lifestyle

Here’s what Japanese people really think about Marie Kondo

17 Comments
By Kelsey Lark

It’s hard to find any fault with everyone’s favorite kawaii tidying expert, Marie Kondo. Her approach to cleaning, dubbed the “KonMari” method, has people around the world organizing their living spaces to spark joy and rushing to the nearest thrift store to offload their junk.

When her Netflix series "Tidying Up With Marie Kondo" debuted on Jan 1 this year, Kondo’s popularity skyrocketed and with it the comedic creativity of the internet, resulting in some truly excellent Marie Kondo jokes like this:

Marie-Kondo-meme.jpg

And this:

Screen Shot 2019-01-18 at 8.32.55.png

Marie Kon-who?

One marked difference between the response in Japan compared to overseas is that, well, no one really seems to care here. There’s little coverage in the media and chatter online is limited; most Japanese people don’t appear to be caught up in the hype.

Exploring the Japanese Twitterverse further, the few reactions to Marie Kondo at first show confused surprise at her success abroad.

Click here to read more.

© GaijinPot

©2019 GPlusMedia Inc.

17 Comments
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Her methods should only really apply to hoarders. The majority of Japanese people, regardless of how much they minimize, are still going to have crap everywhere in their small Japanese house.

I watched the first episode and all I saw was a beautiful home with a few clothes lying in the closet and some boxes in the garage. Hoarding is a whole other level.

Overall, the show was pretty boring. If I wanted to watch a house cleaning show, I would watch Queer Eye. It is much more entertaining and funny at that.

1 ( +5 / -4 )

It’s possible to make a living dealing in collectibles and antiques etc but this show is the antithesis ...

-1 ( +3 / -4 )

I read her book as soon as it'd been published. So, I don't remember it in detail, but I came to think about possessions. Buying things makes us happy temporarily, but doesn't last long. Why do we buy so many unnecessary things? Things occupy our space in the house. We are usually stressed out by our possessions. Spark joy, proposed by Kon Mari, is a good indicator to keep things or throw away. I can throw away almost anything, but there are the things I cannot throw away. Books. I've been reading many books for a decade to improve my English skills. Now, I don't have any place to store my books in my house. I read bools repeatedly, so it is hard for me to throw them away. I tried an e-reader, Kindle, but I usually gave up reading on the device. I don't know why this happens. I can finish reading whenever I read paperbacks. Is there anyone who feels the same way?

1 ( +4 / -3 )

What's to teach? If it's messy clean it up, throw out any crap you don't need, fold crap really small to fit it in a drawer. Dusting? Maybe.

2 ( +5 / -3 )

Most people likely don't think about her at all...

4 ( +5 / -1 )

Considering the state of most Japanese homes (hoarders!), she would have her work cut out here.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

Trust me, here in Italy, no-one gives a flying. She's an idiot. what she does is common around all of Japan. Her poor English, and irritating kawaiiness is insulting.

0 ( +4 / -4 )

She's an idiot.

Ach, she's not too bad. I don't subscribe to her ideas about getting rid of books, but each to their own.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

I read bools repeatedly, so it is hard for me to throw them away. I tried an e-reader, Kindle, but I usually gave up reading on the device. I don't know why this happens. I can finish reading whenever I read paperbacks. Is there anyone who feels the same way?

Completely. I much prefer the feel, weight and aroma of a book. I tend to buy from charity shops and second hand stores but I do occasionally (much to my regret) have to have a spring clean, simply because of space issues. If I could, I'd have a library!

The electronic books are fine if you're wishing to travel light but it does take forever to read a novel. Although, it was Moby Dick, which is a bit weighty in terms of literature. I now stick to short story collections if I'm doing the e-book/Kindle thing.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

 I now stick to short story collections if I'm doing the e-book/Kindle thing.

I agree on it. It is easier to read short stories on Kindle than long stories. Thank you!

0 ( +1 / -1 )

I lasted a minute into the first episode.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Anyone who says you should never have more than 30 books in the home is a moron and should be ignored. Books aren't clutter. They give me joy. I hope Ms Kondo has joy in her soulless, sterile home.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Kondo is an empty making money out of nonsense. People buying into this are being scammed and she doesn't even realise she's a scammer, she thinks she's the real deal. If you are a messy person, sort your lives out. All that house greeting stuff makes Japanese people look bad. Plus the 30 book thing, I doubt that kondo has ever read anything other than manga in her life, look at the thing.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

We have a whole wall used as a bookcase, floor to ceiling, about 3m long, and it's full. I like seeing the books, plus they serve as extra insulation. I don't see the books as clutter at all.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

FireyReiJan. 20 05:55 pm JSTTrust me, here in Italy, no-one gives a flying. She's an idiot. what she does is common around all of Japan. Her poor English, and irritating kawaiiness is insulting.

I don't understand why anyone would even want to watch this garbage.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

there is no way I would keep only 30 books.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Jeez, articles with all these twitter quotes are so frustrating for me to read. Journalism is dead, if I cared about what twitter said i'd bloody be on it!

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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