Photo: PR Times
lifestyle

Muslim women can rent 'wagara' hijabs to match kimonos in Kyoto

17 Comments
By Ben K, grape Japan

For many female tourists visiting Japan from abroad, renting a beautiful kimono for a photo shoot or to enjoy a leisurely stroll in a traditional Japanese neighborhood, a Japanese garden or perhaps on the grounds of a famous temple or shrine is a popular activity, and one which truly allows them to get a sense of experiencing the best of Japanese culture.

Kyoto is particularly rich with opportunities to rent kimonos, and rental shops catering to tourists continue to open around the city.

Catering to Muslim Tourists

Kimono rental shop Yumeyakata in Kyoto understood that Muslim women could enjoy the experience even more if their hijabs did not clash or stand out in contrast with the kimonos they were renting. Therefore, as a new item available in their shop, they have begun renting out specially made hijabs printed in wagara 和柄 (Japanese pattern) designs which perfectly match their kimonos.

Wagara Hijab Rentals

Yumeyakata already has a lineup of 20 wagara hijabs in patterns appropriate for the spring season such as sakura (cherry blossom) or yukiwa (snow ring), and expect to have an additional 50 designs and fabrics including lace for their summer lineup. Staff members are on hand to help customers coordinate their kimonos and wagara hijabs to their liking.

wahajib_3.jpg
Photo: PR Times

wahajib_2.jpg
Photo: PR Times

To commemorate the launch of this new initiative, Yumeyakata is renting their wagara hijabs for the special price of 300 yen (normally 500 yen).

Locations

Gojo Shop

wahajib_6.jpg
Photo: PR Times

wahajib_5.jpg
Photo: PR Times

Address: 128, Manjujicho, Shimogyo-ku, Kyoto-shi, Kyoto

  • Business Hours 10:00-19:30 (entry by 6pm)
  • Tel: 075-354-8515
  • Wesbite: Yumeyakata Gojo

Oike Bettei Shop

wahajib_4.jpg
Photo: PR Times

Address: 472-1 Kinpukicho, Nakagyo-ku, Kyoto 604-0846

Source:© PR Times, Inc / © Yumeyakata

Read more stories from grape Japan.

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-- Kyoto Just Always Looks Amazing. Gorgeous Photography Explores Japan’s Old Capital And More

© grape Japan

©2019 GPlusMedia Inc.

17 Comments
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It's too bad Muslim women can't take off their hijabs ever in order to wear a kimono properly and truly allow them to experience Japanese culture, let alone ever play in international beach volleyball tournaments wearing the required attire for that sport.

That being said, these wagara hijabs with the kimonos do look nice.

-4 ( +5 / -9 )

Why does Japanese culture need to accommodate foreign religions such as islam and allow muslim women to wear hijab when they want to “dress up” in kimono? This is not how you wear a kimono in Japan. Yes, it can be a nice experience for foreigners to dress up in kimono and feel like a geisha for one day, but if your religion doesn’t allow you to experience the japanese way of wearing a kimono the way it should be, then don’t do it. You sould respect the Japanese traditions when you are visiting Japan; not the other way around.

-3 ( +5 / -8 )

It's too bad Muslim women can't take off their hijabs ever in order to wear a kimono properly and truly allow them to experience Japanese culture

They can, and do. Not all Muslim women are forced to wear traditional and cultural attire that makes up the many different Muslim cultures around the globe.

let alone ever play in international beach volleyball tournaments wearing the required attire for that sport.

I was not aware Kyoto was remowned for that sport.

-1 ( +5 / -6 )

Why does Japanese culture need to accommodate foreign religions such as islam and allow muslim women to wear hijab when they want to “dress up” in kimono?

Because Japan is (despite our occasional gripes) an open-minded and welcoming country.

What do you suggest, physically removing the veil?

It's a lovely, positive and rewarding thing, this development. But oh, no - the fear that Japan will contaminated by our foreign ways has to crop up. Again.

1 ( +5 / -4 )

They can, and do. Not all Muslim women are forced to wear traditional and cultural attire

It’s very difficult to judge the level of pressure Muslim women face to cover up. In some places they can face appalling consequences from the law. In others, societal and familial pressures are at work. Those women who have fought against covering up are extraordinarily brave and true feminist heroes.

Not all people, including many Muslims, see garments like this and what they represent as lovely, positive and rewarding. While I would not agree with forcing people not to wear it, I’d be uncomfortable promoting a business which capitalized on it.

But when there is money to be made, people will make money. Good luck to them.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

Not all people, including many Muslims, see garments like this and what they represent as lovely, positive and rewarding.

Of course not. I know plenty who don't wear any traditional garb and plenty who do. I've even (gasp) enjoyed a drink with them in the pub after work etc.

Some women are forced to wear the gear and some aren't. Some where it as a form of identity and its not down to me to say whether they should or shouldn't wear it.

0 ( +3 / -3 )

I've even (gasp) enjoyed a drink with them in the pub after work etc.

No need for the condescending tone. I’m fully aware that some Muslims drink, thank you.

The issue of pressure is a huge one and it can’t be skirted that easily.

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

No need for the condescending tone. I’m fully aware that some Muslims drink, thank you.

Apologies, Jimizo. That was aimed more at those lurkers who see Muslims as a single entity, rather than yourself.

And yes, the issue of pressure is a huge one. No doubt about it. However, I think in relation to the topic, it's just Japan being accomodating to visitors and maybe a wee bit of commericial gain, too...

0 ( +4 / -4 )

On a business level this is good, but it is yet another example of how Islam is changing the world. Be very very careful

-3 ( +3 / -6 )

On a business level this is good, but it is yet another example of how Islam is changing the world. Be very very careful

I don’t think an increase in Muslims visiting Japan and people making money off them is a cause for alarm although the garment in this article is problematic .

0 ( +3 / -3 )

It's a sales tactic, obviously. Islamic people don't really drink so they have a lot of extra disposable income -- and these extra bills are perfect way for a temple to seek to improve their revenue streams. The temples may have a lot fo fabric left over from when more people actually walked around in Kimonos, so why not repurpose the fabric and line your pockets with currency, instead of lining your pockets with old fabric?

Hopefully when I go a temple sober I will be able to buy a cowboy hat made out of kimono cloth and use it as a giant, foldable whiskey goblet.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

However, I think in relation to the topic, it's just Japan being accomodating to visitors and maybe a wee bit of commericial gain, too...

Just like Toasted Heretic said, it's tourism. No big deal. Japan isn't about to accept Sharia law just because they have some pretty hijabs for rent to tourists.

2 ( +4 / -2 )

I can't understand why people are getting into a froth about this.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

Japanese are very client oriented and how to make money from tourists. Not a bad thing since they have ideas.

Why not for Muslims if need be ?

Then learn that for tens of millions, this kind of clothing is like a prison over your head for women. Harassed if not wearing it.

But it is also as said by Toasted for many just a cultural habit.

About the experiencing the japanese clothing...then do it the japanese way. I laughed well about comparison with cowboy hat above comment.

Nice to share culture and culture shall get over religion.

Japanese see culturally that way with such nihon hijab renting.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

What's their stance on Burkas, I wonder?

I see those items worn quite a bit by female tourists in Bangkok and other SE Asian spots. Veils, too.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

I can't understand why people are getting into a froth about this.

Oh, I can.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

Oh, I can

Well, please explain.

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

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