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Image: PR Times
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The top 10 most appealing of Tokyo’s 23 wards to live in after retirement

22 Comments
By Krista Rogers, SoraNews24

Tokyo’s 23 special wards, known as ku (区) in Japanese, function more or less on an equivalent level to a municipality. They make up the entire eastern part of Tokyo Prefecture and form the “heart” of the city, while the western part of the prefecture is composed of other municipalities, including Mitaka (home of the popular Ghibli Museum), Kokubunji, and Hachioji.

Generally speaking, a select few of the 23 special wards, such as Chuo Ward, Sumida Ward, and Shinjuku Ward, house the most famous visitor attractions in the entire city. They can also be popular neighborhoods for the younger generations to live in, as evidenced by surveys of young people who picked the top places they’d want to live in the Tokyo area.

Conversely, where would the older generations prefer to settle down within the 23 special wards? Japanese trends research site Nexer, in collaboration with housing management company Tochi Katsuyo, asked 500 men and women in their 60s and younger who have lived in Tokyo for their thoughts via an online survey. Let’s see which 10 wards rated the highest in their minds.

▼ The top ten results

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The Top Ten Most Appealing Tokyo Special Wards to Live in Post-Retirement

9 [tie]. Meguro Ward (目黒区)

9 [tie]. Kita Ward (北区)

  1. Bunkyo Ward (文京区)

  2. Katsushika Ward (葛飾区)

  3. Minato Ward (港区)

  4. Nakano Ward (中野区)

  5. Edogawa Ward (江戸川区)

  6. Nerima Ward (練馬区)

Coming in at third place is Nerima Ward, the most northwestern of Tokyo’s 23 special wards. Common reasons why survey takers identified this as a great place to live when older is an abundance of greenery, due to its many parks, as well as plenty of convenient transportation options (one person cited how easy it is to reach Ikebukuro, a major Tokyo district, via just one train line). Interestingly, many respondents also noted Nerima as being the special ward safest in the event of a natural disaster such as a big earthquake. We’d also like to humbly add that older folks can find some Showa era (1926-1989) pudding perfection as well as prolific manga creator Rumiko Takahashi‘s abode and inspiration for many of her works in Nerima. If that all doesn’t sound like a sweet deal, then we don’t know what is.

▼ Retired couples with magical tendencies can also enjoy regular dates at the newly opened Warner Brothers Studio Tokyo Making of Harry Potter walk-through museum

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Image: SoraNews24

2. Suginami Ward (杉並区)

Second place goes to Suginami Ward, which is interestingly located right below Nerima Ward. Survey takers noted its relaxed atmosphere, with one respondent calling it the perfect balance of city and residential areas with large supermarkets and hospitals. They also pointed to the quality of public facilities and social services provided by the ward to care for elderly residents versus those of the other wards. Therefore, having all of these resources to support a fulfilling senior lifestyle made it an easy choice for many survey takers. Plus, who wouldn’t want to be entertained close to home at the famous Koenji Awaodori festival every summer in Suginami’s Koenji neighborhood?

▼ For a free and interesting attraction in Suginami Ward, our reporter recommends stopping by the Za-Koenji Public Theatre with the cool stairs.

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Image: SoraNews24

1. Setagaya Ward (世田谷区)

Finally, just to the south of second-place Suginami Ward is overall winner Setagaya Ward. This most populous of all special wards was the most appealing choice for a place to enjoy retirement because it gives the impression of a high-end yet unpretentious neighborhood. In fact, many Japanese celebrities are known to reside in affluent areas of the ward. Despite the quieter local vibe, transportation via the Keio Line and more provides easy access to the center of the city. Retirees may also delight in riding the retro Setagaya Tram Line, one of the last of its kind in the Tokyo area. To quote the words of one survey taker, Setagaya Ward feels like an “elegant shitamachi [traditional downtown areas of Edo, Tokyo’s name prior to 1868].”

▼ Bonus reason: Setagaya is also home to Gotokuji, the temple overflowing with lucky cat figures.

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Image: SoraNews24

In summary, the top three special wards of Tokyo where Japanese people would like to live after retiring are all adjoining and form the westernmost border of all special wards. Important selection factors noted by survey takers are that these places offer ample green spaces, public facilities, and a peaceful atmosphere for a relaxed peace of mind.

Source: PR Times

Read more stories from SoraNews24.

-- Top 10 areas in Japan’s capital region where women who live on their own want to live

-- Did you know Tokyoites get discounts on certain hotels? We list them up

-- Roughly one in eight of Tokyo’s new adults is foreign-born, study shows

© SoraNews24

©2024 GPlusMedia Inc.

22 Comments
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No thanks, I reside in Osaka, bleeding cheap, the kitchen of Japan , cheaper housing and the people act like humans not robots and do a thing called small talk and even chat to strangers.

-11 ( +4 / -15 )

How can there be two number ones. I am very confused by this ranking system.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

Over the years I have lived in Nakano, Nerima and spent a considerable time in Suginami and I rate them all. Where I live now (Musashino) is pretty sweet, it is compact , connected by the Chuo line and has plenty of hospitals etc

even chat to strangers.

You should never talk to strangers.

No thanks, I reside in Osaka, bleeding cheap, the kitchen of Japan

I personally never liked Osaka. Been a few times and though nothing if it. People seemed very proud of their down to earthness which seemed a bit false. As for the food well if all you want is flour and water then it's the place to be. Bleeding cheap indeed.

9 ( +12 / -3 )

Osaka has a more fun, casual down-to-earth attitude, but Tokyo has so much more to do.

1 ( +6 / -5 )

How can there be two number ones. I am very confused by this ranking system.

There is this thing called a 'tie', where two things get the same score, and therefore neither is above the other.

3 ( +7 / -4 )

Elvis

What a ridiculous thing to say, lol

Its known as the kitchen of Japan, not by me BTW, you see

youre free to enjoy you’re life where you life and I’m pleased for you, but I’ve been to Tokyo around 30 times and it’s not my cup of tea. Too busy and the price of everything, can you believe it.

I’m renting a nice 3 bedroomed apartment in the centre of Osaka, 1 minute walk from Midosuji line and less than 7 minutes from Kintetsu, JR and 'Hanshin lines. 110,000 yen a month. Not getting that in the center of Tokyo that’s for sure, lol

-12 ( +3 / -15 )

Polls like this are quality clickbait.

The Japanese is "sumiyasu-sou to omoimasu", so they are ranking "where might be nice to live, in your imagination". It would be more work, but more sensible to ask people in each ku "are you satisfied living in your ku". At least that would be based on experience. The question as it stands it like asking me which of two cars I've never driven, say the Bugatti Veyron and the La Ferrari, has better handling.

2 ( +4 / -2 )

I live in Tokyo. 3 bedroom apartment for 110,000 a month. 3 minute walk to the station. Pretty good deal and I can get anywhere in central Tokyo in less than 30 minutes. Other than rent, I’m not sure Osaka is any cheaper and salaries are also lower than Tokyo.

6 ( +7 / -1 )

Tokyo is cool.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

Osaka, bleeding cheap, the kitchen of Japan , cheaper housing and the people act like humans not robots and do a thing called small talk and even chat to strangers.

I've lived in both Osaka and Tokyo for many years and this quote above is parroted ad nauseaum, but unfortunately it isn't true.

Osaka, at one time in the distant past, might have been friendlier, but this hasn't been the case in decades. Personally, I find Tokyoites friendlier and more willing to talk. Osaka a lot cheaper? Not by much.

3 ( +5 / -2 )

The secret of Setagaya is the section of the Meguro river in Setagaya ward that’s not in Meguro-ward. There are carp, many kinds of small fish, crawfish, herons, ducks, raccoons. It is a fine garden.

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

one person cited how easy it is to reach Ikebukuro

That's supposed to be a good thing!?!

I live in Suginami-ku and often see local retirees looking happy and prosperous.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

I live in Setagaya and there's no surprise to see it top the list. It's a fantastic place.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

We decided to move out of Tokyo after my retirement and moved to Okayama/Kurashiki between Osaka and Hiroshima 5 years ago. Best decision we ever made. What a big difference, plenty of greenery around, river and forest, very clean air and water, buying our home was 4 times cheaper than in Tokyo, far less people and traffic, half price for city-bus fare for all elderly Okayama citizens and everything you need for your daily needs is available here, same as in Tokyo.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

Yohan

We decided to move out of Tokyo after my retirement and moved to Okayama/Kurashiki between Osaka and Hiroshima 5 years ago. Best decision we ever made. What a big difference, plenty of greenery around, river and forest, very clean air and water, buying our home was 4 times cheaper than in Tokyo, far less people and traffic, half price for city-bus fare for all elderly Okayama citizens and everything you need for your daily needs is available here, same as in Tokyo.

We made a similar decision four years ago and moved to the coast on the Harma-nada Sea.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

If you can afford to buy in, the central Tokyo is the best place to retire in. As you age you need more convenient access to shopping, medical facilities and entertainment. Tokyo not only has more of these than anywhere else but also has the public transport system to give you ready access. Who needs a car? (Who needs more elderly drivers?)

4 ( +4 / -0 )

Nagoyajin

If you can afford to buy in, the central Tokyo is the best place to retire in. As you age you need more convenient access to shopping, medical facilities and entertainment. Tokyo not only has more of these than anywhere else but also has the public transport system to give you ready access. Who needs a car? (Who needs more elderly drivers?)

I have all that in our seaside location which is part of a city. Community buses, community taxis, JR station. Shopping 5-minute walk. Major hospital 5-minute walk. Many clinics. Wide open streets with houses and gardens. Farming fields. I won't swap it for Tokyo.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

gaijinland

erm, excuse me, but I can walk to the center in ten minutes actually. So that’s significantly different. In Osaka you can kind far cheaper stuff especially in eateries, oh yeah. I know that for a fact and I’ve been in Japan for over two decades and travelled extensively, you see.

wallace

Glad you are happy in your location, but not for me, I love the hustle and bustle of city life.

Maybe it’s because I’m a Londoner.

-6 ( +0 / -6 )

Neither Tokyo nor Osaka for me, thanks. Big cities are for people who have no choice but to be there for work.

Out here in the sticks I have greenery, open spaces, a garden and an allotment, and a community of mostly likeminded people who are friendly, social and helpful.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

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