has plenty of stain on it for failing to declare war on time (although I don't think it was intentional). Civilians killed on a military base are all fair game. If you don't want to die, don't walk on one. Its that simple. And all if not most killed outside the base were hit by American AA fire. No kidding. In fact, I would not be surprised if most civilian deaths in the Doolittle Raid were by Japanese AA fire. That was simply the state of WWII.

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

Did any women or children die in the raids. If so, what are they celebrating?

Due to your point about women and children, I gave you a thumbs up. That is more important than any other concern, no matter how much people adopt a mentality of never-ending excuses.

But what I must impress upon you, NeverSubmit, is that these men were NOT celebrating, not by a long shot. Unlike the (insert explicatives here) that firebombed Tokyo and other civilian cities and nuked Hiroshima and Nagasaki, I have at least some respect for the Doolittle Raiders.

Did any women and children die during Japanese bombing of China

That right there is the excuse mentality I was talking about. The women and children are never responsible for what soldiers did. You cannot blame them for what soldiers did. Soldiers do not take orders from civilian women and children. If vengeance is what you want, you don't go after the women and children. You go after the killers, the ones who committed the wrong, as best you can, PERIOD, or else you are a scumbucket.

-3 ( +1 / -4 )

I'm proud of these men. They served their country with honor. I salute them for their bravery.

2 ( +6 / -4 )

Old technology is not as good as more modern technology. We can't judge their tech based on what we can do nowadays. Older tech is not as precise, bombs weren't smart, soldiers were too preoccupied just keeping themselves alive while trying to hit their targets using cruder equipment. War is always hell. Pretty sure every nation's war of liberation/unification and founding fathers have their fair share of civilian damage - yet nations still celebrate them, because otherwise their nation wouldn't exist in the first place. So everybody in war had dirty blood.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

@Nippon Nation (the display name, not the people)

Why can't we celebrate the attacks on Pearl Harbour? After they all, this is a Japan syndicated news media " JT" Why can't we recognize the survivors from the era - Japanese pilots, so forth and so on. Why worship these men and make them out to be heroes when they were simply murderers following orders. This is Japan, let the Japanese recognize their soldiers too! And have it entered on this online newspaper.

Celebrate and honor the men not the attacks nor the Governments that sent them there. Us and Japanese Vets meet in Pearl Harbor every anniversary in peace to honor the fallen of both sides in that attack. The Doolittle's Raid survivors 70th reunion is to honor the men that where sent on a suicide mission and only made it back to their families by pure selfwill not to Honor the US government, the government sent them to die. When you base the loss of life only on Nationality only you are only disgracing those who died Japanese ,American, or any Nationality. When you see men standing side by side before enemies now at peace Honoring their fallen brothers together you will understand this. "Its not to Celebrate the attacks and how many "enemies" they killed, but to remember those that died and those that lived, and to make sure the next generations never forget, so that the world my never fall into darkness again" (what my Grandpa told me every memorial day as a child) . This is why these Men and Women will always be the Greatest Generation.

2 ( +4 / -2 )

@tyler Vendenberg - This article is about the Dolittle Raids and the men behind that attack - senseless attack. The Dolittle Raid was not a suicide mission. The rest is your spin, like the ' god & country' most vets shout. It's hypocrisy. This article should not glorify these pilots on a Japanese syndicated news platform. It is disrespectful. The victims should be remembered, not the killers who did it! The world has truly entered a new Dark Age.

-7 ( +2 / -9 )

@Nippon Nation (the display name, not the people)

Please thell us how many Civilians and Japanese soldiers died that day, that we can remember them too. We are not here to be disrespectful, how many people would have thought about the Doolitte Raid today and the people that died if this article wasn't here?

1 ( +3 / -2 )

It would be interesting for them to visit yaskuni jinja to see the kamikaze replica planes there

0 ( +2 / -2 )

Nippon Nation

This article is about the Dolittle Raids and the men behind that attack - senseless attack.

Yes this article is about the raid and the brave men who flew this raid. As for your claim it was a senseless attack, how exactly do you come to that conclussion. The US was at war with Japan, mind you a war Japan started so who exactly was it senseless?

The Dolittle Raid was not a suicide mission. The rest is your spin, like the ' god & country' most vets shout. It's hypocrisy.

Really! The fact they flew aircraft that where not designed for this operation, they removed defensive weapons to save weight, they flew knowing they didnt have the range to make their safe landing areas. How is that not a suicide mission? And these men volunteered for this mission not out of some ludicrous belief in their god emperor or afterlife but because the job needed to be done. Now thats heroism.

This article should not glorify these pilots on a Japanese syndicated news platform. It is disrespectful.

Why should this not be remembered it is good that most modern Japanese are open enough to recognise this for what it is a group of men who did something extraordinary and are not celebrating the killing but remembering their fallen mates. That is a massive difference but something you will not understand.

The victims should be remembered, not the killers who did it! The world has truly entered a new Dark Age

I agree the 50 killed and 400 wounded should be remembered as should the 3 crew executed after surrendering and the 250,000 chinese that where killed in reprisal for assisting the men escape the Japanese. All victims not just the Japanese should be remembered.

0 ( +4 / -4 )

You can see the same zero's at many other museums.

Just a plane like civil war weapon is just another gun. On same token boycott anything done by Studio Gibhli as the Miyazaki family produced wing-tips for Zero planes during WWII.

Should I boycott any GE, etc too as they bombarded my home-country?

Should I hate Italians, Turks, etc as they invaded my country centuries ago and thus refuse to buy their products?

Where does it end? It ends with us and accepting that the past is the past and it is time to move on.

If I want to hate someone I sure as hell can find a reason for it and what does it make me? Just another hater and war-monger.

-4 ( +2 / -6 )

I'm proud of these men. They served their country with honor. I salute them for their bravery.

Bravery? Yes? Honor? Not all that much. I would call it honor if they kept their bombings strictly to bases and other pure military targets. Going for factories is not honor nor is it dishonor, its just understandable. Not much sympathy for workers making weapons during a war of aggression, but its not honor to kill them either. One should expect that other civilians would have had time to get to shelters at least. I give the men of the Doolittle Raid that much slack.

But my understanding with regards to dropping bombs in civilian centers ends when civilian cities are firebombed or worse, and there is no possibility of escape. That is just slaughter of civilians, pure and simple, and refusal to accept that is naught but lying to oneself. All that do that are scum.

-1 ( +3 / -4 )

It's hardly a private moment when you've invited the media and given them pictures toasting each other. Considering the civilian deaths this is distasteful. A private get together out of the eyes of the media would have been more appropriate.

-1 ( +3 / -4 )

scotchegg

It's hardly a private moment when you've invited the media and given them pictures toasting each other. Considering the civilian deaths this is distasteful. A private get together out of the eyes of the media would have been more appropriate.

Let me ask you this then if you find this event so distasteful. How do you feel about the shrine in Tokyo commemorating Japanese war dead or the millions that flock to this each year including politicians and other important figures? What are your thoughts on this, is this distasteful afterall it is honoring men who killed not 50 people but millions? Or do you reserve your distaste for selected people? These guys if you read the article and understand the history are not celebrating the bombing. They are holding a commemoration to the people involved, their friends the ones that died in the action and the ones who have passed since and the Chinese who helped them to survive. They are not celebrating the bombing of Japan at all and that is where you are getting all confused...

1 ( +4 / -3 )

a war Japan started

Cletus, you don't know history. The Pacific War was started by US.

-8 ( +2 / -10 )

Pacific war did start when the US cut off oil supplies to Japan, gotta love black gold

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

Readers, the subject is the reunion of Doolittle's Raiders. From here on, posts that do not focus on that will be removed.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

The Doolittle Raid didn't kill nearly as many people or do nearly as much damage as the March 9-10 1945 raids.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

I wonder if posters here ever read Dolittle's famous book, "Thirty Seconds over Tokyo" (or anything else). The raid didn't expect to do serious damage, its purpose was psychological -- both by boosting morale in the US and by making the Japanese military aware how difficult it was going to be to defend their home islands.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

The raid didn't expect to do serious damage, its purpose was psychological

I doubt the people blown up consider what happened to them to not be serious damage, but only psychological. It truly bothers me the way males, especially the war supporting kind, are so focused on the macro that they forget about the micro, such as the people who die. Its always Japan this, and America that, as if they were just some guys brawling in the street. Nuke a city and its like one of those guys lost a finger. No. Civilians die and its murder.

Again, I dont put the Doolittle Raid on that level, but I sure am not going to deny that it was a small beginning of America playing the role of the Germans and Italians at Guernica, only at Kobe, Tokyo, Hiroshima and Nagasaki.

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Doolittle_Raid

By demonstrating that Japan itself was vulnerable to American air attack, it provided a vital morale boost

The Doolittle Raid was to boost moral and terrorize the enemy.

4 ( +5 / -1 )

Why celebrate or glorify the pain and suffering of others.

Imagine a 75 year old survivor of these raids remembering his 6 year old sister who perished in a gruesome death because of these bombs and now people are celebrating his sister's death.

For the people who burnt to death these certainly weren't "Do-Little" raids.

And it's nothing worth celebrating.

1 ( +4 / -3 )

And all if not most killed outside the base were hit by American AA fire. No kidding.

This is a true statement. What people tend to forget is all that AA lead thrown up into the air WILL come back down - somewhere. I've seen pictures of cars on Hawaii that were holed by spent rounds that fell on them. Remember that the rest of the island thought it just was a realistic drill until the smoke started billowing heavily. They continued on with their lives not realizing that they should be taking cover. I wonder if the same was true in Tokyo when the B-25's blew through?

0 ( +2 / -2 )

If your job is to make armor plate for gun mounts, then your place of employment is a legitimate military target regardless of the fact that you are a civilian. If you're shift is "on" when the facility is attacked, then it sucks to be you. There's nothing fascist about it. They're targeting the building, not individual people.

Even in this day and age of precision-guided weapons, there's no way to guarantee that truly innocent civilians aren't killed (euphemistically termed "collateral damage"). NO. WAY. What's improved immensely with the introduction of precision weapons is the reduction in the amount of "collateral damage." Instead of bombing 14 blocks to hit one factory, the factory can be taken out with only a few bombs.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

Actually they were heroes because they were on a guaranteed one-way mission with little-to-no odds for success... never mind survivability. The goal wasn't physical damage so much as it was psychological damage. They demonstrated that the Japanese homeland CAN be reached and attacked by the enemy. Had they all been shot down by Japanese defenses, the mission would have been a failure. That kind of courage in the face of adversity can be appreciated by almost anyone, even people in Japan.

Take for example, Pearl Harbour. By all accounts of history it was regarded as a success, yet the men who planned and carried out the attacks are not remembered for their bravery, audacity, and valor! No one knows off the top of their heads who commanded the operations on Pearl Harbour.

Without Googling it, I know Adm. Yamamoto was the one tasked with the plan for Pearl Harbor and one of his comments proved all too accurate. "I fear we have awakened a sleeping tiger." Rather than a success, by all accounts, the attack on Pearl Harbor was an abject FAILURE for the following reasons:

Not a single U.S. carrier took even a machine gun round of damage. None of the fuel oil tanks on the base were damaged in any significant way. The shipyard was virtually ignored in the attack allowing most of the damaged ships to be repaired quickly, and finally The attack resulted in Japan having to face the industrial might of the United States ultimately leading to their downfall.

Had Japan not attacked, who knows if the U.S. would have ever got off their butt?

The pilots of the Pearl Harbor attack were not on one-way missions (at least not intentionally) and were expecting to attack bases that were not at war on a day (Sunday) where everyone was expected to sleep in. Contrast that with the Doolittle B-25's that were entering a country that had been fighting for a decade. So when you look at it closely, the two attacks only have the fact that they were carrier launched in common. That's not enough to call for equal veneration.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

The Dolittle Raids was no suicide mission. These men weren't kamikaze, so stop making them out to appear like they were prepared to commit suicide when they clearly weren't.

-5 ( +1 / -6 )

It is disrespectful. The victims should be remembered, not the killers who did it! The world has truly entered a new Dark Age.

Why celebrate or glorify the pain and suffering of others.

You're both missing the point, and not surprisingly. The crowd that wears their anti-war stance on their sleeves like some sort of liberal badge of courage seem to intrinsically forget - or more likely ignore through ignorance or lack of intelligent thought - that the celebration of what we consider heroism in war is not a celebration of war itself. It is realized - and most notably by the veterans themselves - that war is a horrible, tragic and evil exercise of man which should be visited upon no worthy civilization. Those that saw their young friends die, witnessed death, and yes even killed others themselves realize this far more than the rest of us ever can. I would point out that sometimes war is a horrible but necessary act to preserve the death of humanity or at least a more noble cause (preventing genocide comes to mind).

The point is not that these people are heroes for bombing and killing other, but that they are heroes for having the strength and courage to fight for the cause in which they believed. In the west we happen to think that the defeat of fascism and Imperialism was a noble cause. So yes, these men are heroes. That you might not believe in their cause does not make them less so to those who do. If you want to think that the Japanese Army were heroes because you are Japanese, that is your right. I should hope that you might think this of units who fought nobly on the field of battle rather than those throwing babies on bayonets in China, or lopping off POW's head on Bataan, but to each his own.

Yes war is horrible, and the acts committed during war designed to kill people are not noble, but the human spirit and courage that cause men/women to persevere through it is worthy of praise. If you would suggest through your denunciation of all who participated in war as murderers or immoral then I would conclude that you have lived a lucky life in which you have never found yourself in a situation that might require such a choice, and the heroism to see it through.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

The Dolittle Raids was no suicide mission. These men weren't kamikaze, so stop making them out to appear like they were prepared to commit suicide when they clearly weren't.

Oh I wouldn't DREAM of implying the men of Doolittle's crews would be so cowardly as to commit suicide. The Doolittle crews had a good chance to survive the mission if it went EXACTLY as planned. Of course, that chance dropped considerably when they were launched farther away from Tokyo than planned because of suspicion that a Japanese trawler had radioed the carrier's location before being sunk. They were well aware that from their ultimate launching point they had no chance to reach their intended airfields in China. The amended plan was to get as far as they could, then ditch or belly land if possible. Some made it to mainland China and survived, some didn't. One survived only to be executed once taken prisoner. Not a suicide mission by any means, but certainly a one-way mission by definition and one in which survival was chancy at best.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

So much Chamberlain appeasers; sometimes ya gotta fight the good fight, even if civilians can unfortunately get in the way at times, when the alternative is much worse. War is always hell, but there's lower levels of hell that's worse than war. And when somebody simply stops selling you oil (they're not obligated to sell you oil), you don't just come out and fight - you go negotiate; otherwise, what happens if Iran cuts oil, then Iran is the war starter.

From now on, japanese people should celebrate every december 7. The Pearl Harbor Raid.

If Japan even teaches it in school in the first place, since if they teach it, they would teach that Japan was definitely the military aggressor, and it would remind them that they suffered losing the war due to something that they started. And that's why they don't celebrate it; ya don't celebrate something that directly led to ya losing the war.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

You still miss the point; they aren't celebrating that they killed people in a time of war. They are celebrating that they accomplished what had to be done and lived through it.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

@tigermohII - However way you or the journalist word it makes no difference. These vets are reveling in their success which saw to the murder of non-combatants, most of which were old men, women, and babies. Had they failed to reach their targets, and had survived, they would not be celebrating, and they most certainly wouldn't be on the front page of JT. Their success meant achieving " shock & awe!" It's how JT skews it, along with the press that makes it appear that they only did it for their friends. The man who was beheaded deserved it! The Japanese should hail that man a hero. That would be fair reporting, not this Anglo-worship garbage press.

-5 ( +0 / -5 )

Pattycakechampion and Neversurrender, Japan lost any semblance of protection from harm when the Japanese Army began murdering and raping thousands of Chinese in Nanking. The mindset at that time in the beginning of the war was already "Total War", and Japan was going to reap the whirlwind from their own actions.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

@ singularitydoliman>>>China has nothing to do with this discussion. You are totally off topic!

-5 ( +0 / -5 )

Nippon Nation

China has nothing to do with this discussion. You are totally off topic!

China has everything to do with this discussion, it is even mentioned in the article my friend and while you bitterly complain about the 50 poor Japanese who died due to this raid you say nothing about the estimated 250,000 Chinese massacred as a direct result of this raid. Innocent Chinese women and children whose only crime was being in the area where the US airmen where and escaped from. I find it interesting that you are bitter about 50 people dying but remain silent about the 250,000 dead killed by your on countrymen as a result. I think that in itself speaks volumes.....

0 ( +1 / -1 )

I still don't understand the concept that children are willing and complicit participants in the geopolitical decisions of their governments.

Could you look at a 5 year old girl you just lost her arm from a bomb and say "Too Bad, it's your fault, you shouldn't have invaded China".

I'm not offering any better solution to world war 2 I'm just saying that we should celebrate these tragedies with balloons and high fives.

For every "success" on one side is pain and sorrow on the other.

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

The man who was beheaded deserved it!

What, do you still follow some Bushido nonsense that surrender is 'dishonorable'? Or is it just your pathetic attempt at trying to implicate that any participant in war is guilty of crimes against humanity and deserves to die? If that is your outlook I hope for your sake that you get to rest in your comfortable home without ever having to fight for the right to continue doing so. Naivete to the point of blind, head in the sand stupidity is not a trait I should think one would be proud of. It's great to imagine some utopia where there are no power-seekers and abusers, and therefore no reason for war. This place isn't one of those. Human nature, whether American, Japanese, German or Peruvian is flawed and there will always unfortunately be the need to keep what we settle on as a reasonable version of 'freedom' safe from those abusers. Thank God, Buddha, Allah - pick one - that we have men like these who do possess the courage in time of need. Thank the same that we never have to depend upon people like you who sanctimoniously just reap the benefits. But your the typical Japanese 'we aint do nuffin' guvna' type so go figure. You seem to be offended that this story is placed on JT, but that is an editorial decision for their staff, not the fault of the men in the story.

I'm not offering any better solution to world war 2 I'm just saying that we should celebrate these tragedies with balloons and high fives.

Again - and apparently I could say this a million times with no effect - when these men celebrate, or are celebrated it is not because of the people that they killed or the property and lives destroyed. It's not a celebration of war itself or some sort of wild victory celebration (although the victors were certainly entitled to it when it was all over) with 'high-fiving'. It's a celebration amongst themselves that they did survive. And a celebration of sorts for the memory of the comrades lost. And it's a celebration of the suffering, fear and loss - and often subsequent courage in doing their bit and surviving that is celebrated.

I find this current trend - likely more amongst the younger more liberal crowd - of wanting to classify the men and women who fought in the Second World War, or any other military conflict as 'murderers' and 'war criminals'. You seem to have no realistic grasp of human history, which is incredibly dangerous.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

I want to apologize for my earlier comment about enemy aliens. I was being sarcastic at the notion that the US would count Nikkei-American dead during WWII as their own, considering how FDR and Edgar Hoover labelled all of them as "enemy aliens". I have no doubts about Japanese-American loyalty, knowing that the greatest living US statesman Daniel K. Inouye is one of them who lost his arm fighting against the Germans with the 442nd.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Nations celebrate the men of D-Day, don't they?

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Lot of civilians died on June 6th.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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