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Japanese company that will quit your job for you sees rush of clients to start 2020

17 Comments
By Casey Baseel, SoraNews24

Every year, Japan takes a much needed break for a couple days around New Year’s. Most offices shut down for at least the first three days of January, and many are closed for even longer, giving employees roughly a week off. For some people, that gives them the time they need to recharge before hopping right back into their jobs with renewed energy. For others, though, those few days away from work help make it crystal clear that they don’t want to go back at all, which is where Yasusaburo Takehara comes in.

Takehara is a lawyer with Osaka-based law firm Vogel, and his specialty is a service called taishoku daiko, which means “job-quitting proxy.” Basically, if you want to quit your job, Takehara and his staff will handle the resignation for you, letting your boss know that you won’t be back.

With most Japanese workers going back to the office on Jan 6 this year, Takehara says that he was inundated with requests from clients to deliver their notices of resignation to their bosses at either 8 or 9 a.m. on Monday morning, at the very moment their companies began work in the new year. As a matter of fact, he had so many requests to do so that he had to add on extra temporary staff in order to fill all of the similarly timed requests.

Vogel charges 30,000 yen for the service, but it’s about more than giving weak-backboned salarymen a way to quit their jobs without having to talk to a scary boss. Yes, being able to sever ties with a harassing workplace superior without a final blast of verbal fury or high-pressure speech about how they should remain with the company is a plus, but Takehara’s job-quitting proxy provides practical, financial benefits as well.

In addition to tendering your resignation, Takehara and his staff will also handle the meetings and discussions related to any as-yet unpaid salary or overtime fees, and also see to it that you receive any legally mandated severance pay, three streams of income that not all employers are cooperative in letting flow to an individual who’s planning to leave the company. Your job-quitting proxy will also act as your agent in making sure you are allowed to use, or otherwise compensated for, any vacation time you’ve accrued but not used, and also negotiate for favorable terms as far as when/how you’ll need to vacate any company-supplied or subsidized housing, a perk that’s not uncommon in corporate Japan.

While many of Takehara’s clients are white-collar workers, recently he’s also been receiving requests from politician’s aids, entertainment media professionals, hostesses and erotic masseuses, civil servants, and members of the Japan Self-Defense Forces. Some of these professions are especially in need of legal advice and representation, as Takehara says hostesses having to fight to receive their full final paycheck is a common problem, and SDF members’ employment is governed by a separate code of law than civilian positions. But regardless of what sort of industry you want out of, Takehara’s team is standing by, and promises on Vogel’s website that they can tell your boss he’s seen the last of you in as little as three hours after you make your request.

Related: Vogel

Sources: Nikkan Spa via Livedoor News via Jin, Vogel

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© SoraNews24

©2020 GPlusMedia Inc.

17 Comments
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Why not just tell your boss yourself? Oh wait, that would mean taking responsibility. Yeah, no.

3 ( +9 / -6 )

If someone didn't have the thingies to tell his boss he's quitting, I wouldn't hire him.

4 ( +9 / -5 )

If someone didn't have the thingies to tell his boss he's quitting, I wouldn't hire him.

A win-win situation, if ever there was one....

3 ( +4 / -1 )

How legal is that ?

You can't quit everything in your job suddenly for no specific reason without a due leaving notice period. That is a serious professional fault anf you'll end up getting minimal or no leaving package.

And also how can you be represented by a lawyer by paying him only 30000 yens ? That seems amazingly cheap.

Anyway, it is good to change job if you feel it strongly.

3 ( +5 / -2 )

I totally get it.

4 ( +5 / -1 )

Telling your boss to stick his job up his rear is one of the best parts of quitting a job. I wonder if this company provides a range of insults for its clients to chose from?

10 ( +10 / -0 )

If you have an abusive, foul or just plain nasty boss then I can understand people using this service. Not everyone likes confrontation - I try to avoid it personally - so this is an ideal way to avoid that highly emotional, highly stressful situation.

7 ( +8 / -1 )

I second Clippety, quitting your job (assuming you're leaving because you hate it and have somewhere else to go) is probably one of the best feelings an adult could ever experience. I've seen lots of my coworkers quit in my line of work and they always leave with a big smile on their face because it probably feels like being freed from a prison sentence. That being said, this is a nice stint this company is doing. I'm imagining their services could see a boom in the future once younger generations enter the workforce. But still, you really do need to have the cajones to (politely) confront people or else it will bite you in the long run

5 ( +5 / -0 )

There are few experiences more gratifying than telling an inadequate boss, directly to his face, that he can shove the job up his @rse.

5 ( +5 / -0 )

In addition to tendering your resignation, Takehara and his staff will also handle the meetings and discussions related to any as-yet unpaid salary or overtime fees, and also see to it that you receive any legally mandated severance pay, three streams of income that not all employers are cooperative in letting flow to an individual who’s planning to leave the company. Your job-quitting proxy will also act as your agent in making sure you are allowed to use, or otherwise compensated for, any vacation time you’ve accrued but not used, and also negotiate for favorable terms as far as when/how you’ll need to vacate any company-supplied or subsidized housing, a perk that’s not uncommon in corporate Japan

Just telling to quit it's not that difficult but what need to be done afterward like unpaid salary or overtime fees, big companies usually they already procedure in place and no hard feelings. Smaller one that can be really different, can end up in endless meeting that end up with less amount that should be able to get.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

I believe in any method possible that results in no endless meetings.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

Good point Tom.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

I'll do it for $200. Can I advertise service in japan if currently in the States?

0 ( +1 / -1 )

I love Japan, so innovative in business ideas. I wish this and many others would expand to Australia.

-4 ( +0 / -4 )

Considering that there are companies that will fire employees as proxies for their regular employers (eg "downsizers" , if you ever seen the George Clooney movie "Up in the Air" he plays one) , why not the other way around? Makes sense.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Sounds like a fun job. I'd happily do it.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

An innovation on prostitution and the old handyman.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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