lifestyle

Japanese Twitter user shares the phrase a man should never say to his wife

6 Comments
By Casey Baseel, RocketNews24

Compared to previous generations, Japanese men, on average, pitch in more with housework than their forefathers did. That said, many would argue that the division of domestic duties is far from even, with wives still doing more of the household chores than their husbands do.

This is especially true where meal preparation is concerned, with women doing the lion’s share of the cooking. The associated expectation, in some marriages, that the wife will take care of getting dinner ready for the husband doesn’t seem to sit well, though, with Japanese Twitter user @noske_nico.

The frustrated wife recently tweeted a photo of a handwritten note, with “Here’s something you should never say to your wife,” written at the very top. “I showed this to my husband,” tweeted @noske_nico, which makes it unclear whether or not she herself is the note’s original author. Her agreement with its contents are crystal clear, though, as she added “But I’d like all the men of the world to keep this in mind.”

The note reads:

Here’s something you should never say to your wife.

“What about my dinner?

When your wife is sick, tired, or busy, and she says 'I can’t make dinner tonight,' the male mind has a tendency to ask that question as it grasps the situation. However, when a woman hears that question, it registers as 'I don’t really understand what’s going on with you, but make my dinner.'

So when your wife says that, let’s take a deep breath, and say 'I’ll go pick up something to eat (or eat out), and do you want me to bring something back for you?'

It’s important to show concern about what your wife is going to eat. When she’s feeling poorly, this single phrase can have a big effect. So watch what you say."

@noske_nico’s advice swiftly resonated with other Internet users, with tens of thousands echoing her sentiment. Those who’d seen the sort of insensitivity @noske_nico is aggravated by were especially vocal in their agreement, with comments including:

“My ex-husband was the kind of person who always said [inconsiderate] things like that.”

“I think my mom went through that sort of thing with my dad, and it really seems like there are a lot of [thoughtless] guys like that.”

Others, though, thought that @noske_nico’s ideal communication style relied a little too much on conjecture, saying they’d prefer a more direct and open communication style.

“Look, I’m not a mind reader, so how about if we both just say what we’re thinking?”

“If my husband said [he was going to eat out], I’d at least ask him myself to pick something up for me too.”

But when it comes to true selflessness, no one topped this commenter’s father.

“If my mom isn’t feeling well, when my dad comes home from work, even if he’s feeling tired, he says ‘Are you OK? If you’ve got any appetite, I’ll go pick something up for you’ or ‘How about if I cook something?’ And afterwards, he even takes care of the dishes. My dad is really amazing like that.”

No word on whether Dad’s cooking tastes good or not, but we’re sure his wife appreciates it when she’s feeling bad.

Source: Jin

Read more stories from RocketNews24. -- Japanese men rank the top 10 complaints they hope to never hear from their wives -- Judge sets new line for adultery in landmark case, and it doesn’t involve intercourse -- Humbug! Japanese wives in international marriages share what they hate about Christmas overseas

© Japan Today

©2019 GPlusMedia Inc.


6 Comments
Login to comment

the division of domestic duties is far from even, with wives still doing more of the household chores than their husbands do.

Not in my house. My wife works very hard, and I do the housework (except for cooking) to show my appreciation, and give her a chance to relax. I can tell when my wife doesn't feel like cooking, and I'll go get something for us to eat.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

I'll go get something for us to eat.

:O !!!

There is a paperback book called 'Japanese Vegetable Cooking' by Asako Tohata that is very nice, with nice photos and simple instructions in English, and cheap ($6.55 new, a few bucks used, on Amazon). I picked mine up on clearance at an electronics outlet, but it's buried somewhere so I may buy another copy.

And there are several books with "3 Ingredient", "4 Ingredient", and "5 Ingredient" in the titles.

A couple other good ones I can think of are James Peterson's "Sauces" and Edouard de Pomiane's "(French) Cooking in 10 Minutes". de Pomiane was a Polish-French doctor who was also a celebrity chef at the time he wrote this in 1930. He writes to busy persons about how to cook a meal quickly after arriving home from work. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cuisine_en_dix_minutes

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

What ? No click here to read more ?

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Don't hand me stupid irritating notes after I've come home from a 2-hour commute and a 10-hour workday: husband. Both of us are important in this relationship. Have you noticed that I go to work regularly, even when I am feeling sick, tired or overworked?

4 ( +5 / -1 )

"This is especially true where meal preparation is concerned, with women doing the lion’s share of the cooking. The associated expectation, in some marriages, that the wife will take care of getting dinner ready for the husband doesn’t seem to sit well, though, with Japanese Twitter user @noske_nico."

Noske_niko sounds like she's got a few problems of her own -- namely shoving a note she likely wrote in her partner's face and telling him never to say something he likely did not. No one should say that kind of thing, man or woman, nor should there be a whole thread about "what men should not say to wives" as though it's something we're all already guilty of potentially doing.

In any case, it's me who does the lion's share of both housework and in particular cooking. I've never gotten angry at my partner, who sometimes says, "I'm hungry!" implying that I should hurry up, and if I were angry that others do it I wouldn't take it out on her.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

I dont mind cooking every now and then for my wife and kids but most the time my food is too heavy for them I when the missus is feeling sick I usally order something or cook something light doing the dishes is also no really a problem since my daugther helps out with simple tasks.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Login to leave a comment

Facebook users

Use your Facebook account to login or register with JapanToday. By doing so, you will also receive an email inviting you to receive our news alerts.

Facebook Connect

Login with your JapanToday account

User registration

Articles, Offers & Useful Resources

A mix of what's trending on our other sites