lifestyle

Japan's weaker yen a blessing to some, burden for others

7 Comments
By YURI KAGEYAMA

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" from the Vietnamese" = Japanese

Typo mistake

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Meanwhile, Chinese has conquered Hokkaido and Kyoto.

https://news.yahoo.co.jp/articles/61e83fa4fca5d03c3945f954797e235ae1e1e72e

Vietnamese people like Mrs Tran are taking pretty all high-paying jobs from the Vietnamese at rapid speed, and they are also building Vietnamtowns across Japan along with the Chinese. It's merely less than two decades that you will see a very foreign Japan.

Thanks to the LDP and Abe for making Japan poorer that foreigners will take over!

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Definitely not complaining about a weak Yen. Been using the US credit card more often on larger purchases and get a great exchange rate, end up saving quite a bit sometimes. Also transferring money here from USD, you can benefit, just watch the rates daily and then pull the trigger on days it's back up near 130yen or higher.

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

Japan is like an ultra cheap third world country. And it will only get cheaper and cheaper for the multitudes who will descend on the country when permissible, to snap up everything, including dirt cheap properties. I know of several people overseas who just can't wait to go to Japan for all the amazing bargains on offer. Mr Allen is going to be so busy soon! But I can't imagine the ordinary Japanese people seeing this will be happy as inflation soars but wages and salaries stagnate or even fall.

-3 ( +2 / -5 )

Now is a good time to buy a home here if you have dollar savings.

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

I'm personally loving the weak yen, I'm hoping for a ¥150 a dollar soon.

-3 ( +3 / -6 )

"a nation notorious for meticulously saving" - media pieces with that sentiment were common and true throughout the 1980s but just a few years ago it was reported Japan's savings rate had fallen below zero. Cash handouts have upped the savings rate in the last couple of years but the idea that Japan is a country of savers is outdated.

4 ( +5 / -1 )

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