lifestyle

Getting stopped by police in Japan – how often does it happen (and why?)

121 Comments
By Evie Lund, RocketNews24

Japan is not without its random, unpredictable crimes, but in general it’s one of the safest countries in the world. Rates of theft and violent crime are comparatively low, and with 24-hour-staffed “koban” police boxes every few blocks, it’s easy to feel protected here.

However, foreigners in Japan sometimes report being stopped by the police and asked for ID, a practice which can seem shocking and unfair, especially if you’re not sure why it’s happening. With the police in Japan having less violent crime to deal with, they’re often tasked with handling smaller matters like bicycle theft, lost items, and simply giving directions to passers-by. They also sometimes pop by your house on their rounds to leave a friendly note in your mailbox letting you know where your nearest koban is. In short, the police in Japan have quite an approachable image, and are often addressed by members of the public as “Omawari-san“, or, literally, “Mr./Ms. Walk-Around.”

So, why do they stop foreigners? Well, firstly it’s important to note that they also stop Japanese people and ask to see their IDs as well. Being stopped by the police in Japan doesn’t necessarily mean you’ve done anything wrong at all. If you’re an unfamiliar face in their patrol area, they may just want to know what you’re doing there.

When I was working in a small rural town in Kyoto Prefecture, I was stopped in my first week there by a pair of officers who asked to see my ID (this was during the days of the "Gaikokujin toroku"/alien registration system, and not the residence system that’s in place today). I produced my ID, and then we had a really nice chat about the town and where all the best drinking spots were. They even told me about the town festival that was happening that weekend. Nothing to worry about, right?

Of course, the police sometimes stop people for more serious matters, including checking foreigners’ residence cards or passports to make sure they’re not illegally present in the country. Also, if a crime has been reported in the area, they may stop people randomly. If you’re riding a bicycle, they may stop you and ask to see your bike registration (since bike theft is a big issue in Japan, each bicycle must be registered at purchase.) If a police officer asks for your ID, you are legally obligated to show it. It is illegal to walk around in Japan as a foreigner without either your passport or residence card on your person. However, if you’re stopped by a plain-clothes policeman, it’s probably a good idea to ask to see their "keisatsu techo" (police badge) as well.

But how often do people get stopped by the police in Japan? YouTuber That Japanese Man Yuta conducted a survey of his viewers asking exactly that question. The results are quite reassuring. Yuta also describes his own personal experiences of being stopped by the police in the video, which you can watch below.

As Yuta’s initial survey shows, you’re only likely to be stopped by the police once every three years in Japan on average! Of course, it seems that some people get stopped far more often than others, though it’s not exactly clear what the main factor is. Yuta’s survey is ongoing so head over to this link if you’d like to share your personal experience!

Source: YouTube/That Japanese Man Yuta

Read more stories from RocketNews24. -- How to protect your umbrella from rampant umbrella thieves in Japan -- Japanese convenience store clerks ready to fight crime by hurling giant paint balls 【Video】 -- Policewoman’s posterior produces poetic justice as she arrests man she says groped her on train

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121 Comments
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People always whine about being stopped countless times in Japan, it gotta be a Tokyo phenomenon or something. In more than a decade in Japan I got stopped twice (while cycling in the middle of the night), but what can I say? I bet they stop much more other asian looking people.

1 ( +5 / -4 )

Rates of theft and violent crime are comparatively low, and with 24-hour-staffed “koban” police boxes every few blocks, it’s easy to feel protected here

.REPORTED by the media or police agency. The reality is different that what is reported. Plenty of petty crimes occur daily that are not reported. Oh and my local Koban is not staffed 24/7 they often are out on patrol and there is no one there. Just a sign, in Japanese, telling people to pick up the phone and call someone for assistance, if needed.

As Yuta’s initial survey shows, you’re only likely to be stopped by the police once every three years in Japan on average! Of course, it seems that some people get stopped far more often than others, though it’s not exactly clear what the main factor is. Yuta’s survey is ongoing so head over to this link if you’d like to share your personal experience!

He never talked to me.......I may have citizenship now, but in over 30 years of living here I have never been randomly stopped by the police ANYWHERE in Japan, outside of the the drunk-driving check points and getting nailed for speeding once way back........:)

4 ( +10 / -6 )

Of course, the police sometimes stop people for more serious matters, including checking foreigners’ residence cards or passports to make sure they’re not illegally present in the country.

And if they are found to be illegal, they are deported. Amazing how that concept works huh. Kudos Japan. You're a nation of laws.

-11 ( +10 / -21 )

Three times in twenty-five years. Once random. Twice as part of bicycle theft checks in which Japanese were also being stopped.

Although I have not heard similar stories in recent years, I've had Japanese students (males) complain that they sometimes got stopped three times in a single day.

Plenty of petty crimes occur daily that are not reported.

Not reporting petty theft is, I think standard. I didn't report it when I lived in California. I only reported it once in the UK because the insurance company said I had to if I wanted to get paid. The one time it happened in Japan (a shoulder bag lifted out of the rear carrier of my bicycle), the thief got something I had planned to discard. Further, the bag was empty.

-1 ( +6 / -7 )

Been here 40 plus years, never been stopped by police, only time anyone ever asked for ID is going into Narita Airport when there were long lines of everyone producing ID.

4 ( +8 / -4 )

Though so many overseas people live in Japan, especially Tokyo area, Japan has yet to get used to stay with Foreigners. Therefore they stand out from the view of us Japanese. After this it will be improved soon, I think.

4 ( +8 / -4 )

Well it doesn't help if you fit a stereotype. I know it's hard to explain to anyone that's not experienced it but standing out does not help at all. Anything that sticks out here is most definitely nailed down.

4 ( +8 / -4 )

Did you know you are not supposed to give your resident's card to police? You can show them you have one, but you should not give it to them. The only people who you can give it to are immigration officers. I've been stopped a few times and never give them my card. I show it to them and give them my licence. I had one real twat cop that got very angry I wouldn't give him my card, but his partner knew I didn't have to give it to him and shut him up. If they take your card away to their car or into the koban they make you illegal because you don't have your card. I know it sounds totally daft, but it is true! Show it to them and let them take any information they need, but don't give it to them.

16 ( +19 / -3 )

14 years never been stopped.

3 ( +7 / -4 )

"So, why do they stop foreigners? Well, firstly it’s important to note that they also stop Japanese people and ask to see their IDs as well. " who wrote this false crap? its illegal in jPn for police to ask for your id unless you are under suspicion of a crime. in fact, japanese dont have an id except passport and driving license, both of which are not required to carry on you in Japan. more so, in recent years, Japanese people often post youtube videos of interaction with police, and they specifically refuse to produce id unless charged with a crime.

Foreigners, in fact have to carry alien card at all times. and police may ask to see one under pretence of verifying that you didnt break that law.

11 ( +15 / -4 )

Well, firstly it’s important to note that they also stop Japanese people and ask to see their IDs as well.

This is quite misleading. There is no requirement for Japanese nationals to carry any ID. However foreigners are subject to arrest if they do not carry their jumin card or a passport at all times.

22 ( +23 / -1 )

If they take your card away to their car or into the koban they make you illegal because you don't have your card.

But if you've done no wrong and after they've verified your identity & legal status, they MUST give it back right??

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

18 years here and have never been stopped, but have been to the cop shop three times to report my bicycle had been stolen.

0 ( +3 / -3 )

I was stopped but I just claimed 外交特権 and was left alone. You should all try it.

-4 ( +8 / -12 )

here is a bit about refusing to show id unless done wrong.. this is more related to driver license but it similar , can find u relevant law number later http://www.nanzanlaw.com/column/718

4 ( +5 / -1 )

I've been stopped many times by the police during my twelve years in Japan. I am always polite,answer their questions, then get on with my day. You see, I don't have a chip on my shoulder about being stopped. They are just doing their job, and in my experience, they are polite and professional.

0 ( +10 / -10 )

This is just another in a long line of, stop and compare, crap that happens with Japanese quite often. They love to obfuscate the issues, "hey Japanese get stopped too", and make your concerns as a foreigner seem trivial.

8 ( +13 / -5 )

6 years, I was stopped twice. First was when I tied a futon set on my bicycle that I bought from Nitori. I thought was OK because it was only few blocks from my apartment, but I saw a patrol car made a U-turn and I knew I was in trouble. After checking my registration and some reminders, the police officers let me off and even offered to bring me to my apartment which I of course declined.

To be fair, maybe just so I wouldn`t think I was being singled out, they stopped another old Japanese rider going our way and ask for his bicycle registration. He was so mad and started yelling at the two police officers. I felt guilty to both the ojiisan and the police officers, maybe I should've taken their offer to take me to my apartment by patrol car?

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

The video ignores the obvious point that there is a huge difference in experience of foreigners being stopped by police in Japan depending on whether the foreigners look western or not. South Asian, African, Middle Eastern etclooking people get stopped all the time. European, North American looking people, almost never.

The exception to this is at Narita and possibly other airports, where in recent years foreign-looking people do have their passports checked for no discernible reason. The only impact of this is to create an unwelcoming impression of Japan within minutes of arrival. Ho-hum.

8 ( +9 / -1 )

25 years and never been stopped, except when driving. And then, it was only one stop that seemed unjustified. He was a young cop, and couldn't seem to tell me what I had done wrong. I said so, and the cop's senior partner quickly apologized for him. Took all of 30 seconds.

I have heard stories of people being stopped for no apparent reason other then being a foreigner. But whether it's luck, location or something else, I haven't seen it first hand.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Being of color,the police can't wait to stop you or me anyway.Got stopped twice in the space of three months this year.They ask for my gaijin card but I don't carry it with me out of principle.It's not the veterans doing the stopping,it's the rookies trying to be a hero or getting brownie points.One officer was about 152cms,stopping me 12.30am.As she took my details,"I'm like... Really?"

-3 ( +9 / -12 )

I have been stopped twice. Once in Shinjuku and was asked if I had anything that could cut, such as knife or a pair of scissors.

The other time was in Shin Urayasu, Chiba when I was stopped and asked such important questions as who do I work for and their contact information, which country was my favorite, what was my favorite food, etc. The police officer asked in English and I answered in Japanese

I have also witnessed many, many streeet searches of Japanessee meen by the police. Caught a dozen or so my camera. Haven't seen this n a while though.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

I often see police stopping (what appear to be) Japanese men in Kabukicho and Shibuya quite often. They are almost always guys carrying some kind of bag, and the police are asking to see inside it. Often the person stopped is being quite rude and uncooperative.

I've only once seen them stopping a foreigner who appeared to be a gentleman of African background, but he seemed to be having a good-humored talk with them. I've never been stopped in 20-years living here.

In any case, regardless of what country you are in, if a police officer stops you, I recommend you be polite and cooperate. It's not worth the risk of what they could do to you otherwise.

0 ( +3 / -3 )

They ask for my gaijin card but I don't carry it with me out of principle.

As a foreigner, you are required to carry it at all times. Not sure what 'principle' you are observing. But, your point:

Being of color,the police can't wait to stop you or me anyway.

I fully sympathise with.

11 ( +12 / -1 )

Haven't been stopped once in 5 years, though my friends say they've been stopped heaps of times. Being stopped is probably more common towards the outer rims of Tokyo and not the more affluent areas

2 ( +3 / -1 )

Twice in 18 years. Once because I had just come back from a trip and had 3 bags, a police car wheeled around and asked me to produce my gaijin card. They asked me a tonne of questions about the bags and searched one of them. The other time was when I went to the conbini to pay my bills. There was a police officer on the phone when I went in, when I came back out I was stopped me and asked to produce my gaijin card. I'm a woman so its not only men who get stopped.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

Similar to bullfighter - 3 times in more than 25 years. Twice for bike registration, and once in an airport, using a mobile phone, in the days when mobile phones were rare, and the size of a house brick; he was just curious! Always very polite, showed their ID to me, though their habit of writing using pencils in their notebooks is disconcerting, room for erasure/ correction afterwards.

4 ( +6 / -2 )

The JP work very much on "naganen no kan" or what would be known as a "hunch". The "If in doubt, check it out" is very alive and well in Japan. And if you are stopped, politely answer questions, produce whatever documents they request and in the end say "Gokurou-sama desu". Most likely they'll remember you and never question you again.

-2 ( +3 / -5 )

I've been stopped a few times in 2009 & 2010. I think they were - sorry for the lack of words - "cleaning up" then, these days, they don't even bat an eye on me.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

NEVER STOPPED! However, the first visit of a guest from California was handled by the host family very well. The guest was introduced to the neighbors. Everything went well until one day the guest was walking south on a wide boulevard - two lanes in both directions, separated by by trees. A woman approached. She crossed the street and walked past two streets. She crossed the boulevard, walked past one street light, the cross back to the original side. What is the meaning? The foreigners in Japan and every other country in the world need to learn one lesson when they travel outside of the USA. THE US CONSTITUTION DOES NOT TRAVEL WITH YOU. If you know your rights in Japan or another country, fine. Otherwise, remain calm and be prepared to show your papers. (It may be a good idea to keep the local consulate or embassy's address and phone number in the mobile phone.

-12 ( +1 / -13 )

that they also stop Japanese people and ask to see their IDs as well.

Really? Mrs Des has been stopped and ID checked once in her 36 years - and I believe this was more of a bicycle rego check. I guess on average I get stopped and carded once every 2 years, which can be a bummer when you are out running/exercising and not carrying it. Around the same for my fellow white foreign male friends - people of colour Ive worked with have been "randomly" checked quite a lot more - one on his very first day of work!

6 ( +6 / -0 )

day the guest was walking south on a wide boulevard - two lanes in both directions, separated by by trees. A woman approached. She crossed the street and walked past two streets. She crossed the boulevard, walked past one street light, the cross back to the original side. What is the meaning?

What is the meaning indeed?

9 ( +10 / -1 )

Over 11 years, I have been stopped twice, but within 10 minutes. It was during the old days when Narita was a fortress. Once immediately after the ID check out the train, and a second one in the Departures Lobby. I raised my concerns to the 2nd officer, who politely excused himself and we both went on with our day.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

I have only been stopped for speeding in my car (twice).

2 ( +3 / -1 )

The police can randomly stop a Japanese national and ask for I.D. And the Japanese can and should give the policeman/women the finger and tell him/her to stop wasting tax payers money and work.

I'm an average Caucasian who has a normal 9:00-5:30 full-time job. I mean no tattoos and a normal haircut and etc but I get stopped all the time in Sapporo. Sometimes under the guise of checking bicycle registration and sometimes even more randomly.

They almost always check my foreigner card after checking the bicycle registration and once even stopped me, saying they wanted to check bicycle registration but then went onto check my foreigner card, call it in and finally after 20min, send me on my way saying I should be careful because I 'almost' went through a red light without checking the bicycle registration!

It's patently ridiculous. And each time they take about 20min to record all the info on the foreigner card. Sapporo police are generally the epitome of laziness, incompetence, ignorance and stupidity.

14 ( +14 / -0 )

I've lived here for 9 years, and I've been stopped at least a half dozen times, although not in the last year or so. The first time was while riding a bike late at night, and once near Tachikawa station because I was carrying my fishing gear over my shoulder (like a rifle), plus I had a camo rain coat on. The rest were in my neighborhood and in/near Hachioji Station, for being gaijin in public. Most of the police were very polite, and I soon realized the quickest way to get through these was to be nice and cooperate. My most unpleasant experience was in Hachioji Station. I was waiting for my wife to return from work. Two undercover police flashed their badges, checked all of my IDs to make sure the information all matched, and then they told me to empty my pockets. So I did so, producing my glasses and cell phone. One of them patted my pockets and said "Your pockets are not empty, what's this?" Then he reached into my pocket before I could, and yanked out my handkerchief. I'm sure he thought it was a bag of weed. Then I laughed and they left me alone.

4 ( +5 / -1 )

I was stopped but I just claimed 外交特権 and was left alone.

Ballsy. I like it.

5 ( +6 / -1 )

I think people are too sensitive about this. However I've never owned a bike in my 24 years in Japan because you're leaving yourself open to the braindead plod stopping you.

The only suspicions they could pull me up one would be 'having blue eyes in a built up area' or 'being in possession of white skin while walking'.

Yes japan is an institutionally racist society, no matter what the deniers state, but it isn't an aggressively institutionally racist society like the USA, where you could get shot quite easily for sticking out, and if you behave politely to Japanese policemen, contact with them is generally very benign. Yes you do get the occasional dickwad, but where don't you?

1 ( +7 / -6 )

The video ignores the obvious point that there is a huge difference in experience of foreigners being stopped by police in Japan depending on whether the foreigners look western or not. South Asian, African, Middle Eastern etclooking people get stopped all the time. European, North American looking people, almost never.

You my friend just won this argument! The vast majority of the people claiming to have never been stopped despite being in Japan for decades don't recognize their white privilege at work.

Go to any major transportation hub in the major cities throughout Japan. You asked the same number of whites and the same number of people of color, and the results will be surprisingly different.

8 ( +8 / -0 )

Cloe: are you referring to when you get off the Narita express and have to produce your passport or ID ? I notice that they stop asking for ID or your passport the last time (April) I went through. I been here six year and never been pull up by police. I have been stop many times walking back in a crowd from Sapporo Dome to the subway for crowd / traffic control but I can,t tell Security from the Keisatsu.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Silvafan:

I'm sure I have benefited from that privilege but at least I am aware of it. Sadly the video man seemed not to be.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

“Gaikokujin toroku”/alien registration system, and not the residence system that’s in place today)

I was told to lock my residence card with My Number in a fire box. Am I correct?

-2 ( +2 / -4 )

More than 17 years in Japan, cycled thousands of km., but never stopped once. I'm white, but the places I lived and cycled had relatively few few foreigners of any colour.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Have only ever been ID checked for traffic violations, and have seen several instances of stop-and-search of several Japanese males (with bags).

As with everything in life, other readers' mileage may vary.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

I was told to lock my residence card with My Number in a fire box. Am I correct?

Good luck with that when stopped by police and asked to show your residence card.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

MsDelicious,

"I was told to lock my residence card with My Number in a fire box. Am I correct?"

Law requires you to have the residence card with you at all times.

Going on four decades, including 25 years riding a bicycle, and a lot of time in airports. Never been stopped once.

And there are certainly not kobans every few blocks in this city.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

In my many years here I've only been stopped once for a bicycle registration check - and the only reason I didn't make the officer who stopped me miserable for it was he was also stopping Japanese people.

I don't know why I don't get stopped more. It certainly does suggest something alarming that I get so little attention but people I know who are African or who look military get stopped all the time. Makes me think the Japanese police aren't doing their jobs properly.

1 ( +4 / -3 )

But if you've done no wrong and after they've verified your identity & legal status, they MUST give it back right??

They are not allowed to take it off you in the first place. It is your personal property and the only thing keeping you out of jail. Would you entrust it to some sleepy cop that failed high school? Damn sure I wouldn't!

There is another related issue when applying for jobs. Many companies request copies of your resident's card and passport with job applications. This is a huge identity theft risk and illegal. If the company wants to make copies of your personal data during an interview you are supposed to witness it and sign across the copy as well as signing a personal information disclosure agreement, which you should receive a copy of. Sending copies of your resident's card and passport with a resume to 'Bob Smith' (AKA: Nigerian mafia) is just stoopid!

3 ( +3 / -0 )

are you referring to when you get off the Narita express and have to produce your passport or ID ?

There was a time when everyone going into Narita had to produce ID. If you were in a car, the security people would look in the boot. Interestingly, they would often ask only the driver (Japanese) for ID, check the faces of everyone else in the car, and wave us through. They stopped doing all that a while ago, now I think it's just a quick Hello and on your way.

The last time I was asked to show ID going into Narita Airport by train was a couple of years ago when there was some big meeting coming up - G7, or G20, or some such and the place was crawling with police and security.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Yeah, my experiences reflect the fact I am white and blue eyed. Never been stopped before and in my 23rd year. I also noticed my appearence really helped at immigration many years ago too. I applied for permanent residency. The guy behind the counter practically rolled out a red carpet for me. It's not fair other nationalities of people get stopped just because the way they look. I have heard and read some bad stories about this issue.

5 ( +6 / -1 )

MaDelicious,

Below are from the government's home page FAQ. You might want to get your resident card out of the fire box and start carrying it.

Should I always carry my residence card with me? What will be the problem (penalty) if I don’t carry it? A. It is necessary to carry residence card all the time, and to show it if presentation is required by immigration examiners, immigration officers, or police officers etc. If you don’t carry residence card, you may be punished with a fine not exceeding 200,000 yen, and if you refuse to present it, you may be punished with imprisonment for not more than one year or a fine not exceeding 200,000 yen."

Q42: Is it possible not to carry my residence card if I carry my passport? A. It is necessary to carry residence card all the time, whether you carry your passport or not.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

I get stopped , on average , about twice a year , I'm a nondescript caucasian. There is usually a trigger for it, seems that any excuse to stop a non-Japanese is good enough, for example riding my bicycle a little quicker than most "why are you riding so fast?" , crossing on a red signal - cop blows whistle and alerts everyone about the criminal whitey , meanwhile Japanese do the same without reprimand . It's embarrassing, annoying and a waste of time, I was late for work twice due to random stops.

8 ( +8 / -0 )

Heat getting to me... Hit "submit" before mentioning that there are some exceptions to being required to carry your residence card: if you are under 16, if you are a --special-- permanent resident (usually those of Korean or Chinese descent whose families have been here for grnerations).

2 ( +3 / -1 )

I'll post after a very long time and disappear again. I'm "white" European (nothing to do with the Caucasus mountains) and have been stopped only once falling in the new-face-in-the-area category. The author obviously doesn't know what "profiling" is. They should go to Nippori where there is a constant hunt targeting Asians, especially Chinese and Koreans. I was never, ever, stopped there when Asians around me were constantly stopped and checked. Same thing happens to most people from Pakistan, Bangladesh, Iran, India etc. They are persistently checked wherever they are to the point of harassment. Also male Japanese bicycle riders in their 20s are constantly harassed by the police having their bicycles checked while elderly, salary-men or mothers with 3 children on the bike are never stopped.

8 ( +9 / -1 )

They ask for my gaijin card but I don't carry it with me out of principle.

Don't complain about the police if they haul you in for not carrying it, that's on you. You want to live here, then it's up to you to follow the laws, you run the risk of being detained and you know it. Yet you also state that you have been stopped twice in three months....sounds to me like you are looking for trouble.

3 ( +8 / -5 )

When I lived in Japan between 2000 and 2008 I was stopped twice.

One in Shinjuku. The policeman was a class act. I was just enjoying my weekend and walking around shopping and the policeman politely asked for my alien registration card. I showed it to him and he told me why he was checking. I told him I understand his job and thanked him for his service. He then astonished me by saluting me which I found admirable and commendable and wish there was more policemen like that. It would make for a better place in the world.

The second time was when I was at a train station and trying to catch my train back to my apartment outside of Tokyo. It was getting late and I did not want to miss the train. I was carrying some bags back from Kyoto where I was on vacation for a couple of days, and all of the sudden I was surrounded by cops that were not that nice. They roughly told me to come to the station and started searching my bags without explanation or niceties and I knew they were intending to keep me there or the police station. I then had enough and produced my US passport and alien registration card on the counter of the station and said in Japanese loudly, but calmly, you have an issue with me just trying to head back home after a vacation, then you must then allow me to call my embassy and per the U.S.-Japanese legal agreement I am allowed an attorney and US embassy representative now if you wish to detain me further for no charges. Let's just say, they were quite intimidated and hopped too and let me go really fast and even put my possessions back in my bags. I guess they did not want me to create an international incident where they would get highly embarrassed.

Moral of the story. Know your rights yet respect their laws and regulations.

5 ( +7 / -2 )

If your Japanese is fluent enough and you don't feel like obliging, you can probably talk your way out of it by asking if the officer is asking on the basis of probable cause. Last time I tried that, he said Ii desu (never mind) and waved me along.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

Author of this article should have read first debito.org. My friend was checked 4 times in a month!

http://www.debito.org/shokumushitsumon.html http://www.japantimes.co.jp/community/2014/04/02/issues/rights-can-protect-against-fake-cops/#.V5rnahKkzcs

A Japanese/Philippino mix blooded was arrested for not showing ID because they didn't believe he has Japanese nationatly and it was completely illegal.

6 ( +7 / -1 )

They love to obfuscate the issues, "hey Japanese get stopped too", and make your concerns as a foreigner seem trivial.

i thought you were japanese so why the "they"? btw, "obfuscate" means "to obscure or make something more difficult to understand." you're using the word incorrectly. a better word might be "rationalize."

but is this issue of great concern for us gaijin? people are merely being asked for their ID to prove they are here legally. i don't hear anyone on this board saying that they were then harassed or frisked or physically abused in any way after being stopped by the police. so this matter in many ways is actually quite trivial.

0 ( +4 / -4 )

I've always gotten away with showing only my driver's license, just to see if I can.

To be honest I don't mind being approached by the cops here in Japan because they don't shake you down you for a bribe, as were my experiences in Thailand and Russia.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

Never been stopped, but I called police to report a squatter in an old house down the street from mine (I was afraid of fire). One rookie cop became aggressive, asking me for my ID - outside of my own house, and I was the guy who called them! - until another intervened. My kids have never been stopped, I don't think, but it would be interesting if they were: with Japanese nationality, they do not need to carry ID. Still, their fluency would likely overwhelm their appearance in the eyes of the cops.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

i thought you were japanese so why the "they"? btw, "obfuscate" means "to obscure or make something more difficult to understand." you're using the word incorrectly. a better word might be "rationalize."

No, they obfuscate the issue by pushing to change the discussion from one critical of Japan to something else and will do their damndest to ensure that Japanese dont come out looking bad.

Oh I am a Japanese citizen, but for as long as I live here I will always be seen as a foreigner because of my looks. Hence the "they".

5 ( +5 / -0 )

I've been stopped twice, once while lost in Kabukicho on a Tuesday afternoon and one while wandering way out in western Tokyo at 3:00 AM. Both times they police were polite and friendly. The second time, I happened to have a beer in hand, which I set on the ground to have two hands free. The second officer apologized profusely, picked up my beer, and held it while I fished out my ID.

In contrast, once in Chicago I was hit by a taxi and the police refused to let me file an accident report because they're [thing the comment system won't let me submit].

Not that there isn't corruption or anything, because of course there is, but I prefer Japanese police to American.

1 ( +4 / -3 )

I was stopped several times, in both Tokyo and Kansai. On one occasion I was stopped in Umeda but I'd left my wallet at home (in south Osaka) in my other pair of trousers - a simple, honest mistake, but a mistake I paid for with hours of my life that night, and hours more the following day with a healthy dose of humiliation as I was walked into my place of work flanked by uniformed officers so my manager could sign something. 10 cops were called to the scene for the initial 'arrest' or whatever that was, and the whole thing was completely and utterly ridiculous. They were having a slow night, I made a simple mistake, and they decided to make an example of me. I know I was unlucky and it doesn't usually go quite like that, but after that, I would go out of my way to not go past kobans at night, to avoid intersections where I knew they like to wait and stop people, and generally wanted to avoid any contact at all with the police, just in case I came across another overzealous cop or I was accidentally doing something wrong.

8 ( +8 / -0 )

If the cops try to stop you in Japan I suggest you drop everything and run like hell.

-10 ( +3 / -13 )

Those who feel put out by the requirement that foreign nationals have either their passport or a zairyu card on their person at all times should read this Wikipedia article.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Identity_document

A number of countries including some European countries have identity card requirements for their citizens that are at least as strict as those of Japan for foreign nationals.

-1 ( +5 / -6 )

On the times I've been to Japan I've been asked for ID by police twice... and that was the same day - once at the station under Narita while going to the Skyliner... and once on the platform waiting for said Skyliner. On both occasions the officer saluted after handing me back my passport.

I've been stopped since then, and to be honest I don't mind...

-5 ( +1 / -6 )

Not been stopped

-3 ( +2 / -5 )

Of course, the police sometimes stop people for more serious matters, including checking foreigners’ residence cards or passports to make sure they’re not illegally present in the country.

Wc626JUL said: And if they are found to be illegal, they are deported. Amazing how that concept works huh. Kudos Japan. You're a nation of laws.

Sure. A nation of laws where the police seem to think they have the ability to randomly fish for people who may be breaking the laws. "Papers! Show me your identification papers!"

5 ( +8 / -3 )

41 years...never been stopped.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

Been stopped twice, and one of those times I wasn't on a bike registered to me... Let's not do that again.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

As others have rightly pointed out, there is NO requirement for Japanese citizens to either identify themselves to police, nor to carry any form of ID. This leads to a nice Catch-22.... if stopped by the police, simply claim to be a Japanese citizen. They cannot ask you to prove it, as Japanese citizens don't HAVE TO prove their status. Without suspicion of a crime, the cops can't hold you after that.

Of course, this would take big stones to do. Actually, I remember a case a few years back of a Japanese young lady who was questioned by the police, She was very shy and socially awkward, so she refused to answer. Result? They took her to the police station anyway and searched her bags until they came up with her home phone number, called her family, and confirmed her citizenship. Unbelievable.

1 ( +4 / -3 )

Another proof of police officer stupid profiling, I was riding on my bicycle as well as my Chinese girlfriend. I was stopped by officer to verify if it was my bicycle and it took my gaijin card and even after he got the confirmation it was mine, he wrote the number of my card on his book note. He refused to give me reason why he had to write the number.

By the way, my girlfriend was not bringing her gaijin card (always forgot it) and she has never been checked by police in 15 years here and neither her family. What else ?

4 ( +5 / -1 )

@diobrando, Chinese immune from JP immigration laws just like Mexicans immune from US immigration laws.

2 ( +4 / -2 )

Did you know you are not supposed to give your resident's card to police? You can show them you have one, but you should not give it to them. The only people who you can give it to are immigration officers.

It's very interesting. Do you have the law number for that please ?

3 ( +3 / -0 )

Can't say I've ever been stopped by Police in Japan before. Been through the check points where they test all of the drivers.

Been here 8 years and have driven by police on my scooter and in my car. Never even been asked for my ID other than one time when I was parked in the city waiting to pick my wife up after work. It was at night and I had been sitting there in my car for about an hour. (wife had to work late) I looked pretty suspicious as it was winter and I had a big neck warmer on and a hat -- wearing both hid my face pretty well. Was just trying to stay warm instead of running the car. They just asked what I was doing and I said I was waiting to pick up my wife and they were like, "OK" and bounced. Not the best police in Osaka but I've never been unfairly targeted.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

So let's see... there's something wrong if the police don't stop you? Having been stopped in the same place on the same day a few hundred meters apart ONCE makes my experience unusual does it?

-3 ( +1 / -4 )

This article is complete BS. I use to get stopped by the police i both Roppongi and Shinjuku on an average of 3 or 4 times a month. It's purely racial profiling the police chief at Roppongi station has admitted it.

3 ( +6 / -3 )

The racial profiling is BS... I have an interest in Japanese police cars so stopped at a koban and took reference photos with a BIG camera and not one copper asked me to move on let alone ask for ID. I think if you are stopped and asked for your ID they are doing basically what police do in Europe.

Carrying a passport everywhere can be annoying yes, but I'd rather have proof of ID on me than to be frogmarched down to the local cop shop and quizzed about my identity and reason for being in the country etc...

What people here seem to be objecting to are measures similar to what they want to see for Muslims. To the Japanese police we are foreigners are an unknown factor - yes we are mostly tourists or residents, or even Japanese citizens, but there are also those who illegally stay on in Japan, those who are possibly criminals or foreign gang members... and not all terrorists are bearded Arabic men.

Or am I being too sensible?

-8 ( +1 / -9 )

Showing your passport or resident card to police when in a foreign country has always been a non-issue for me. It's why you're supposed to be carrying them in the first place! If I started getting stopped every city block, however, it would rapidly become an issue. It sounds like that's not what's happening in Japan. During the week I spent in Tokyo there was a time I could have used an officer nearby due to over-aggressive touts in Kabukicho, but I eventually resolved things by threatening to call the police (an empty threat as I had no cell service in Japan.) During my entire week of walking to and from the hotel, I never saw the police on that street. I finally came across the Kabukicho Police station one night while walking deeper into the section. There were 10 or 12 officers just standing outside the station. So THAT'S where they've been all this time!

2 ( +2 / -0 )

I think it's just random, really. Sometimes I'll go as long as six months without being stopped, then I'll get stopped 3 times within a week, lol.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

15 years. Stopped about 3 times and they were all towards the end. I'm far more interested in seeing how to handle the "can we search your bag?" instance. I used to just want to get out of there so let them, but I think as a grumpier old man I'd rather sacrifice the time to stand up for my civil liberties.

5 ( +5 / -0 )

Mikel i like your style! i must try this!!

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Not to mention the trouble being forced to miss your train may cause.

Funny you should say that. A friend of mine was on his way home after we'd been drinking and had to change at Shinjuku, but got there with about a minute to dash to another JR platform and as he lived in deepest darkest Kanagawa there was no way he was going to miss the last train. On the way down the steps that he was taking 2 at a time two policemen put their hands out to try and stop him and were like "Etto, err, residence car..." but my friend just shouted "SORRY NO TIME!" and legged it past them to the platform. They didn't follow him and it shows how important these stop and searches really are if they just let people run off if they feel like it.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

You asked the same number of whites and the same number of people of color, and the results will be surprisingly different. well its not surprising since the majority of visa overstayers come from asian african countries.

2 ( +4 / -2 )

Big deal, show your card get on with your day. I do not get nervous in japan around law enforcement like I do in the states and I used to be in the sheriff's department for two years.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

Those who feel put out by the requirement that foreign nationals have either their passport or a zairyu card on their person at all times should read this Wikipedia article.

This is typical behavior of a Japanese person, deflect and obfuscate the topic to take the spotlight off of Japan and put it on another country.

Here is the message....it doesn't matter! It doesn't matter if an ID card is needed on Mars, the discussion is about JAPAN making comparisons to "other" places takes the invasive feeling that people have about the cops and get it thrown out the window. Just because somewhere else does it, does not mean it has to happen here.

If this country is supposed to be so safe why stop people for no reason? See that's part of the problem, by keeping reported crimes statistics so low, and not the reality, the cops and media have created an image of safe here, and when foreigners read that, they get pissed off when cops stop- them because getting stopped by a cop typically means something is wrong. People by nature are wary of cops.

1 ( +5 / -4 )

@Gary Raynor

Do you have a y stats to back up this statement? "..but it isn't an aggressively institutionally racist society like the USA, where you could get shot quite easily for sticking out".

@Nakanoguy01

When you are stopped on the street, everyone takes note. If this is not near your home or your workplace, maybe no problem. If in front you child's school or classmate's parent and you can expect problems.

Not to mention the trouble being forced to miss your train may cause.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

14 years in Japan and never been stopped. I even got reprimanded by a policeman for crossing the road against the traffic signal right opposite a koban but he didn't ask for any ID, just said don't do it again.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

@YUBARU

"..i may have citizenship now.."

meaning you weren't originally a japanese citizen?? that is very surprising as you seem to talk shit about my country all the time but still you applied (or accepted?) for a citizenship?

-5 ( +3 / -8 )

Here is the message....it doesn't matter! It doesn't matter if an ID card is needed on Mars, the discussion is about JAPAN making comparisons to "other" places takes the invasive feeling that people have about the cops and get it thrown out the window. Just because somewhere else does it, does not mean it has to happen here.

Maybe the invasive feeling should be thrown out the window. People who come from other countries including some European countries where even citizens are required to always have an ID on their person and are required to show it to cops upon request are very unlikely to feel "invaded" if a Japanese cop asks them for their zairyu card.

Foreign comparisons are very relevant here because "foreigners" do not come from just one country and share a common background. Something that might bug the hell out of an American might seem perfectly normal for a Korean. Even Anglophone foreigners do not share a common experience. There are things in Japan that look very strange from an American perspective but seem perfectly normal from a British perspective. I have both.

Further, it's the law. If you don't like it, that's tough. When I lived in California, I had to show proof that I was old enough to buy beer even when I was in my early fifties. I thought this was stupid and invasive. But, that's the law.

When I lived in Britain before I had permanent residency, I had to register with the police and pay 70 quid to do so. I thought the law was stupid and invasive. Saying the law was "stupid and invasive" would not have impressed a court had I violated the law.

-8 ( +1 / -9 )

Police have admitted to me that they do a type of profiling. Ever notice how it's often younger officers that stop you? If you look the role and have a "normal" routine you may very well never be stopped, but trainees are given profiles and told to find as many WALDOS as they can, Casual dress on a mamachari at the wrong time and a certain hairstyle may get you nabbed. I was being stopped almost weekly in Arakawa. I got stopped in front of my own shop where a picture of me was hanging and finally after years of cooperation went ballistic after the officer began asking stupid questions to trip me up. ("shopping? Where? Oh, there's no such store near here!"). I put in a complaint, and also snapped and tweeted a picture of the cops (don't do that, it's illegal!) --called the precinct and complained. The community officer came to my shop explained that the officers were young and acted inappropriately. Since the I've only been stopped twice in 2 years and both times were my fault (biking with earphones.). --I don't recommend angrily confronting officers, but if it happens routinely, log and document it and ask to meet with the community relations officer. (I'm sorry, I forgot the Japanese word...)

9 ( +10 / -1 )

I've never been stopped by anybody anywhere. Maybe I look boring.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

Last semester I asked my foreign students whether any had ever been asked to show their zairyu cards. Only one had, a Hong Kong Chinese. When I queried him as to a possible reason, he said he had been somewhat rowdy with his mates late at night and they had been speaking English. Others who I thought might have been hassled including a black Swiss national said cops never gave them a second glance.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

Only time I was approached was one evening. A young buck was trying to prove himself. He came to me as I was on my charinka. He pushed for my lights to be on as it was dusk. I answered angrily because my lights WERE on. He backed off and I left. Poor guy.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

I was stopped once at the Tokyo station by a plaincloth police officer. I admit - I looked a little odd for the central Tokyo, I was going to a mountain hike and I was wearing military style cargo pants, olive drab jacket and jungle boots. I looked like a soldier without a gun or like uyoku. I showed by ID, said I was going to the mountains, and he let me go without any further questions.

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

It being the law should never be the end of any discusdion of what the law should be. Turning in those different was the law under Nazi control.

Besides, as others have pointed out, many of these stops, especially those of Japanese nationals, are not legal and thus are not the law.

Just because it is done elsewhere does not excuse bad practice. Two wrongs don't make a right.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

@japan T My understanding is that they're perfectly legal (went to a lawyer at one point.). As long as the officer has an excuse, it's considered an "investigation".

0 ( +1 / -1 )

I used to get stopped all the time riding my motorcycle back in the late 70s. The J-cops faces were hilarious when I'd take my helmet off with it's dark visor and they'd see I was a Yanqui. Didn't have to have a passport back then. Don't know if they do now days. Just a military ID card. Something to do with the SOFA agreement. It would baffle the hell out of the J-cops. Especially, if I was far away from base. They'd ask me, "You speak Japanese," and I'd reply, "Me no Speak 'em Japanese," I remember listening to the conversation they were having amongst themselves after they stopped me at a Nezumi-Tor. It went something like this: "What do we do with him? He doesn't have a passport. His drivers license has the base as his address. He is from Yamaguch Prefecture. This is way to much trouble. Let's just tell him to slow down and let him go."

They'd give my ID back and say, "Speed down, Speed down, OK." I'd say with a big cheezy grin, "Ok, Me Speed down. Me no Speed, OK." They'd return the toothy grin with a thumbs up and a hearty, "Ok! Ok!" Off I'd go. Hell, one time they even fixed a flat tire for me that I had gotten in the Nezumi-Tori's Parking lot.

Sounds like it as gotten really strict. Like they don't even let the Jarheads off the bases anymore. Also, back then, if I got more than two miles from base, I wouldn't see another foreigner. Went back this last winter... dang.. the J-Police were everywhere~. Tons of police around the base too. Maybe cause there was some kind of summit going on.

-2 ( +2 / -4 )

I know it's hard for some to swallow, but cops can and will stop you and ask for you to identify yourself just because you're a foreigner. Only suspecting you of being an illegal gives them all the right to demand that you identify yourself and even take further action, if required.

Now, if you want to be 「the gaijin™」 and just say you won't hand it over because "muh rights and freedoms", they have every right to be angry with you as you will a) draw more suspicion upon you and b) only make their work harder just because you want to be edgy and not cooperate.

There is literally no reason to not cooperate with the cops. It's not America, it's not Britain, its NOT wherever the heck you're from - it's JAPAN. So YOU have to put up with whatever special rules apply to you and accept that you don't have the same privileges as Japanese people. Should you be unable to do so, please see yourself out and stop giving other foreigners a bad name. Thank you.

郷に入っては郷に従え

1 ( +5 / -4 )

Police should be able to stop anyone everywhere to be legally obligated to produce IDs

-6 ( +0 / -6 )

I used to get stopped all the time riding my motorcycle back in the late 70s. The J-cops faces were hilarious when I'd take my helmet off with it's dark visor and they'd see I was a Yanqui.

In other words, they were not stopping you because you were a foreign national but because you were a guy on a bike riding too fast or doing something else that caught your attention?

2 ( +4 / -2 )

I would say carry a nice wallet with your "foreigner" ID card very handy and up front and act like they check you all the time. If you are running short on time ask for them to take a photo of the ID card or just email the ID card + plus give a cell phone number. Have a back-up picture of your card on your phone/tablet etc.

If you are a runner or cyclist having this ID card on you at all times is a huge pain. Encapsulate the card in a hard card case to keep it neat and undamaged. Maybe have a hole on/in encapsulation to clip it to your body.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

Twice in 15 years, both in a major train station, and both times by a rookie cop being trained by a veteran cop. Annoying, but a small price to pay for the positives of life here. One question, if you're swimming, do you have to have your residence card in the pool with you? Seriously, I wonder.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

In my twelve years in Japan, I think I was "stopped" once, and it was for parking my bike in a no bicycle parking area. The officer was nice enough, but made sure I knew what was going on and why I was being told to move my bike.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

@San_Diegan (or anyone else who may know) I'm a US Air Force reservist and come to Japan on vacation or short TDY's. I know the law requires a temporary visitor to carry a passport with you at all times. However, I don't like carrying my passport around in my pocket when out on the town in fear of losing or damaging it. Would producing a valid military ID suffice if stopped by police in lieu of a passport?

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Yesterday, I went to renew my driver's license and when I finished, I realized I forgot my keys at home. I have a bicycle lock that doesn't require a key to lock, but you definitely need one to open it up.

I wasn't allowed to leave my bike at the registration office so I ended up carrying it back home (about 5km). Along the way you can probably imagine all the stares I got. A foreigner carrying a locked bicycle (not super expensive, but it's definitely NOT the cheap kind).

I passed by one group of hard core cyclists that eyed me for a whole block, but not one person stopped me, or even asked what I was doing.

I passed by several kobans and one marked car with it's lights going and I passed through all that without being stopped.

Although I've never been stopped I'm not under any delusion that there is no racism going on. In fact, if anything, my situation even strengthens that argument. Why the heck was I NOT stopped carrying a locked and expensive (looking) bicycle?

If I were an officer, I would definitely have stopped someone doing that just to make sure things were on the up and up.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Dude stopped me at Narita, once. He just wanted to practice his English.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

@Eddie Landberg

There is of course the law as written and the law as practiced. Your use of "excuse" instead of "reason" leads me to believe you know this.

My spouse, Japanese, found an article in Japanese talking about this. It is against the law for Jcops to stop and search a JN without probable cause. HOWEVER, refusing a Jcops "request" to search your bag gives them probable cause to search your bag...according to the article.

Aparently, they can not use any kind of force to compel a JN to allow a search. If a JN just stands there and refuses to comply, all that can be done is prevent him from leaving and a waiting game ensues. Actually saw a guy do that for a couple of hours.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Actually, even while swimming and your pants are on the beach and the card is in your pocket, by law you are committing an offence.The cop will/can take you to the koban without collecting your clothes. This happened to a friend of mine and he wasn't released until his wife brought his pants to the koban and showed the card to them. As a resident, it is not necessary to keep on producing other id such as a passport, nor to have a lengthy conversation with the police without a reason.

5 ( +5 / -0 )

Never stopped in 20 years and always rolled my eyes at gaijin who complained about getting stopped. Then .... three times in six months. And the first time my old card had expired but that was okay because i still had 6 months to go before getting the new style card. But I was photographed, told not to use my phone, and taken to a police station. There I showed my passport etc etc.

Believe it or not the IDIOT policeman wasn't satisfied with the Permanent Resident stamp and wanted to see my certificate for it. He didn't believe me when I said the stamp in the passport IS the certificate and there is probably no such thing as a certificate. They checked it out realised everything was okay.

But it actually took eight policeman to come and make sure I wasn't going to be violent. 50 year old white guy. I couldn't believe it. Next time I was just looking at a building wondering what it was and two cops wanted to check all through my bag.

I've always been completely co-operative with police and was always critical of what I called smart alec gaijin who refused to show it or complained.

Sorry, but after the third time and seeing the complete ignorance of policeman, and the way it takes 8 of the them two hours to achieve what one person could do in five minutes with a phone call to the immigration office, I've lost all respect for these dullards.

They're hopeless.

But, maybe its good because I've come to understand how frustrating it is to be treated differently.

Two police cars and 8 policeman...because of a card that was in order.

I did get a sorry.

But imagine that. "Don't use your phone!" So what if you miss out on going to work and can't contact anyone.

Sorry, I've developed a bad attitude. I never had one.

So those of you who say how long you've been here - I was once like you. Probably also depends on where you live.

9 ( +9 / -0 )

Yeah, I too always thought that you must being doing something wrong to get carded. Getting stopped yourself really changes one perspective.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

"If a police officer asks for your ID, you are legally obligated to show it." WRONG. You are not obligated to show it unless they have probable cause. An officer has the right to ask you but you also have the right to refuse. Penal Code Article 194.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

really? that's how you interpret Article 194?

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

Been stopped probably 8 times in 12 years. Half of them by the same police officer in the same place in Tokyo (my suburban neighborhood). Once randomly walking out of my own station and asked for ID. I showed them. It was during the transition between foreigner registrations systems that my card came up for renewal. The city office couldn't offer me the new card yet so they placed a sticker on it indicating my status. The police officer went through all of my stuff (knapsack) and patted me down right there in the station and told me they were taking me to the station because I wasn't carrying my passport. I told them I didn't need to and explained but they didn't listen. Called my wife (as I was heading to pick up my kids from daycare) and she explained and it still wasn't enough. Offered to take them to my house to see my passport. Nope. Going downtown. After about 4 hours of sitting in an interrogation room and going through all of my stuff and I would guess photocopying they decided they could let me go because they found I was doing nothing illegal. At all. Suggested I carry my passport. I explained that I’m not a tourist. They said I was free to go and suggested I take a cab home (the station was far from any eki and strangely quite far from my house or the neighborhood they picked me up in). That was enough to piss me off after keeping polite for this long and told them no, they will be driving me to my doorstep and I will be showing them my passport and they will be talking to my then very pissed off wife. Went to immigration office next week to get the new card because apparently the police aren’t as well informed as they need to be and explained to the officer who was shocked and agreed I was completely in the right. Haven’t been stopped in my neighborhood since then (a couple of years). Curious that isn’t it?

0 ( +0 / -0 )

****In 1982 I was stopped by Haneda police and required to show my Alien Registration booklet every Sunday evening for 2 months. I always asked them how they knew I was a foreigner. Eventually they stopped stopping me. Provided you are not doing anything suspicious you have the right to insist that THEY show their ID first.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Only been stopped once in 8 years and it was a bicycle issue back in my first year. Since then nothing. Not a fan of police in general, but if I had to pick the best cops to deal with, Japan would be the top. Most of the time very polite and nice guys to chat with.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Been here 31 years, never been stopped, but have had my share of tickets. However, I cannot even begin to count the number of times the cops have given me dirty looks when they go by: existing freely in their country while being foreign, guilty as charged.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Never happened - in 30 plus trips to Japan - from Hokkaido to Kyushu and Okinawa.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

I live in Suginami-Ku and since i moved to this area i got stopped 12 times in 9 months.. Usually, i get stopped by same police, They ask for my ID and if i live in the Area.. They are nice, but sometime its kind of uncomfortable especially if its 12 times less than a year!!

0 ( +0 / -0 )

I got stopped a couple of times in my first 2 years here but fortunately haven't been in the last 10 years. I'm a lot better behaved these days anyway.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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