lifestyle

Eating on trains: Survey asks 'How much is too much?'

57 Comments
By Philip Kendall

With some of the busiest stations in the world and a population that increases by more than 2 million during the daytime as people pour into the city, Tokyo relies heavily on its bus and rail networks. Crammed into those little metal tubes, sometimes for hours each day, commuters soon learn to cope with being pushed, shoved and having their personal space reduced to the few inches of space around their face.

People soon learn what is and is not acceptable on public transport, and while socially-aware conduct like switching mobile phones to silent mode and giving up seats to elderly or disabled passengers are stipulated by in-train notices or audio announcements, there remains a handful of other, often unspoken, rules that people must adhere to or else incur the wrath of irritated passengers as they glare, tut and grumble in their direction.

Listening to music too loudly through headphones; reading sexually explicit manga; not removing a backpack during the rush hours; all are considered rude on-board trains. But there’s a special rung in commuter Hell reserved for those who eat and drink during their journey.

Japanese new site Netallica investigates the results of a recent survey into eating and drinking on-board trains, asking the question: how much is too much?

Can we sneak a quick bite of a sandwich between stops? Is popping a tiny cookie in your mouth acceptable, or are you likely to end up strung up outside Shibuya station with “glutton” painted across your naked belly?

The debate began when an anonymous Internet user on information hub Goo asked the question: “Where is the line when it comes to eating and drinking on trains?”

Naturally, the responses flooded in with people of all ages and walks of life offering their opinions, with many stipulating that it depends on what exactly is being consumed:

“Sweets, gum, biscuits, cookies, sandwiches and riceballs are OK; anything with noodles, soup or pickled vegetables like kimchi are all out!” commented one fairly lenient commuter going by the name of koko-heart. “So long as it doesn’t smell too strongly, chewing gum or sucking on a boiled sweet is OK,” suggested another.

The strength of a food’s smell, it would seem, is a key issue here.

“If someone sits next to me and starts eating, I don’t like it;” explained another commenter, “I worry about them spilling it on me, and if the food they’re eating smells particularly strongly, I worry that my clothes will pick up the odour, so I usually try to change seats.”

Middle-aged commuter Marsdt, meanwhile, suggests that “Eating anything during the rush or on a busy mainline is a big no-no. If it’s a shinkansen (bullet train) or an uncrowded local train then I suppose I could permit most foods- so long as they don’t smell.”

Taking their first ride on a bullet train is an experience that many foreigners in Japan look forward to.

As well as being uber fast, the high-speed trains are meticulously clean, almost always arrive precisely on schedule and far more luxurious than regular trains.

Many bullet trains even have a trolley or food-cart service not unlike those on long-haul flights, offering travellers a choice of drinks and snacks as well as alcoholic beverages and souvenirs. As well as this, many larger bullet train stations sell special ekiben packed lunches distinct to that geographical area that customers are able to enjoy during their train ride using the built-in tray tables, making it perfectly acceptable to consume food on-board a bullet train. Even so, it is considered polite to utter a quick “shitsureishimasu” to the person sitting next to you before tucking in.

But regular trains are another matter altogether.

“Trains are public areas;” affirmed a 50-something going by the screen name of Mimicry-buddha, “if we take the train itself out of the equation, it’s basically just another a public area, and as such we shouldn’t eat.”

So, eating anywhere in public is out, too!?

In Japan, aside from outdoor festivals and munching on things like Harajuku’s famous crêpes on the street, eating outdoors, especially while moving around, is considered by many to be quite vulgar. Those with no choice but to eat while outdoors in a public area, but wishing to avoid glares or the scorn of passing old ladies, often squat down somewhere to consume their food, almost as if saying “I’m sitting, so it’s OK!”

“Unless it’s a matter of life or death, people should not eat or drink anything on trains,” the same commenter continues. “Even the sight of people chewing gum is unsightly.”

But what of drinks? Surely everyone gets a little parched during their daily journey? Should we avoid sipping from our water bottles, too?

On that topic, commenter vsvs100 has some simple advice that we might want to consider: “If you’re drinking from a plastic bottle or your own drinks container, then I think it’s ok, but cans should be avoided; they spill easily and are more likely to make a mess.”

But why, aside from the fact that some foods are simply a bit stinky when you’re not the one eating them, are the Japanese quite so against the practice of eating and drinking on public transport?

Many Internet users commented that eating and drinking on trains is “shameful” and shows a lack of self-restraint and consideration for others. While these may seem like some fairly harsh words, we should bear in mind that Japanese society is traditionally group-focused and places emphasis on cooperation and not making waves.

Whether this way of thinking is a result of past governing and leadership styles, or whether it’s simply influenced by the fact that many Japanese live in close proximity to others 24 hours a day, who could say. But words like “meiwaku” (to bother or annoy) and “jama” (disturb) feature prominently in Japanese vocabulary, and people are expected to be constantly aware of the effect their own behaviour may have on those around them, which is perhaps why the mere act of eating a riceball during your morning commute is likely to draw so many stares and is best avoided…

Source: ねたりか

© RocketNews24

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57 Comments
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Its a tough one ... I don't like it either, especially when It comes to stuff like macdonalds, which stink the whole train out.

However If I see a pregnant woman on a train eating a rice ball Im hardly going to be giving dirty looks - Im sure most would agree.

The same goes with a child - if a kid is crying coz its hungry, and the mom gives a senbei, which is worse - the screaming child or the eating child?

Personally I have far more objection to salarymen blazing drunk, or drinking alcohol, burping, farting and picking their noses on trains than someone eating a small snack or having a drink. Just my opinion.

7 ( +8 / -1 )

not removing a backpack during the rush hours

oops.

8 ( +8 / -0 )

It's a hard one. Personally, I'm not against eating and drinking on trains but you have to use common sense I think.

If the train is empty or at least relatively empty, no problem, do what you want. But if it is standing room only, then you shouldn't eat or drink. If the train rocks, it's very easy to lose your balance, then that'll cause trouble obviously.

It's very common for me to see a lot of people drinking Starbucks on crowded Inokashira line trains starting at Shibuya station. I don't know what is wrong with these people. They just seem oblivious to the people standing around them.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

I would never eat on a train, unless its the Shinkansen Drink water when its hot, yes, a must!.

0 ( +5 / -5 )

also depends on which food, a small snack like a riceball or a cookie, thats ok I guess, but gorging down a bigmac or open a bag of potato chips is a different thing and as kumizukashiii says, smelly food sucks.

5 ( +5 / -0 )

Another Rocket News 24 article. Great site.

Removing a back pack and holding it in your arms is stupid. Holding it in your arms does not reduce the space it takes up. And no way with my iPad and camera in it would I put it up on the rack, especially in a crowded train. You get pushed away from it and then can never get to it when it is your stop to get off.

-2 ( +7 / -9 )

Also, I hate crinkly hard plastic bags being rustled by old ladies. Drives me crazy.

2 ( +4 / -2 )

Time, Place, Occasion. Common sense applies, nothing with a strong odor and depends on the type of train, how long the trip is and how crowded it is. Basically, unless you are below 5 yrs old or diabetic, you should be able to wait for that commuter train trip to be over. Discreetly popping something in your piehole is fine but once I was on a crowded Marunouchi subway and some Chinese tourists decided to have a 3 course meal of rather odiferous food - meiwaku deshita.

6 ( +7 / -1 )

Trains are a small enclosed space with little ventilation. No stinky food please. And please chew with your mouth closed. Shinkansen is a bit different but please don't hook in to a stinky fish bento. It reeks up the whole train car.

4 ( +5 / -1 )

Cut the ageist language: "rustled by old ladies."

-7 ( +4 / -11 )

Bottled drinks? Come on. Of course they're okay, as long as it's not alcohol. I've been guilty occasionally of bringing a Starbucks on a not-busy train (something with a lid) but I've seen Japanese people do it, too.

I get that eating is bad class, but again, I've done little snacks. I'm all for keeping the place clean and so on, but I think a small snack is not a problem. Just don't eat a meal.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

I think if someone is sitting down, the food has little to no smell, no chance of making a mess (spilling or crumbs) and the person makes an effort to make it quick, I don't mind. I sometimes take the train from the countryside to Kyoto or Osaka and it is a good 1.5 hour+ trip depending on the train and delays. I always try my best not to eat around others and if I have to, I try to ask them if it is ok first. One lady was very sweet and I even shared my chocolates with her.

However, I am completely against drinking alchoholic drinks on the train...they tend to smell strongly and are easily spilled.

4 ( +5 / -1 )

Well if schools were teaching kids about common sense rather than how to observe rules without thought we wouldn't have any of these problems on trains. Of course there is always going to be someone who has no common sense but it doesnt mean to have to punish the whole country with unreasonable laws that rob everyones freedom. Dont even know what you are allowed to do or not do anymore, very annoying. I think there should be a definite ban on dirty looks and grunting by some unhappy riders though who think they are now law enforcers the moment they step on the train. Well your dirty looks and grunting deserves a punch. Crushing people onto the trains is next to sexual harassment and THAT should be the issue.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

JapanGal- you should always remove your backpack. At the very least you know you won't be slapping people around behind you.

7 ( +7 / -0 )

I think a good rule of thumb is that if they sell it on the train platform then it's OK (unless of course it's crowded).

2 ( +2 / -0 )

It's amazing that a culture that focuses so much on working outside the house also chastises you for eating in public. In effect, you can't go home to eat naturally, and you can't eat outside. It's self-flagellation. It's like the work culture where you can't miss work and the hospitals only accept patients until noon and not on weekends. It makes no sense.

If I'm in a hurry, I'll eat while I'm walking. I don't care about judgement; I was under no illusions about being a big white guy and fitting in here. I don't eat food on the train whose smell would offend anybody, but I'll sure stand outside and quaff down a sandwich while waiting for the train. And I'll drink anything that comes out of a vending machine on the train with not one shred of guilt.

The fact is that Japan questions its cultural mores far less than most other developed countries so people inherit a bunch of silly rules. Most cultural rules that aren't logical, I refuse to follow. You can be uptight; it's not my game though.

7 ( +8 / -2 )

So let me get this straight - "...eating and drinking on trains is "shameful" and shows a lack of self-restraint and consideration for others.", whereas lighting up beside me and my small children in a crowded restaurant without first asking me if I mind, or pushing onto the bus first when you know I was waiting before you is fine?

A LOT of inconsistency in Japanese "manners".

Cooch raises some excellent points.

12 ( +15 / -3 )

Confession - I have eaten M&M's on the train before...

Eating any food with a strong smell should be avoided. How about the people who hop onto the train with a bag of McD's without the intention of eating until they get home. The smell of burgers and fries will permeate the car.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Japanese is the cleanest and most polite people in the world except on the trains (Shinkasen excluded)! Not what-if situations. Things I've seen with my own eyes.

salari-men turning the train into a snack-bar with peanuts or senbe and usually haposhu or sochu cans, often leaving the empty can under the train seat. Worst drinking case ever, salariman with 100-yen glass bottle of Sake drinking it standing and leaving it on the floor to eat senbe. He was using 1 hand to hold the rail and the other hand to eat and drink. Keihin Tohoku line, 3 days ago. Teenagers sitting on the train (Yamanote) and drinking juice. Once they were done left the empty cases and cans behind. Some were not completely empty and started to roll down the aisle making a mess everywhere. Students of various ages eating something and tucking the empty wrapping in the train seat. Very common. Worst case ever, a lady (50s) sitting on the train taking out her home-made bento and eating rice and whatever with her chopsticks in front of everybody. Crowded Keihin Tohoku, 6pm. Last week.

Drinking a beverage because you're thirsty is natural. Turning the train, especially those with many people that don't run too far, into a bar is not. Alcohool on the trains should be banned together with the drunks as a first step and I don't care about "traditional" behaviour.

0 ( +4 / -5 )

Reading this article I wonder if I'm living in the same country. During the inter-city journey that I make every day I would say between one third to a half of people eat or drink something. It would obviously be impractical if very crowded but that's rarely the case. Its not lack of restraint but a lack of time that means that I usually have my breakfast on the train in the morning. On the way back there's a starbucks right outside the kaisatsu and a combini from which many people buy a beer or chu-hi to relax after work. If the other half of the train is sitting there cursing my shameful behaviour all I can say is bite me, I'm not alone.

3 ( +5 / -2 )

Some people need to get a life. I agree that stuff like eating Kimchi is definitely a no no for trains, that would wreak the whole train out. But chewing gum, or having some candy? Come on now, this is not the slave train. People need to loosen up.

Courtesy is giving old people or the pregnant lady your seat when the trains packed, not talking on your mobile, listening to music loudly, not blocking the doorways, giving people space, etc I definitely agree this is all common courtesy all should have.

kimuzukashiiiiiNOV. 07, 2012 - 07:51AM JST Personally I have far more objection to salarymen blazing drunk, or drinking alcohol, burping, farting and picking their noses on trains than someone eating a small snack or having a drink. Just my opinion.

For me this would be time for some amusement. I wouldn't object. Poor guy probably hates his job and is stuck in it for the rest of his life. So I'd let him be, and it wouldn't bother me as long as he's not harming anyone of course.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

It's not just the shinkansen and expresses, the standard Green Car sells snacks too, at least on my local line. The general "rule" seems to be that anything goes in coach-style (forward facing) seats, at least you aren't in anyone's face that way. I eat and drink on any train though, no-one's ever seemed bothered by it (but of course I am careful to not make a mess).

2 ( +2 / -0 )

choochNOV. 07, 2012 - 11:01AM JST It's amazing that a culture that focuses so much on working outside the house also chastises you for eating in public. In effect, you can't go home to eat naturally, and you can't eat outside. It's self-flagellation. It's like the work culture where you can't miss work and the hospitals only accept patients until noon and not on weekends. It makes no sense. If I'm in a hurry, I'll eat while I'm walking. I don't care about judgement; I was under no illusions about being a big white guy and fitting in here. I don't eat food on the train whose smell would offend anybody, but I'll sure stand outside and quaff down a sandwich while waiting for the train. And I'll drink anything that comes out of a vending machine on the train with not one shred of guilt. The fact is that Japan questions its cultural mores far less than most other developed countries so people inherit a bunch of silly rules. Most cultural rules that aren't logical, I refuse to follow. You can be uptight; it's not my game though.

Well you really said it best. I totally agree with you.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

First time I visited Japan I wanted to act natural and be like a Japanese so I bought raw fish and ate it on the train. People did not like this and yell stuff I did not understand. Next thing, express train stop suddenly at tiny tiny station, no lights, no taxi, just one goat....and throw me off..... I stood for hours alone. Just me and fish. Maybe I should not have bought whole fish. Next, goat stole fish.

5 ( +7 / -2 )

If consideration to other people is so important how come Japanese people never seem to hold doors open for anyone? I've had numerous shop doors closed in my face over the years I've lived here.

6 ( +7 / -1 )

drinking beverages on the train is fine, why else would they sell it on the train platform. And eating on the shinkansen is perfectly normal. But eating stinky dried fish or pungent smelling pickles is a little over the top.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Someone eating sweets or small snacks doesn't bother me. Someone eating a burger and chips on the other hand...completely hate it.

Funny though - the people tutting in most cases are likely to be the same oldsters who will stand on the platform right in the way of the opening door and shove you out of the way in their haste to grab a seat at all costs. Then they bizarrely try to claim the high ground about others' behaviour.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Why not just ban all food/drinks in stations and trains...wait, the kiosks will have to stop selling these. The solution is to be conscious of what you're doing & be considerate. No rules can cover all situations, so everyone set their own rules....and we are back where we are!

1 ( +1 / -0 )

This is one slippery-slope argument that I find compelling. Allow candy bars and cookies, and it's not long before you'll get picnics.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Lots of good comments about this story. Eating in public on trains or walking in the streets is an old time japanese no no. This isn't old japan anymore so this society should flow with the times. japan should instead be working out how to get young j-males to close their legs so at least one more person can sit down. Or to teach drunks to sleep sitting up instead of using one-fourth of the length of train seats as his personal travel couch. Or having the kind manners to hold the door open at any store for the person .00457 seconds walking behind them.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Even on Shinkansen and longer distance trains food tables, I was once told that people normally wait a few stations and don't start eating from Tokyo. (That's probably older thinking though). I remember someone telling me that about the Tokaido lIne, but I can't remember the station from which many people thought it was acceptable to start eating at.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Culture's funny. Ironic that a guy can be reading an explicit manga, or looking at a nude in a magazine, with music blaring through his earphones so loud you can hear it meters away, two women can be talking and laughing loudly with glee, but you feel guilty whispering into a cell phone, or swigging on a weider jelly so you don't pass out.

Surely instead of rules we could just think about whether what we are doing is bothering anyone.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Instead of introducing more rules, just two considerations: common sense and tolerance.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Surely instead of rules we could just think about whether what we are doing is bothering anyone.

If you do that, then just admit in advance that ANYTHING you do - even something as simple as getting on the train - will bother SOMEBODY. You could resolve to just stand in the corner and not move, and somebody would claim you're acting "suspicious".

4 ( +5 / -1 )

My wife explained this to me, and I follow the rules. I think most people that come here are aware that there is no eating on trains and cell phone usage is kept to a minimum. From the constant annoucements (in japanese) to the english speaking commuter that goes.."Psst, hey you can't do that. It's considered rude"... we ALL know or will know shortly after our arrival to Japan.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Oh for the love of Christ. Eating a bit of food and having a quick drink on the train is evil! Ridiculous.

I was recently in Morocco where a gentleman on a hot train proceeded to wipe the sweat of his brow with his hand and then flick it onto the floor and over the feet of several bystanders. That's what I'd call disgusting, yet even in that case none of the locals blinked an eye or cared.

So excuse me if I think it's ridiculous that people get so uppity about a bit of food. Especially when I've seen dozens of young Japanese women smearing make-up all over their faces on commutes (usually turning them from somewhat attractive to absolutely disgusting plastic looking - no wonder they can't get men, etc etc) and taking up about 3 seats in the process with their bags, which seems to be perfectly acceptable. Get your freaking priorities right.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

I think the limit should be a five course meal - anything more is just rude.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

@kringis, I agree. Although it's the rule, It's just a matter of time. Look at the amount of young people, and old, that are doing it now. They are the next generation. What's gonna happen 10+ years from now? But, we're talking about present times and it's a rude thing to do. I personally think drinking a ChuHi on the last train is ok :)

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Common sense in all 1st world trains - stinky and messy bad, discreet ok. Japan isn't special that way. Worst behaviour I saw ever was Osaka teenagers with chips, coke and shoes on the seat. Crumbs and spray flying everywhere. I still wonder if they were on a dare.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Just live in the countryside and drive your own car.

Simples!

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Open a can of surströmming. Hmmm.

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

All this for just eating and drinking!

What about the rest?..... Kids standing on seats jumping up and down as mum chats to their friends over the phone or the other mum is sitting next to them, blind to the fact that there kids are treating the train like a playground.

What about the old ladies chatting and shouting away as they go on their hiking trip?

What about the boys who spread their legs out at the openning of the door and one by one each person falls over them as they get on and off the train?

What about the all so comman salaryman breath, and the picking of their nose that then gets smired up the window on handrale?

The list can go on............

2 ( +3 / -1 )

So long as it's not against the rules and the people eating are not making a mess on the seats/floor or taking up seats to place their food, then it's no one else's business what or how much they eat. Smells? I'm sorry, but the perfume many obasans or 'vegetarian men' wear is far more overwhelming, and many stations themselves pump out exhaust from sweet potato snack stalls or Manneken stalls, etc., and lest we forget BO, alcohol (never mind the old codgers that DRINK on the train!), tabacco, and the other smells that pervade a train car. How do we ban those?

The better question is what are people going to do about bad behaviour anyway? People are more than quick to complain about it here or with friends/family/co-workers, etc. IRL, but when it comes to addressing the people who are causing the 'inconvenience' to them and others, 99% would rather complain in their heads but do or say nothing, including the staff who walk through the cars trying to peddle pre-paid cards or just moving towards the conductor's box.

Make 'no food or drink' a rule, and ENFORCE it, otherwise move to another area if you can, or accept it if you cannot.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

Consideration in this respect WAS a big part of the culture, but not any more. Japanese people on the whole are pretty courteous and willing to bend over backwards to help you out if you approach them, but I'll bet you that anyone who complains on the train about such and such group's behaviour (old complaining about the young and vice-versa) do things themselves that offend or bother others. I mean, isn't it a Japanese no-no to have your ringer on while riding the train? well, I can tell you for a fact that more middle aged people and seniors keep their ringers on (with those little Chinese bells on their phones as well so they rattle all the time!), as well as business people. An old man who becomes belligerent and bright red after a drinking party will whine about a young woman doing her makeup on the train. People are more and more failing to wait for people to exit the train before they rush on to try and get a seat -- much like they complain is the case in China ("and not Japan!"). I see people spit on the steps and waiting areas for trains ALL THE TIME. Unlike in SK, where young people will get up and give their seat to anyone even slightly older than them, in Japan people both young and old just pretend to sleep on the priority seats, etc.

The idea that all of the culture here follows any sort of 'rules' is an outdated concept. We SHOULD all try and make the environment as comfortable as possible for each other, but that includes a bit of introversion as well.

4 ( +5 / -1 )

How on earth is removing your backpack saving room? Where are you gonna put it? Once holding it gets too heavy your gonna just put it down on the floor anyway. What a stupid rule. Seriously.

-5 ( +0 / -5 )

@ StewartAG agreed or how about cutting in front of you in lines at convenience stores restaurants, etc etc etc. Driving etiquette is awful too. Ever since driving and talking on the phone have become and enforced illegality people will stop IN THE ROAD whenever and where ever they are to chat on the phone. I guess hands free has not caught on here. Also public urination is a huge issue in this country. The train I can't speak to as I never ride public transportation here.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

moomoochoo: "How on earth is removing your backpack saving room? Where are you gonna put it? Once holding it gets too heavy your gonna just put it down on the floor anyway. What a stupid rule. Seriously."

Again, it's not a 'rule', per se, but I for one won't sit hunched over so that my back pack stays on my back and against the seat. I take it off and put it down at my feet, where it does not take up, say, the space it would if you put it on the seat beside you (as many people, especially obachan, do). There's also the rack overhead that you can put it on, but every time I've put something up on said rack I usually end up forgetting it when I exit the train.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

All these "rules" are just a wish of keeping something that people think is traditional and Japanese and therefore great. Why can't you eat on a train? Why? Because of the smell? Well, then Oyaji with the worst BO ever or obaachan that has a breath like a wet dog, please exit the train. And why is Shinkansen ok but the Metro not. BS, arbitrary rules, I say. That being said, whipping out the hashi and the bento might not be the easiest thing to do in a train but that's another story.

As long as you don't actually disturb anyone by spilling on them, anything goes in my book.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Just quietly I think that people should adhere to local customs. When in Rome . . .

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Also, I hate crinkly hard plastic bags being rustled by old ladies. Drives me crazy.

Put your overly loud headphones on!

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Just quietly I think that people should adhere to local customs. When in Rome . .

FYI, Rome could never have imagined Japan's trains at rush hour.

Part of the problem as well is that different areas and different lines have different "customs", or manners. When in Rome doesn't work here because you just might end up copying something that other people find to be offensive. Best thing would be to do is pay close attention to those around you for a few days then decide what you are going to do.

Or copy some HS girls and do whatever the heck you like.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

How on earth is removing your backpack saving room? Where are you gonna put it? Once holding it gets too heavy your gonna just put it down on the floor anyway. What a stupid rule. Seriously.

What a stupid comment, put it between your legs. Get a decent sized backpack with a sturdy structure and place it between your legs. Get a backpack with a solid handle/grip on the top that you can hold easily. There is a lot more space near or on the floor in the leg region than around the torso region dont like it? then dont get on the train - move out of the city.

High school kids with their annoying vinyl team shoulder bags annoy me greatly on the train and at the station.

as for eating, on packed trains no, on empty trains, a snack is fine. Three nikuman and a natto onigiri like the obese man near me the other day - no keep that off the train.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

"I worry that my clothes will pick up the odour ( of the food ) so I usually try to change seats"

Cripes, on most of the trains I ride, I would have to try to squeeze my way to another standing position.

On thing I hate to smell on trains is that awful surume dried squid stuff invariably consumed with chuhais or beers by middle aged salarymen.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

I can understand food but drinks? how is that shameful or rude? if you're thirsty then you're thirsty. If you aren't allowed to drink on a train then they wouldn't have drink machines right there on the platforms. In Nagoya I see people drinking from bottles all the time and I do it too and they all range from young to old. I wouldn't pull it out and drink on an over crowded train since that is difficult to begin with but if I am sitting I will. I have seen old men drinking beer from cans before on the train too that was rude and annoying but I don't think resealable bottles are hurting anybody.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

I have to move out of the city because I refuse to trip over my bag everytime the train lurches. YEAAAAAH RIGHT!!!

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

moomoochoo - No, you have to move out of the city because you are smacking people around behind you. It's common sense and common courtesy.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

On a hot afternoon nice cold beer right in the Yamanote!!

0 ( +1 / -1 )

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