Photo: GaijinPot
lifestyle

From Japan with love: A guide to Japanese Christmas cards

3 Comments
By Alexandra Ziminski

This time of year, Japan has a tradition of sending nengajo, or New Year’s greetings, that dates back to the Heian era (794-1185). Thus, opening holly-jolly-filled Christmas cards only took off recently. Nowadays, you can find rows and rows of reindeer bouncing and sleigh bells chiming-themed Yuletide cards in the aisles of your local department store.

This Christmas, you may be looking for a card to send back home to your loved ones or just giving Sato from accounting an obligatory holiday message. Either way, these options might help.

Happy holidays with mini-Santa

GPBlog_XmasCard_01Mi.jpg
It wouldn’t be a Japanese Christmas without mini-Santa. Photo: Alexandra Ziminski

Santa is known for his large round belly, gigantic frame and occasional mishap with a chimney. So what if he was shrunk down to a more palatable size and multiplied?

You’ll journey from Hokkaido to Okinawa with this adorable mini-Santa series from Greeting Life, my go-to for family and friends back home. By meshing distinctive elements of Japan with our lovable festive icon, these cards create imaginative scenarios that will delight the receiver.

More ant-sized Kris Kringles can also be found in a special Sanrio showcase.

Mini-Santa highlights:

Distinctively Japanese

When you think of Christmas, your mind doesn’t generally conjure up images of pristine snow-covered pagodas and cranes flying overhead. Though, this doesn’t mean they are any less beautiful on a greetings card.

Click here to read more.

© GaijinPot

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3 Comments
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completely wrong.

Christmas are about something else-not some "christmas cards".

but yes in Japan is just name for another commercial event...just another sale season and more business for someone...

0 ( +2 / -2 )

Christian Christmas Day was just adapted to an already ancient celebration which in Scandinavia still is called by the original name: Jul…meaning wheel or turn of the year.

In Scandinavia you send Julekort not Christmas cards.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Cute! Cute!

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

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