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Survey ranks Tokyo as the most desirable place in Japan to live, bumping Kanagawa to #2

23 Comments
By Dale Roll, SoraNews24

Japan has 47 prefectures stretched out between its five main islands, and each one is great to live in for its own reasons. In terms of which is the best, data indicated that it’s Fukui Prefecture, though resident surveys reported otherwise. People who currently live in Hokkaido love living there and are happy to stay…but is it appealing to people who live in other prefectures? What about you? If you could move to any prefecture in Japan, where would you choose to go?

A survey by Brand Research Institute Inc revealed where in the country Japanese people most would like to live. It asked 31,369 people the question, “Would you want to live in ___ Prefecture?” for each prefecture, and the participants were given five response options: “I really want to live there,” “I’d like to live there”, “I wouldn’t mind living there”, “I don’t feel one way or another about living there”, and “I don’t really want to live there”. Each answer was worth a specific amount of points (100 for the first, then 50, then 25, and 0 for the last two). The weighted average of all the responses for each prefecture determined its position in the ranking.

Unsurprisingly, Tokyo turned out to be the most desirable place to live. It beat out its neighbor Kanagawa Prefecture, which was last year’s most popular prefecture. In total, 49.2 percent of the respondents had some desire to live in Tokyo, which earned the city an average score of 26.3. Kanagawa, which was bumped down to second place, earned 22.0 points. Though a slightly higher percentage of respondents expressed at least some desire to move there (49.7 percent), only 9.2 percent expressed strong desire by answering “I really want to live there”, while 14.1 percent of respondents expressed strong desire to move to Tokyo.

In third place was Hokkaido, which moved up from fourth place, followed by Osaka, moving up from fifth, and Kyoto, which dropped down from third. Though their rankings have moved around a bit, the top five prefectures remain the same as last year. The top 10 prefectures were as follows:

  1. Tokyo (26.3 points)

  2. Kanagawa (22.0 points)

  3. Hokkaido (19.5 points)

  4. Osaka (18.3 points)

  5. Kyoto (17.5 points)

  6. Fukuoka (16.6 points)

  7. Hyogo (15.2 points)

  8. Okinawa (14.9 points)

  9. Chiba (13.5 points)

  10. Aichi (12.2 points)

The participants were also asked questions that determined their impression of each of the prefectures based on 84 factors, including the quality of its medical care, strength of its athletic programs, and environmental friendliness of its cities. As it turned out, the factors that seemed most important to respondents ended up being the beauty and style of the prefecture as well as the quality of education and child care.

Among the prefectures ranked according to the appeal of their cities and land, Tokyo came in at number one, with Kanagawa second; Hyogo, which neighbors Osaka, third, followed by Kyoto, and then Fukuoka. For child-rearing and education, Saitama Prefecture, bordering the north of Tokyo, took the first spot; followed by Tokyo, Kanagawa, Hyogo and Akita.

The results of the questionnaire seemed to indicate that a person’s impression of a prefecture’s education and child-rearing opportunities, as well as its beauty, were the most determining factors of the prefecture’s desirability. Brand Research Institute hopes that this information will help local governments improve the appeal of their prefecture and cities, to bring in more residents from out-of-prefecture.

In the end, data-praised Fukui Prefecture didn’t even make the top 10, but we’re not surprised that Tokyo ranked so highly. Given that it’s a huge city with lots of amazing architecture and beautiful views, as well as plenty of opportunities for child care and education, it was bound to be a highly desirable place to live. But we’re also not surprised that Hokkaido made it to number three, considering they’ve got the best local cuisine in the country.

Source: Nico Nico News via My Game News Flash

Read more stories from SoraNews24.

-- Why are people in their 20s moving outside of Tokyo to Yokohama and other areas?

-- Five of the worst areas to live in and around Tokyo

-- What’s the best part of Tokyo to live in, and why? Survey gives the top six picks

© SoraNews24

©2020 GPlusMedia Inc.

23 Comments
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So...like everywhere else in Japan?

Everywhere in Japan is like Tokyo? I think not.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

You can go anywhere in the city, into any neighborhood and find cool little shops, good food, and people to chat with. 

So...like everywhere else in Japan?

0 ( +0 / -0 )

I love living in Tokyo but to me it became a much more enjoyable place to live when I swapped the train for a bicycle for my daily commute. I really hadn't realised how much that 20 minute train ride had stressed me out. Everything's great now.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

as well as plenty of opportunities for child care and education

Child Care,

Is it April fool or what?

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Tokyo has too many American gaijin now, who are generally loud, rude and disrespectful. Too many baka Instagrammers.

That feeling goes both ways.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

Let me guess, Ota City, Gunma was last place?

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Man I wish you could fix typos after posting on this site. Or maybe I should just try reading my posts before uploading...

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Pointless survey in my opinion. different people like different things for different reasons. Even different times of an individuals life they may find certain things more appealing to them. There is no universal "best". The idea that areas that ran lower should learn something from those that rand higher is ludicrous.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Maybe data from before COVID

Kochi has highest number of beds per capita.

Otherwise, after all this is over, somewhere to go for a walk - beach, forest, un-concreted river, or all three

2 ( +2 / -0 )

My first 3 years in Tokyo we’re miserable. I hated the lack of green space and all the people. After 22 years, I have become accustomed to it and have grown to appreciate the safety and the reliable trains.

If i had my choice, I’d move back to Fukuoka where I lived from 90-93. That’s a great city and I loved living there, with the exception of the gigantic cockroach’s.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

This is gotta be a joke. Tokyo desirable? When I get on the trains at 7:30 am, most of the people look like they got the life sucked out of them, and that’s desirable? People usually look surprised when I approach them for help regarding the train map. Osaka is more desirable, and so is Fukuoka, and lots of other places.

6 ( +6 / -0 )

Tokyo will always have it's defenders it is "the place where you succeed in Japan" for many wannabees. However if you take out the "prestige" and "outlook" from the equation, Kansai is much more praised for it's people food mindset and culture.

Definitely "smaller" cities provide a more authentic experience, especially in Japan.

6 ( +6 / -0 )

In Tokyo cheap rents are inversely proportional to miserable commutes. Pick your poison.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

In Tatsuno I rent a 6DK house with surround garden for less monthly rental than a 1 room apartment in Tokyo.

Tokyo is actually reasonable compared with other megacities if you choose the right area. I lived in a nice-ish area of Tokyo and was paying over ¥200,000 per month for a modest 2LDK. In the less fashionable wards like Adachi and Arakawa ( about 30 mins or less from central Tokyo ) the rents are much cheaper. I have a friend living out in western Tokyo with reasonable rents and lovely views. In the satellite towns around Tokyo, the rents are cheaper still.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

I cannot recall any amazing architecture at all or beautiful views. Most buildings are big rectangular boxes

I’d agree with that. Tokyo isn’t exactly pleasing on the eye but neither are any Japanese cities in my experience ( Kyoto is as dull as any with more temples than most dotted around ).

As you said, in a country hammered by earthquakes, functionality and safety tend to take precedence over flamboyance. It’s understandable.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

In Tatsuno I rent a 6DK house with surround garden for less monthly rental than a 1 room apartment in Tokyo.

5 ( +6 / -1 )

Everything is in Tokyo, but the crowds and rental prices are really off-putting.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Given that it’s a huge city with lots of amazing architecture and beautiful views, as well as plenty of opportunities for child care and education, it was bound to be a highly desirable place to live.

Is this fake news? I guess if you were born wealthy and don't need to ride the trains it is an average megacity. I cannot recall any amazing architecture at all or beautiful views. Most buildings are big rectangular boxes built to withstand the massive earthquake that will come and knock Tokyo down to a third rate city.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

I think the real estate market will be loosening up some, so it should be cheaper to find a place in the next few months.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

I love Tokyo. It's my favorite city on this planet, much less Japan. You can go anywhere in the city, into any neighborhood and find cool little shops, good food, and people to chat with. I like the cramped style of it all.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

Tokyo is a great place. So much to see and do. I’ve lived in and around it for 20 years and I’m still finding hidden gems. I remember one new employee from Akita told me there is more going on at one station on the Yamanote Line than in his home town.

No other Japanese city, and there are some good ones, comes close for me.

Wouldn’t live anywhere else in Japan.

2 ( +4 / -2 )

Tokyo isn't on my list. Lived there for only six months nearly 30 years ago. Moved to the Japan Alps, wife's birth place. Great place. Then to Kobe City another really nice place to live. From there to the beach area of Tatsuno.

I can't even remember the last visit I made to Tokyo but certainly more than 15 years. Wife goes sometimes to visit family.

There are so many beautiful places to live without the cramped trains and streets.

7 ( +8 / -1 )

Such a predictable list.

Aside from Hokkaido & Okinawa - outstanding nature, lifestyle etc and Kyoto - historical beauty, culture - all are the major metropolis / megalopolis zones of Japan. No doubt most of the respondents live there. In fact 25% of all Japan lives in the Greater Tokyo Zone.

Of course such giant centers can offer much more than regional areas in the fields of education, health/medical, transport, employment, culture, entertainment etc etc. A no-brainer.

This survey simply reinforces the fact that Japan and the world, are being urbanized at unprecedented rates and people find "comfort" in living in close quarters with millions upon millions of people.

I imagine such people could never see the desirability of lovely smaller cities like Toyama, Kagoshima, Takamatsu, Shizuoka, Aomori, Niigata, Matsue etc, let alone I dare guess regional towns.

Govts & Industry, by encouraging centralization of the populace, are imo doing a disservice to the country.

One giant earthquake, one pandemic, one major calamity in Tokyo will bring pain to the whole nation.

I've got no desire to live in such places.

4 ( +5 / -1 )

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