lifestyle

Magazine survey picks Japan’s 10 best places to live in

62 Comments
By Casey Baseel

The idea of living in a high-rise condo in downtown Tokyo makes for a nice daydream. Between the high cost of housing and the inescapable hustle and bustle of Japan’s capital, though, when it comes time to actually pick a home, many people decide they’d rather live in one of Japan’s other cities, or one of Tokyo’s suburbs at least.

Underlining this trend are the results of a survey by newly formed magazine Aene which asked Japanese housewives which town they’d be happiest living in. Central Tokyo failed to crack the top 10, although the No. 1 pick isn’t too far away from the capital.

As part of the survey, Aene created a set of parameters it dubbed Happy Quality, which evaluated the towns based on their family-friendliness, economic factors, food and health conditions, access to entertainment, and overall convenience of daily life.

Perhaps as a result of focusing on the opinions of people who don’t work outside the home, only five of the top 10 were rated as having local economic conditions above the survey average. On the other hand, all of the highest-rated towns performed extremely well in the other four categories, with study participants showing a particular fondness for areas with parks or other natural environments, good schools, and historical significance.

When asked what specifically was indicative of a convenient place to live, the second-most common response was proximity to a train or subway station, which was given by 28.9% of the women in the study. Far surpassing this, though, was the 47.8% who answered that what they really wanted was a large mall, supermarket, or shopping street.

The reason behind this is a little more complex than just “Women shop a lot,” as shopping is often connected to several of the parameters in Aene’s Happy Quality index. Toshio Noguchi, a professor of marketing at Japan’s prestigious Waseda University, points out that how and when Japanese consumers shop has changed, giving the activity a different role in family dynamics. “Until recently, it was the norm for housewives to do shopping each day at local retailers. Now, though, we’re seeing more families going shopping together at larger centers on the weekend, buying in bulk. Necessary shopping itself has become a form of leisure, and malls are becoming a place where communication within the family happens.”

So, which towns in Japan ranked the highest in the survey? Let’s start with number 10.

10. Hiroshima City (Hiroshima Prefecture)

Respondents were impressed by the kind and friendly attitude of Hiroshima’s citizens. Being the prefectural capital means it’s a developed city, but not nearly as crowded as Tokyo.

9. Nihama (Ehime Prefecture)

The first of two towns on the island of Shikoku to make the list, Nihama offers both job opportunities with local industry and proximity to the Inland Sea and its delicious seafood.

8. Moriya (Ibaraki Prefecture)

Moriya’s Happy Quality was balanced across the five criteria, with special mention given to its modern shopping facilities.

7. Ikoma (Nara Prefecture)

Ikoma is essentially a suburb of Nara City, being just 30 minutes away by train. Its high ranking was due in no small part to its proximity to the many culturally and historically important temples of Japan’s former capital.

6. Fukuoka City (Fukuoka)

One of the most populous cities in the top 10, Fukuoka got a boost from its local food scene which includes delicacies such as spicy cod roe, hot-pot, and pork stock ramen.

5. Matsuyama (Ehime Prefecture)

Back in Ehime again, living in the relatively cozy prefectural capital still provides for a laid-back lifestyle, plus proximity to some of Japan’s best citrus fruit and one of its oldest hot springs, Dogo Onsen.

4. Mitaka City (Tokyo)

Technically still part of Tokyo, Mitaka lies outside the metropolis’ 23 main wards. Easy access to central Tokyo, the lush greenery of Inokashira Park, and the nearby Ghibli Museum all contribute to Mitaka’s elegant and sophisticated vibe.

3. Nishinomiya (Hyogo Prefecture)

Situated between the much larger cities of Kobe and Osaka, Nishinomiya lets residents enjoy the fantastic food of each, including Kobe beef, takoyaki, kushi katsu, and the wonders of Kobe’s Chinatown. It’s also the home of Koshien, Japan’s most storied baseball stadium that hosts both Osaka’s professional team, the Hanshin Tigers, and the country’s twice-annual high school tournament championships. It’s also become a bit of a shopper’s paradise due to its numerous malls.

2. Inagi City (Tokyo)

Lying just outside the 23 wards, Inagi has a shocking amount of greenery if your only image of Tokyo is the Shibuya Scramble intersection. It isn’t limited to parks, either, as the town is also where you’ll find the Otsuka Farm. Life in Inagi isn’t completely bucolic, though, as the town also has its own branches of Costco and Ikea.

1. Fujisawa (Kanagawa Prefecture)

Taking home the top spot is Fujisawa, the coastal city in Kanagawa which includes Enoshima Island. Fujisawa combines the relaxed atmosphere you’d expect from a beach town with extremely convenient public transportation, as a train ride from Enoshima Station to Shinjuku, in the heart of Tokyo, will take you less than 30 minutes. Add in centuries-old temples, colorful local legends about fearsome dragons falling in love with beautiful princesses, and breathtaking sunset views of Mount Fuji, and it’s easy to see why Fujisawa is loved not just by housewives, but by anyone who can appreciate nature, history, or just the relaxing sound of the waves.

Sources: Dot, Aene

Read more stories from RocketNews24. -- Travelers rank Japan’s 20 best castles -- Japan’s 20 best free sightseeing spots -- Foreign visitors pick the 20 coolest places in Japan

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62 Comments
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Things change; so do bests. Most of us wind up liking it where we're at. There's a sentimental saying that goes "Home is where the heart is" and I've heard it jokingly paraphrased as "Home is where the hat is." We could paraphrase it further by saying, "Best is where the hat is."

4 ( +5 / -1 )

I would put Urayasu, City as one of best places live... convenient, food, hotels, Disney, bayside, wide sidewalks for walking or jogging, parks, close to Tokyo...friendly!

0 ( +2 / -2 )

This is such a personal question that its almost pointless to have a survey. It's like the top 10 liveable cities list, whatever that means. If you're rich enough to enjoy all the amenities, almost everywhere will be comfortable, if you're poor, everywhere is pretty horrible.

10 ( +11 / -1 )

I agree with Matsuyama being on the list. A really nice medium sized city with a good vibe.

I'm not so sure about Niihama though. The water over there isn't very clean due to it being an industrial along the waterfront and the rest of the city is rather plain.

Fujisawa is a great place! But wish the surf there was a bit bigger and much more consistent otherwise I'd live there.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

I live in Zushi and have always been annoyed by the heavy traffic in Fujisawa area. Therefore, I can't agree on the idea of Fujisawa being #1.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

Roppongi should be near the top of this list, heck, you've got yer Hard Rock Cafe, you've got yer Outback Steakhouse, you've got yer TFI Fridays, you've got yer Don Quihote, you've got yer Wendy's, you've got yer Samrat...

-10 ( +3 / -11 )

Nishinomiya? WTF are there people on meds? Used to live near there and still go around there at times. The Malls are your regular Aeon type thing. Yeah, it has good transport links but it is far from an attractive place to live.

4 ( +6 / -2 )

The idea of living in a high-rise condo in downtown Tokyo makes for a nice daydream.

Wow, they lost me in the very first sentence. More like a concrete nightmare. One of the last places I would choose to live.

I'd choose where I live now - well, I did choose, obviously. Definitely not the city, not downtown, not high-rise. If you want more city-like amenities (the shopping facilities mentioned in the article, plus green spaces and parks for kids) I understand the outskirts of Inzai in Chiba fit the bill. Matsuyama has a nice, laid-back atmosphere, as does Toyama which also has plenty of fresh seafood if that's your thing. I think people in the survey named the place where they live - like CrazyJoe reminds us, Home is Where the Heart Is.

3 ( +5 / -2 )

As expected shopping & transport are the most desirable aspects of a place to live for these people.

Even in my mid-size regional city which is so easy to get around and incorporates natural area or is is close to lots , so many people want to live right next to / near supermarkets, conbinis, stations, banks, & hospitals.

Which is why a city like Nishinomiya rates so high, but wouldn't get a look in by me. Clean air, greenery & calm are essential.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Funny, I had a girlfriend from Fujisawa. She told me it was terrible place to live, mainly because of the "anti-social" types who inhabit the town. She wouldn't walk in many areas at night.

"IInagi has a shocking amount of greenery"

Mostly private golf courses. Greenery isn't quite so charming when its behind secure barriers and you're not allowed to enter without paying hefty fees.

3 ( +5 / -2 )

Lived in Mitaka. Great place.

5 ( +5 / -0 )

Great survey.

Runs contrary to the naysayers who portray Japan as an unfriendly, xenophobic, astronomically expensive place to live.

While I don't agree Japan is as safe as it once was.

-1 ( +4 / -5 )

These cities are also pretty big... Why not have a survey about which street, and specifically which house on that street is the best place in Japan to live...

-3 ( +0 / -3 )

I come from one of the more affluent partts of Sydney (often regarded as one of the most liveable cities in the world) - two minutes from the beach, swimming pools, you name it. I have also lived in three different prefectures here - including 5 years in Tokyo. Let me just say that you're crazy if you think living in a high rise in central Tokyo is the epitome of "good living". About as far from the concept as one could imagine.

1 ( +5 / -4 )

Kinda sad that most surveyed simply want to live near a supermarket & a train station!

Seems most Japanese are simply keen to survive/exist...................they don't seem very apt at LIVING!

The above survey is why the birth rate is droping most people live in places that aren't that hot for having & raising & BEING a family.

While some on this list are ok to me it seems Japanese need to work to figure out what living is really all about!

3 ( +6 / -3 )

Not a list I would agree with. Since coming to Japan we have lived in Tokyo/Nagano/Kobe City. Nagano was good but very hard living in the alps. Both my wife and I who comes from Nagano would rate Kobe City with its sea and mountains, beaches and country parks and Kyoto is about 1 hour, Osaka 40 minutes. Good place if you are a foreigner. Tokyo would be the bottom of our list.

8 ( +9 / -1 )

Don't know which line the writer used, but Enoshima to Shinjuku takes between 72 and 95 minutes with one or 2 changes, not less than 30 minutes as per the article. Hope the rest of the research is better...

3 ( +4 / -1 )

Hmm? We all have our fear of the big earthquake hitting. Where is a place in Japan that that chance it minimal? I would love to live there then.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Have to agree with Speed here: Matsuyama (where I live) is a GREAT place to live with a smalltown feel. I really feel like I know everyone here and there's ample things to do.. not so much for tourists, but plenty if you live here.

Niihama though... I went to Niihama on a Sunday and their shotengai is a ghost town... I think they had a small Aeon shop, but it was pretty bad. Friends here say a lot of the work there is drying up due to other ports being more convenient to reach honshu, etc. Granted I don't live there..so I can't really say.

Personally, if we're going with Ehime, I'd have put Ozu on the list. GREAT small town with lots of things to enjoy and plenty of shopping and "life" going on,

3 ( +3 / -0 )

Which is why a city like Nishinomiya rates so high, but wouldn't get a look in by me. Clean air, greenery & calm are essential.

Downtown Nishinomiya is ugly, it looks like a kid ran amok with a box of Lego (well, as do many cities in Japan). the only reason it gets such high ratings now is because of a huge and well-equipped shopping mall that opened a few years ago. It's pretty good, I know people in Osaka who go all the way to Nishinomiya just to shop there, but they wouldn't dream of moving there. By the way, the hillside areas of Nishinomiya and surrounding cities (Ashiya, Takarazuka) are really pleasant, green and spacious, but if you're looking for a convenient life, forget it. No shops, no hospitals, and you really have to drive everywhere.

Seems most Japanese are simply keen to survive/exist...................they don't seem very apt at LIVING!

Totally agree. People get so little value for the money they spend on housing, it's disgusting. Why would anyone be proud of getting hocked into life-long debt for the privilege of living in a two-up, two-down shoebox a twenty-minute bus ride from the nearest local station, and a further 45-minute train ride from the workplace? That's just crazy.

Both my wife and I who comes from Nagano would rate Kobe City with its sea and mountains, beaches and country parks and Kyoto is about 1 hour, Osaka 40 minutes.

Kobe is one of the most beautiful and liveable cities I can imagine, not only in Japan, but anywhere in the world. It also seems to be very foreigner friendly. However geographically it is crammed into a narrow space between the mountains and the sea, therefore making it highly prone to both tsunami and landslides. I would never feel safe if I lived there.

-3 ( +3 / -6 )

Tessa

highly prone to both tsunami and landslides. I would never feel safe if I lived there.

Kobe City because its on the Seto Sea there are no tsunami but if and when the Nankai earthquake happens the tsunami from that will reach Kobe and Osaka. Since the Tohoku tsunami the seawall and gates have been improved.

In the 12 years we have lived here there hasn't been a landslide, unlike when we lived in the alps.

"Highly Prone" is overuse?

4 ( +5 / -1 )

Ikoma's nice, but it's odd to describe it as a suburb of Nara, when it's really a suburb of Osaka.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

"Highly Prone" is overuse?

Yes. Apologies. But you have to admit that Kobe has a very dramatic geographical make-up, which is definitely part of its charm as a coastal city. And do you not fear a repeat of the Big One of '95?

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

Matsumoto City in central Nagano seems a nice place to live. A decent sized city with all the ameneties, but close to some gorgeous outdoors and with good transport links. In fact, I might move there......

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Ikoma's nice, but it's odd to describe it as a suburb of Nara, when it's really a suburb of Osaka.

Ikoma's full of rich people with huge houses, I don't think of it as either belonging to one place or the other. It just is what it is: a wealthy suburb.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Tessa

And do you not fear a repeat of the Big One of '95?

No which is why its another good place to live here. It won't happen again in my lifetime and probably yours too, but heck you can get knocked and killed just crossing the road in Tokyo?

From my rear windows are mountains and from the front the sea. In 20 minutes I'm deep in the mountains with great painting spots or 30 minutes I'm sitting on a beach eating lunch, all with very low transport costs. Like bus to station, train to beach ¥210 + ¥180=¥390

2 ( +3 / -1 )

From my rear windows are mountains and from the front the sea. In 20 minutes I'm deep in the mountains with great painting spots or 30 minutes I'm sitting on a beach eating lunch, all with very low transport costs. Like bus to station, train to beach ¥210 + ¥180=¥390.

Thanks. I've heard so many other good things about Kobe, but mainly about the food culture more than anything else. Today my friend who lives half in Tokyo and half in Kobe said that the bread in Kobe is better than anywhere in Japan. I love bread.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

I'll happily stay in Kakegawa (Shizuoka Ken). Nice weather year round, friendly people - neither too big nor too small. After twenty years here I can't imagine being happy anywhere else. Which is to say that everyone's tastes are different. This almost seems like such a personal matter or opinion that it couldn't realistically be made into a top ten list.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

After twenty years here I can't imagine being happy anywhere else.

I think that twenty years is long enough to know what makes you happy! Good for you!

0 ( +2 / -2 )

Tessa

the bread in Kobe is better than anywhere in Japan. I love bread.

We have a local bakery family been going for 50 years. Round stone ground wholewheat 8" dia, ¥400. After the big snow in the alps here in Kobe (our part) because of the mountains, zero snow. Food culture is good if you know where to go.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Naha is my choice.

Good size of city. Still relatively cheap to live in. Good food, good drink, wonderful nature and great people.

The only negative thing about Okinawa is that it's infested with military bases.

6 ( +10 / -5 )

Of the 10 cities in the list above, I'd choose Matsuyama and Hiroshima. In Matsuyama, there's a super sento near the JR station that I enjoy going to when I'm in the city. The Dogo Onsen sento is interesting, but too small and too expensive for me. Matsuyama is an interesting city to cycle around. Hiroshima is an interesting city with a nice public transportation system. Plus I enjoy eating fresh Hiroshima oysters ...

Recently passed through Fujisawa and found the train going into there and out too crowded for my liking when taking long trips (such as going to Tokyo from there ... ). Enoshima is nice, but it takes a lot of time and energy to get to and from there. Maybe it would be different living there ... but never experienced this, so don't know ...

Nishinomiya is in a nice area, but staying only in hotels when visiting the Kansai area, I prefer nearby Kobe and Osaka. Kobe has excellent food and Osaka has all kinds of exciting things and people in its favor.

But I find that home is the best of all ... which, for me, is downtown Tokyo. We have everything that is needed here ... plus I don't need an automobile as the public transportation system is great. And, at my age, Tokyo's hospital system must be the best in the world ...

3 ( +3 / -0 )

I just can't believe sensational Saitama didn't get a look-in!

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Aomori! Love the laid back feeling with impending changes as the Shinkansen line reaches this sleepy place.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

We have a local bakery family been going for 50 years. Round stone ground wholewheat 8" dia, ¥400.

yes, I've heard a lot of things about bread, pastry, confectionary shops in Kobe, something about the war and lots of POWs deciding to stay on in Kobe and set up some excellent bakeries. Germans, French and Russians. You might be very surprised if you go to other parts of Japan and discover a severe dearth of bread shops. i've heard many times that even people from Tokyo come to Kobe specifically for the bread!

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

Well, this is, after all, a survey of housewives. I was born and raised in Shinjuku, in the middle of Tokyo, and live there now. I love it (I did spend a year out of Shinjuku studying in the States). It is all a matter of taste and your lifestyle. Can't see living in a small town (like my hometown).

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Not that it is needed but my vote is also for Kobe. Big enough to have what you need but not too big like Tokyo which after a few years becomes oppressive. Mountains and the sea within walking distance. Great sense of style. Great food. It is the best city in Japan. Also has its own airport, which is losing money, but great for that quick flight to other locations in Japan.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Matsumoto not on list. My faith in lists shattered.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

I've lived in Japan most of my life and though Tokyo was a fun place to live and work years ago, I found it becoming stuffy and way too expensive. Over the years, I finally moved out to the suburbs of Yokohama where there are lush green parks, cleaner air, friendlier people, reasonably-priced shops and less rent to pay. I'm very surprised that Yokohama city was not one of the top three. I certainly have no complaints about my city here!****

2 ( +2 / -0 )

@falseflagsteve

Nishinomiya?

I guess that depends on WHERE in Nishinomiya and in what kind of lodging. Of course this was a very long time ago but I lived with a Japanese family there in a big Spanish style house, complete with a swimming pool. That was before I was married. After our marriage, we were asked to "take care" of another pretty big house (for two years) also in Nishinomiya - very near the trais station but we couldn't hear the trains ! On the other hand, Koshien stadium was just the other side of the rather large garden... When the owners came back from "gaikoku", we moved to Kobé and the last house I lived in down there was halfway up Rokko-san - with the most beautiful view, clean air and much cooler in summer than it was in "down town".Kobé.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

Hiroshima is right on - Inland Sea, mountains nearby, beautiful forests and rivers 30-60 minutes out, super friendly people etc etc. I would also vote for Onomichi back East towards Osaka from Hiroshima. Historic temple walks, great artistic community, super nice folks and Shiminami Kaido - what's not to like?

2 ( +2 / -0 )

NAHA ?, Not a Chance: How about Awase?, overlooking the Ocean, Maeda Point ? or ANYWHERE else on the Ocean / Overlooking the Ocean. If you LIVE in Naha, from the INSIDE, it's just ANOTHER Concrete jungle, depending how DEEP inside you are. Every time I read a "BertieWooster" comment, it all the more convinces me this is someone that was once in the military, transferred to Okinawa, screwed up, and got himself a "BCD"; Bad Conduct Discharge, or " Double D "; Dishonorable Discharge and will be forever "Disgrunteled" about his misfortune.

-1 ( +4 / -5 )

My ideal and favorite place to live in Japan would be in Fussa-shi, right in front of Tamagawa Josui river. It was lots of trees. It is nice and quite and still quite close and accesible to central Tokyo.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Kobe.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Glad to see a number of places in western Japan. Lived for a year outside of Matsuyama an it's a nice balance between big city and relaxed city by the inland sea.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

While Hiroshima is nice place to live, unfortunately that recent mudslide could alter that perception, despite the fact Hiroshima being a mandatory stop for all Shinkansen trains makes it really handy for travel to much of the rest of Japan.

I wonder why this survey didn't include cities in Saitama Prefecture that are close to JR East, Seibu and Tobu commuter rail lines.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Agree with above commenters about Nishinomiya. Nicer places further inland with more greenery but still convenient.

Kobe's nice as far as cities go, depending which part you live in. Remember being surprised getting off the shinkansen. (Where's the city...? Are those cable cars....?). I like the narrow coastal strip, you can get your bearings at a glance. And it was good exploring the inland area and mountains in-between.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Here is the full list http://aene.jp/hq_ranking/ My town, Yamaguchi, does not make it into the top 50. I live on a beach and cycle to work.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

By the way, the hillside areas of Nishinomiya and surrounding cities (Ashiya, Takarazuka) are really pleasant, green and spacious, but if you're looking for a convenient life, forget it. No shops, no hospitals, and you really have to drive everywhere.

Yeh, people in Nishinomiya are always commuting to outside there even just to bring their kids to kindergarten. Not enough facilities to match the amount of people moving in. But a lot of the people living there are "tenkinzoku", people that get shifted around by their companies. So to those people I think convenient shopping and transportation are important when looking for a place to live. Also knowing lots of other "tenkinzoku" are there probably attracts them.

Another thing is that it appears as a reasonable "in-between" to its neighbors Amagasaki and Ashiya. Amagasaki has a poor,dirty,dangerous reputation while Ashiya is seen as too expensive. So for many, Nishinomiya seems "just right".

1 ( +1 / -0 )

I stll think Roppongi rocks as a place to live. As long as you don't have to rent from a fudosan, lol.

-3 ( +1 / -4 )

I would have put Yokohama (Nakaku) and Kamakura on the list before most of these, but what do I know....

1 ( +1 / -0 )

This is a housewife list, don't forget. I prefer Kyoto, but most housewives are afraid of Kyoto natives.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Lived for a year in Tarumi ward, Kobe and I'd echo what other commenters have said, you can't beat good food and easy access to beach, mountain, shopping, and train!

3 ( +3 / -0 )

Another thing is that it appears as a reasonable "in-between" to its neighbors Amagasaki and Ashiya. Amagasaki has a poor,dirty,dangerous reputation while Ashiya is seen as too expensive. So for many, Nishinomiya seems "just right".

One of my students lived near a major river that is supposedly the dividing line between "nice Nishinomiya" and "awful Amagasaki." She told me in all seriousness that there were homeless men living on both sides of the riverbanks, and that the ones on the Nishinomiya side were far cleaner and better-mannered than the ones on the Amagasaki side ... I'm sorry to say that I laughed.

This is a housewife list, don't forget.

Ah, that explains a lot. Perhaps they could offer a list of "most convenient cities for commuters" or "most comfortable cities for non-Japanese." I'm sure the results would be vastly different.

-5 ( +0 / -5 )

Fujisawa? Are you crazy? The traffic sucks most of the time, and in the summer it's taken over by snobby surfer types who think they own the damn place.

If you've got to live in this area, try Hayama. The traffic's not nearly as bad and as the closest station is Zushi, you don't get all the clowns walking about.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

WA4TKG

From where we live in Naha, there are unspoiled beaches 10 minutes away and it still has the advantages of a city. Shopping, great places to eat/drink, movies, live music, easy to make friends.

By the way, I had a good laugh at what you thought my background was.

You couldn't be more wrong. I'm not even American!

And, as for my personality, generally speaking, I'm quite gruntled (or grunteled, if you prefer).

1 ( +1 / -0 )

I loved living in Kyoto.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

One of my students lived near a major river that is supposedly the dividing line between "nice Nishinomiya" and "awful Amagasaki." She told me in all seriousness that there were homeless men living on both sides of the riverbanks, and that the ones on the Nishinomiya side were far cleaner and better-mannered than the ones on the Amagasaki side ... I'm sorry to say that I laughed.

Lol, homeless are homeless to me. Can't believe anyone would actually look close enough to spot differences.

A lot of Nishinomiya wasn't nice, but they are just covering everything up with shopping complexes and other projects.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

therougou,

"Beauty is in the eye of the beholder."

This applies to homeless people on both sides of the river.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

One of my students lived near a major river that is supposedly the dividing line between "nice Nishinomiya" and "awful Amagasaki."

There's a student for every occasion.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Miyazaki City, here... Great place, far away from the trouble, noise and crime of the big cities. Slow down, take it easy...

0 ( +0 / -0 )

I have been living in Shizuoka City for a little over 3 years. This is one of the best cities I have ever been to in Japan. It is a smaller city, but the people are so friendly, the best green tea in Japan hands down, super fresh sashimi and sushi. The unagi is great here as well.

I can see mount Fuji clearly just outside my apartment and I see it everyday on my way to work. Also, the Shizuoka area is really rich in culture and history.

The weather is great for me because it never snows here and I'm from southern California. I like to call Shizuoka prefecture the "California of Japan" haha.

I highly recommend all of Shizuoka prefecture for people looking for an interesting part of Japan to live in or just travel around.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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