lifestyle

End-of-life conversations can be hard, but your loved ones will thank you

10 Comments
By Deborah Carr

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Tell your loved ones if you want to donate your organs. Tell them what mind of funeral you want, where you want go die, what kind of care you want. Tell them where important documents are. Get rid of all the unused stuff in your house so they don’t have to deal with it after you die.

7 ( +8 / -1 )

Definitely something you should have contingencies for, regardless of how much longer you think you have left to live.

Doesn't need to be a conversation though, having an up to date will is probably far more important. I hopefully still have many years left in me, but update my will annually just in case. Never know when the revolution comes. Or, you know, a bus.

6 ( +7 / -1 )

When you think about it, it really is quite odd that we plan for almost everything in life except for the one thing that is 100% certain to happen.

8 ( +9 / -1 )

When you think about it, it really is quite odd that we plan for almost everything in life except for the one thing that is 100% certain to happen.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

No thank you, I’m perfectly happy not even thinking about it. Too morbid. My lawyer can handle all the unpleasant things.

-7 ( +1 / -8 )

Speaking as someone who was the Executrix for the Estates of both my parents, I can say that the last duty I was able to perform for them was made much "easier" due to their careful planning. Both had current Last Will and Testaments, had designated of Power of Attorney, compiled Living Wills (which is what wishes concerning their end of life treatment are called in my province) and provided a file of detailed instructions concerning funeral services. Each also had purchase a pre-paid cremation plan as I also do now. When travelling, I make sure to purchase insurance which includes repatriation of remains and the company holding my plan will look after everything.

Being the person responsible for carrying out the final wishes of the deceased is not an easy task. It is filled with all manner of red tape, rules one isn't aware of, procedures which are unfamiliar and events which can be deeply affecting emotionally. The closer the relationship the more devastating it can be. Therefore, I would urge everyone to make such a plan as a kindness to the ones they love who will be left behind. I would urge everyone to learn the law in their own jurisdiction and prepare properly.

Then again, if you hate your relatives: Stick it to them. I don't know how delicious revenge might be when you're cold, but you might enjoy the taste while here.

6 ( +7 / -1 )

This is an excellent essay.

I do not understand the negative votes.

4 ( +5 / -1 )

I have a book filled with my bank account info/investment information/insurance..etc.

also, my funeral arrangements have been paid for. All information is in one book. It just makes it easier for those you love

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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