lifestyle

Self-defense tip: Dealing with unwanted 'kabe-don'

12 Comments
By Jessica Kozuka

With the aggressive pick-up tactics of Julien “the most hated man in the world” Blanc all over the news this month, it only makes sense that we here at RocketNews24 do our part in educating readers about self-defense. And being as this is Japan, we thought we should start with a method for dealing with that particularly Japanese act of violence-infused wooing: the "kabe-don."

If you are encountering this term for the first time, "kabe-don" means pinning someone up against a wall so that they cannot escape, a common pose in manga when a, typically male, character wants to converse intimately with the object of his affection. The term comes from the word for wall ("kabe") and the sound made when you hit a hard object ("don").

For some reason, this particular pose fires up the Japanese imagination, so much so that there’s even a cafe you can visit to experience a romantic "kabe-don" for yourself.

But what if you are on the receiving end of an unwanted "kabe-don?" What’s the best way to fend off your domineering opponent? We’ve covered a few options before, from a quick upper cut to a jab to the solar plexus. These moves largely assume the "kabe-don-ee" is shorter in stature than the "kabe-don-er."

This week, we’ve discovered a move that bypasses the height element and also adds an element of slapstick, comeuppance humor to the equation. See illustration at left.

So if you are pushed against a wall and your opponent has a firm grip on you, just take the weight off your feet and slide down the wall, causing the kabe-don-er to whack his noggin against it. Then for good measure, punch him in the nuts and make your escape.

Et voila! Unwanted sexual aggression gets its just reward.

Source/image: Kinisoku

Read more stories from RocketNews24. -- Always wanted to try a romantic Kabe-don? There’s now a cafe for it! -- Kabe-don: How tough guys show their love! -- Spotted: Totally yabai kabe-don in Shinjuku Station

© RocketNews24

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12 Comments
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Funny

0 ( +0 / -0 )

That is some advanced foreplay there, I have to say.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

They left out step 5 - "Get arrested by the police". Japan doesn't really have a self-defence clause in its criminal law, so even if someone is beating you around the head with a baseball bat you're supposed to either run away (good luck with that) or just lie there until the police arrive.

... stupid? Undoubtedly. The law? Unfortunately. A stupid law? Every country's got their own share of 'em.

You'd probably get away with it if he hit his own head against the wall, but the groin punch the picture advises is clearly an assault, and should be avoided.

The answer to these sort of situations is pretty simple. Hold up your cellphone with 110 showing on the screen and hit the call button. The phone is now ringing and they have literally a couple of seconds before the police operator answers. If they back away immediately then cancel the call. If they don't then tell the police that some guy assaulted you and you'd like them to please come.

If the guy is smart he'll get the message the second he sees 110 and back away. If he doesn't get the message or tries to smack the phone out of your hand... well, then you can move to last resort positions. But he can't claim its a misunderstanding or anything later... especially when the police have an emergency call logged from your phone.

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

just take the weight off your feet and slide down the wall...

...and possibly get a knee in the face?? By the looks of the illustration to the left, that's what the next move would be.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Frungy

Get yourself a Ropozensho and read it before pulling something out from your ears.

Article 36 of the criminal law in Japan is about self defense and how it shields you from any prosecution in protecting yourself from an assailant.

0 ( +3 / -3 )

I shouldn't laugh at this really, but the "punch him in the nuts" part cracked me up. That's generally how you should deal with a sleazebag hitting on women this way. Seriously, what's so romantic about pinning a girl against the wall? If I saw this happening, I'd have to intervene. Either with a slapstick Atomic Wedgie, or a much more serious arm twist and "Vulcan Grip". There are three things that make my blood boil: Cruelty to animals, child abuse, and raising your hand to a woman. Do any of these things when I'm around, and I can't be held responsible when the red mist descends.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

SamuraiBlueNov. 24, 2014 - 12:15PM JST Article 36 of the criminal law in Japan is about self defense and how it shields you from any prosecution in protecting yourself from an assailant.

It seems you haven't read the article you claim to know so much about.

Article 36 states: "(1) An act unavoidably performed to protect the rights of oneself or any other person against imminent and unlawful infringement is not punishable."

Note that word "unavoidably"? That's what makes self-defense in Japan illegal. Could you run? Then self-defense is illegal. Should you have anticipated the violence and left earlier? Then self-defense is illegal. Could you have just taken a punch or two while waiting for the police to arrive? Then self-defense is illegal.

And part 2 just adds to the impossibility of self-defense: "(2) An act exceeding the limits of self-defense may lead to the punishment being reduced or may exculpate the offender in light of the circumstances."

Here "self-defense" is interpreted strictly as defensive actions that incidentally or accidentally cause injury. So if you block and the guy bruises himself you're covered. If you punch him in the nuts that's not covered. And judges in the past have been extremely strict about part 2.

Want proof? Just look at the recent case of the guy trying to escape from a road rager who was trying to break into his car. The road rager got his hand stuck in the door and was dragged along and died. In most countries this would be regarded as a regrettable accident in the course of taking appropriate self-defensive action. In Japan the guy was arrested for murder.

In all practical terms Japanese law has no self-defence clause as we would understand the term. The clause doesn't even necessarily cover you if you turn and run and the guy grabbing you falls down and breaks his neck.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

Frungy

Could you run? Then self-defense is illegal. Should you have anticipated the violence and left earlier? Then self-defense is illegal. Could you have just taken a punch or two while waiting for the police to arrive? Then self-defense is illegal.

They are all acts of self defense and are consdered permissible in a court of law. In a courtroom the prosecutor would need to first establish motive of not running or ignoring aticipated violence or arrival of police. You can argue all you want with your infatuated crazy scenario but at the end self defense whether in the US or Japan is not about taking revenge or over reacting which is what Kajo boei is.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

SamuraiBlueNov. 24, 2014 - 03:15PM JST They are all acts of self defense and are consdered permissible in a court of law.

So you agree with me that your options in Japan are running away, leaving before the trouble starts or becoming a human punching bag until the police arrive. Excellent. What's your problem then?

In a courtroom the prosecutor would need to first establish motive of not running or ignoring aticipated violence or arrival of police.

No, they wouldn't. Clearly you do not understand Japanese law or how Japanese courtrooms work. The prosecutor doesn't have to establish a single thing except that the charge was laid. The defense lawyer has to argue that your self-defensive action was "unavoidable". All the prosecutor has to do then is say, "It was not unavoidable", and then the judge (who works closely with the prosecutor and has a vested interest in not making their working relationship difficult) will rule in the prosecutor's favor 90%+ of the time.

You can argue all you want with your infatuated crazy scenario but at the end self defense whether in the US or Japan is not about taking revenge or over reacting which is what Kajo boei is.

The road rage scenario is a real news item reported on Japan Today just a few weeks back.

And it seems that we both agree that the steps taken in the article are excessive.

Where you step over the line is comparing US self-defense law with Japanese self-defense law. Firstly there is no "US" self-defense law, it varies dramatically from state to state in both wording and interpretation, and secondly it is NOTHING like Japanese self-defense law. In some states in the US someone can step onto your lawn and you can blow them away and claim they were invading your property and you acted in self-defense. Try that in Japan and you'll be facing a short sharp drop.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Note that word "unavoidably"? That's what makes self-defense in Japan illegal. Could you run? Then self-defense is illegal. Should you have anticipated the violence and left earlier? Then self-defense is illegal. Could you have just taken a punch or two while waiting for the police to arrive? Then self-defense is illegal.

Ah, but if you have to take a punch or two, then your rights are definitely violated, so you definitely don't have to do that.

As for "you should leave if you can anticipate the violence" or "you should run if you can", they are hardly uncommon doctrines. The duty to retreat is common enough, even in the United States, that those States that have laws like the ones you want are specifically called "Stand your Ground" laws.

Further, while the letter of the text does seem to imply necessity, it seems that modern legal opinion in Japan values Proportionality (相当性) rather than Necessity (必要性). In fact, the reduced emphasis on Necessity is one way to separate it from the article next to it #37 - Necessity (緊急避難).

A nice explanation of it is actually in Japanese Wikipedia.

Want proof? Just look at the recent case of the guy trying to escape from a road rager who was trying to break into his car. The road rager got his hand stuck in the door and was dragged along and died. In most countries this would be regarded as a regrettable accident in the course of taking appropriate self-defensive action. In Japan the guy was arrested for murder.

First, there is no "murder" charge in Japan's criminal code. Nor is their manslaughter. There is a catchall called homicide (殺人). Considering that the road rager did die due to active measures being undertaken by the car driver, the description is not inaccurate.

No, they wouldn't. Clearly you do not understand Japanese law or how Japanese courtrooms work. The prosecutor doesn't have to establish a single thing except that the charge was laid. The defense lawyer has to argue that your self-defensive action was "unavoidable". All the prosecutor has to do then is say, "It was not unavoidable", and then the judge (who works closely with the prosecutor and has a vested interest in not making their working relationship difficult) will rule in the prosecutor's favor 90%+ of the time.

Whether the judge would unfairly side with the prosecutor aside, there is nothing procedurally wrong with this.

Self-defense is what is typically called an affirmative defense. In short, to use it at all, you have to agree that you killed / hurt the guy. So it isn't like the prosecutor has to establish the charge was laid. You will, in your defense. Then, yes, since it is an affirmative defense, then your defense lawyer will indeed have to argue how your defensive action meets with the legal requirements for self-defense, and that takes into account not only the letter of the law, but also suitable precedents.

And of course, if the prosecutor's interested, he'd have to suggest how it is not-unavoidable.

In some states in the US someone can step onto your lawn and you can blow them away and claim they were invading your property and you acted in self-defense. Try that in Japan and you'll be facing a short sharp drop.

As you said ... some. Not all.

What is, however, probably universal to US laws is that they are a lot longer and spell things out in the law. This is partially because the US uses jury trials, and for better or worse they need much more explicit guidance (it is also why homicide gets split into murder of 1st, 2nd degrees and then manslaughter).

2 ( +3 / -1 )

Frungy, I think you need to come with something better than a road rage incident in which someone died. Dragging someone along the street until they die is excessive. Kicking someone in the nuts if you are in imminent danger is a very different matter.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

is there really such a thing as unwanted kabedon?

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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