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Tourism board wants foreign visitors to avoid 'public flatulence'

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Tourism board wants foreign visitors to avoid 'public flatulence' ...

If so, then foreigners should avoid mixing with the locals.

17 ( +20 / -3 )

“Japanese etiquette is based on avoiding causing discomfort or nuisance to others,” the guide points out. “Accordingly, Japanese will avoid bodily functions such as belching or flatulence in public entirely, or perform bodily functions as discreetly as possible.”

Go tell that to the hordes of nose picking, snot swallowing, manga porn reading salarymen who take the Tokyo metro in the morning.

41 ( +46 / -5 )

Accordingly, Japanese will avoid bodily functions such as belching or flatulence in public entirely, or perform bodily functions as discreetly as possible.

Oh, puh-leeze, you have got to be kidding me!

Yesterday on the train I sat across from a man who had his finger up his nose the whole time (I'm absolutely certain he was Japanese, he was reading a Japanese book) and would occasionally pause to inspect the results of his "mining" expeditions by holding his finger up in the air, before placing in his mouth.

A few days ago a granny and her grandchildren on the train drove me crazy by making that "hoik" sound (you know, when they suck up the snot in one dramatic motion with as much noise as possible) every few seconds.

Recently, I'm seeing more bag ladies and homeless men on the train or in the library who literally stink the place out.

And don't get me started on the pavement pizzas, which I find myself having to step over on a daily basis. If you're going to vomit, at least find one of those famous and superior Japanese toilets first.

25 ( +30 / -5 )

Japanese etiquette is based on avoiding causing discomfort or nuisance to others,

Except when it comes to smoking. Then they don't give a rip.

27 ( +28 / -1 )

I once attended a lecture in Japan by a Japanese academic who said with a straight face that while Japanese were prone to belch in public gaijin were more prone to pass gas.

11 ( +14 / -3 )

Having watched more than a few porn movies where the fetish is largely concerned with the anus; it is certainly possible that the Japanese (on average?) have superior cleanliness in this area....

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

Someone needs to send a message to the idiots that came up with this idea. Probably some teeth-sucking, nose-picking, sweat-smelly, farting, noodle sucking oyaji!

This is beyond ridiculous!

15 ( +19 / -4 )

Haha, yeah, right, then why am I, the foreigner, the only one shocked when my local government coworkers belch at every nomikai I ever had to attend in my job.

8 ( +9 / -1 )

One of the side-effects of eating natto. Makes me wonder how I was able to get my permanent residence...

2 ( +4 / -2 )

I wonder if this advisory gave any guidance on sneezing in public.

Going by the local custom, it seems the civilised Japanese way is to turn your head slightly to one side and shout your sneeze as loudly as you can, letting fly a vast cloud of mist and mucus, regardless of whether you're on a crowded train or in an office full of colleagues you respect too much to blow your nose in front of.

And nose-picking seems to be de rigeur on the Joban line.

16 ( +17 / -1 )

I once attended a lecture in Japan by a Japanese academic who said with a straight face that while Japanese were prone to belch in public gaijin were more prone to pass gas.

There's an IgNobel in there for someone.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

Going by the local custom, it seems the civilised Japanese way is to turn your head slightly to one side and shout your sneeze as loudly as you can, letting fly a vast cloud of mist and mucus, regardless of whether you're on a crowded train or in an office full of colleagues you respect too much to blow your nose in front of.

You forgot the part about coming up to my face first.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

OK, so the Japanese belch but they don't pass gas? What do they do then? And who gives a fart?

Of course in China playing with ones nose is considered very rude. It's a wonder the Chinese come to Japan at all. Maybe they don't take the trains?

3 ( +4 / -1 )

“Accordingly, Japanese will avoid bodily functions such as belching or flatulence in public entirely, or perform bodily functions as discreetly as possible.”

I agree...most Japanese are fairly polite in this regard...........so are the rest of the peoples in this world.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

There is an English version of The Traveler's Etiquette Guide to Hokkaido, chalk full of similar patronizing, insulting to non-Japanese people, and self-aggrandizing, back-patting with respect to Japanese people, rubbish. It contains plenty of unintentional irony and nihonjinron-inspired arrogance.

Some of the content: "Welcome to Hokkaido, a paradise of Japanese hospitality!" -- Don't the upstanding folks at the Hokkaido Tourism Organization realize that insulting your guests is the opposite of hospitality?

One of the section subheadings: "The Moderate and Modest Japanese People" -- Don't the HTO people see the irony in this? If a person boasts that he or she is modest, it probably means that the person is not modest.

One piece of advice offered: "Speak in a whisper" -- Yeah, right. Anyone who has lived long enough knows there is no shortage of locals not "speaking in a whisper."

Another piece of advice: "Everything with modesty – even belching" -- The ironic claim of modesty again. I guess this modesty also applies to the way many locals go about nose picking, urinating in public and noisily hocking up loogies.

I would recommend that the HTO make an instruction manual to 'teach' locals internationally acceptable manners and etiquette. These people need to get off their high horse. Rant finished, but blood still boiling...

Here is a link to the English version: http://www.visit-hokkaido.jp/assets/file/document/2016/03/data2_file_18.pdf

12 ( +13 / -1 )

“Accordingly, Japanese will avoid bodily functions such as belching or flatulence in public entirely, or perform bodily functions as discreetly as possible.”

There's a reason these bodily functions are noisy - it's a warning to others. To avoid. Run for the hills.

Those who are discrete are the real problem. Women in particular.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

Anyone who has lived long enough knows there is no shortage of locals not "speaking in a whisper."

I'm pretty certain the very word "whisper" doesn't even exist in Osaka dialect!

5 ( +6 / -1 )

Ah, once again we see Japan believing their own press. The post above mentions all the nose picking and snot swallowing. However, you forgot to mention the spitting and throwing up at train stations after binge drinking. Japan is always very good at telling others what to do, but never sees the same mistakes in their own society. After many years of living here, I can tell you for a fact that, Japanese 'bushido' actually is 'bullshido'!

15 ( +16 / -1 )

What's the official advice for snorting up snot through the reverberant nasal cavity, gargling it at the back of the throat for a while before hawking it up into the mouth and gobbing it out onto a crowded station platform?

I can only marvel at the exquisite courtesy of my genial and modest hosts when they perform this ceremony for mw every morning and evening.

7 ( +7 / -0 )

I do not have the time, but I think it would be a wonderful idea to overload the servers of the publisher and authors of this garbage with these comments, to let them know just how asinine and counter-productive this is to their image.

Typical Japanese attitude of do as I say and not as I do!

7 ( +8 / -1 )

Here is the original Chinese version of the etiquette guide, before it was revised to be "foreigner-friendly": http://www.nihonryokan-hokkaido.jp/image/kaiin/c_manners%20guide.pdf

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Don't serve fiber...

1 ( +2 / -1 )

What to say...when come to blame on Chinese or Korean (and then on any other foreigners) there always money available in Japan to help spreading the "concept of Japanese are superior". This guide is a perfect waster of money, a nonsense propaganda book, Japanese DO fart in public as much as everybody else in the world.

13 ( +14 / -1 )

Something should be mentioned here about stones and glass houses.

7 ( +8 / -1 )

then the tourism board should start by talking to these Salarymen on the trains every day. I commute here daily and the stink sometimes is nearly fatal.

Japan can be profoundly stupid when it comes to reality. Flatulence by foreigners? What about the locals?

Idiotic xenophobic fools are in charge of tourism? We and the Japanese economy are screwed if that is the case. It amazes me how daft some people can be.

12 ( +13 / -1 )

Oh my goodness... what is one to light, then?

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Japan can be profoundly stupid when it comes to reality.

Completely agree. Japan can start by looking at the log in its own eye before pointing out the speck in others. How about campaigns against salarymen picking their noses on the trains (then often eating it) and holding the handstrap afterwards? How about coughing or sneezing all over others without covering up? If find polite confrontation best with the latter group. How about penalising those who shouldn't be in the priority seats on trains? Sorry Japan, you have to look in the mirror first before complaining about foreigners and their manners.

13 ( +13 / -0 )

My wife cut and pasted the guide to our bedroom door

11 ( +12 / -1 )

There seems to be a particular section of Japanese society that isolates particular traits of common Chinese behaviour to criticize. This trend has grown with the large increase in tourism from China. A lot of it is conceit and racism (they don't seem to be aware of their own bad tendencies and they don't like the Chinese) that is encouraged by the media and such publications as this article is about. Possibly any large influx of a foreign group would receive criticism for their particular traits too.

8 ( +9 / -1 )

The Chinese government also has a guide for Chinese travelers saying much the same thing. The Japanese don't defecate and urinate in public, or on planes or in churches and temples,ok!

-11 ( +4 / -15 )

Newly married, living in the Kansai area, standing on a platform with hubby, waiting for the train when a big "stream" seemed to come out of nowhere... We turned around to see a man facing the wall behind us, happily "relieving" himself. Not to forget all the times coming home on the train after work, I had to step around the puddles of vomit...

9 ( +10 / -1 )

The Japanese don't defecate and urinate in public, or on planes or in churches and temples,ok!

Tell that to the Japanese Oyaji who I saw urinate outside a 7/11 last night in full view of everyone outside the store. There was no queue at all for the toilet inside.

ok!

13 ( +14 / -1 )

"Japanese etiquette is based on avoiding causing discomfort or nuisance to others,"

I can't count the number of times stinking Japanese ojayi caused me discomfort in the morning train.

12 ( +13 / -1 )

@Herodotus

Ah, the Joban Line going out to Fukushima.

The stench of shoes off on a 35-degree day with notes of chu-hai, dried squid and sweat is unforgettable. I remember one man who really let his feet breathe by not putting his shoes back on when he went to the bog.

Happy memories of etiquette.

5 ( +6 / -1 )

clamenza APR. 29, 2016 - 11:26AM JST Tell that to the Japanese Oyaji who I saw urinate outside a 7/11 last night in full view of everyone outside the store. There was no queue at all for the toilet inside.

There was "lack' of evidence. It was tiny, nobody else saw it.

3 ( +5 / -2 )

I'm having lunch, right now, and was served by a young man who thought nothing of snorting up his own snot, after every sentence, when taking my order, and bringing me my dishes. But I suppose he thinks it alright, as he's only serving a 'gaijin' :(

5 ( +7 / -2 )

Tell that to the Japanese Oyaji who I saw urinate outside a 7/11 last night in full view of everyone outside the store. There was no queue at all for the toilet inside.

I once saw a truck parked by the side of the road, in daylight. I heard a trickling sound coming from it. I thought it might have engine trouble, so I went to take a look. On further inspection it was an oyaji driver taking a leak on the road. A 711 was just around the corner.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

I can't stand the snorting up snot. Woman or man. JapanToday should make a reverse book telling Japanese how to behave. No snorting, no slurping, no putting on makeup in public.

7 ( +7 / -0 )

Only foreign flatulence stinks?

4 ( +5 / -1 )

I'm having lunch right now, and was served by a young man who thought nothing of snorting up his own snot, after every sentence, when taking my order, and bringing me my dishes.

You got off easy! What I hate is when they sneeze or cough all over your food, then wipe their noses with their fingers before handing your order to you (I really must stop hanging out at food courts).

On further inspection it was an oyaji driver taking a leak on the road.

I have heard that back in the early days of Japanese international tourism it wasn't uncommon to see groups of Japanese men urinating outside on the exteriors of restrooms. Apparently they also used to leave shoeprints on the seats of western-style toilets. They really have come a long way since then, haven't they!

1 ( +2 / -1 )

I can only marvel at the exquisite courtesy of my genial and modest hosts when they perform this ceremony for mw every morning and evening.

Ah yes. The gym showers are a favourite hawking spot for oyaji as well. And while we areo n the subject of public urinating, I also saw a salarymen taking a leak on a fence above some train tracks. He was lucky he didn't pee on a train. There were public toilets across the road too. I confronted him in Japanese, full flow, told him how disgusting it was. Hasn't happened again

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

What about all the Taxi drivers who take a piss anywhere they feel like it, and smokers who use the streets of Japan as their ashtray????

2 ( +3 / -1 )

“Japanese etiquette is based on avoiding causing discomfort or nuisance to others,”

Cuz they can't make a buck off the fart? Which passes in a minute or two. But some STINKER, man or woman, can wear cologne or perfume all day long causing discomfort or nuisance to others. Thank god it's not as popular here as it is in the States.

0 ( +3 / -3 )

Good advice, unless you are skilled enough to keep them silent.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

“Accordingly, Japanese will avoid bodily functions such as belching or flatulence in public entirely, or perform bodily functions as discreetly as possible.”

Absolute hogwash. Public urination is so frequent, especially during hanami season, that they have to slap stickers or pictures of torii gates all over -- and not in 'discreet' locations, either. And I can only imagine the litres of snot people snort back and drink here in order to avoid blowing in a kleenex, which only takes a second. And no one farts or belches in public??

Hope they printed these in Japanese and ask people here, especially the oyaji, to put them on their refrigerators.

"... though some local commentators have urged understanding, recalling that the emergence five decades ago of Japanese tourists as a force in global travel was often met with complaints about their behaviour."

Precisely!

5 ( +6 / -1 )

I took a look at the links Sensato provided. I'm completely baffled by how a tourism board can put out such condescending garbage. To hail your own people and their "traits" to such an extent just shows that this country is so damn clueless when it comes to anything foreign. I can't recall ever having met any people outside the world who describe itself as better than the ones they want to attract and to spend money. Despicable show of character.

9 ( +9 / -0 )

@fgm333 The Japanese don't defecate and urinate in public, or on planes or in churches and temples,ok!

I'm a retiree and frequently walk around all over Tokyo. I don't know how often I saw Japanese men who urinate in broad daylight on pedestrian walkways for everybody to see. Just last week I had to make a little detour to avoid being showered by one and no, this did not happen in some remote area but in Hatsudai/Shibuya-ku.

6 ( +6 / -0 )

" Japanese don't urinate in public "

LOL,...oh c'mon you are killing us here. I,d love to introduce you to the couple of oyajis that I come across regularly week after week on my way home that perform their pissing in public rituals next to the local Lawson as I drive by. Like clockwork....I,ve been conducting my own " etiquette campaign " by honking them every time as I drive past which doesn't seem to affect them in any way whatsoever since I,ve been seeing them perform their " bodily functions " in the same area for about a year. Gotta love country folk and their " J-discretion "....now what were you saying again?

3 ( +3 / -0 )

Another indirect racism at it's finest! What happen to the article about letting more immigrants in Japan by changing the law? Did they take it down?

0 ( +0 / -0 )

It really is quite frightening to think that, given the Japanese government has placed so many of its economic revival in the tourism basket - how much are we going to plough into the Olympics again? - there is still such a tremendous lack of basic understanding of how to treat customers.

"Welcome to Japan! Please enjoy our very famous omotenashi! Japanese people are very kind and friendly!

Now, please let us show you how your barbarian ways are frowned upon, so that you can spend all your holiday trying to achieve a level of conduct we might be able to tolerate. As a barbarian, you probably belch and fart all over the place and leave toilets covered in urine. Please don't! And remember - be on your best behaviour all the time you're here - you're only one slip away from being scowled at.

Please enjoy Japan and come back often!"

I'm wondering if the eye contact rule applies to belching and farting? You know, where if a pregnant woman or an eighty-something passenger who walks with a stick is standing right in front of you, you don't have to offer them your seat if you close your eyes tightly enough?

If a tourist pretends he can't see other diners, is he at liberty to enjoy a tremendous post-gyoza trouser cough?

7 ( +7 / -0 )

What's the official advice for snorting up snot through the reverberant nasal cavity, gargling it at the back of the throat for a while before hawking it up into the mouth and gobbing it out onto a crowded station platform?

They should hold a competition for distance snot and phlegm spitting, like the ones they have in Gunma for plum seed spitting. I'm sure some salarymen can set some world records.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

All of the above is why I hold most oyajis in pretty low regard. By oyaji, I mean 55+. That's when the transformation usually begins.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

Does anyone remember the 'Do not piss here' sign on the top of Diamond Head in Hawaii? Is it still there? I remember the sign very well because it was written in Japanese only. No sign in English. Now come on, I'm not going to defend the dirty habits of some mainland Chinese tourists (mostly country hicks who got rich quickly but never got the appropriate education), but this hypocrisy and holier than thou attitude really gets my eyes rolling.

I remember seeing an oyaji peeing without any qualms on a busy road during rush hour outside the station. For crying out loud, the best bit about Japan is the ubiquity of free public toilets.

2 ( +4 / -2 )

I just read the brochure in English. Wow. I have visited Hokkaido and more than once because I love the place and the greenery but, reading this brochure made me feel sick. I do have some questions to whoever published this brochure:

Question 1:

Is it okay and 'kind' and 'polite' behaviour for an oyaji to stare and smirk and laugh at me whilst I'm trying to finish my ramen in peace? This happened in Hokkaido sometime last year. Furthermore, upon realizing that cigarette smoke bothers me he did his best so that I would cough throughout eating and he seemed awfully pleased about my coughing. My male (also gaijin) friends tried to discourage him by staring back and blocked view of me but I could still feel his eyes on me.

Question 2:

People totally ignoring my existence when I ask questions is "polite" behaviour? For some reason that I fail to comprehend, when I approached middle-aged men with questions they would never even look at me and instead would speak to my male friends. Am I invisible? My male friends know significantly less Japanese than I do.

Now, does anyone feel like doing a similar brochure on the things that we don't like about Japanese 'etiquette' we encounter, like the ones described by all of you?

4 ( +4 / -0 )

Avoiding flatulence by tourists means a major diet change... something most people aren't going to bother with while on vacation.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Does anyone remember the 'Do not piss here' sign on the top of Diamond Head in Hawaii?

Well no, but we have those here in my suburban, middle-class neighborhood here in Japan.

There is an English version of The Traveler's Etiquette Guide to Hokkaido, chalk full of similar patronizing, insulting to non-Japanese people, and self-aggrandizing, back-patting with respect to Japanese people, rubbish.

Thank you so much for posting that! I thought I would fall out of my seat with laughter when I read it. Particularly the parts about "general etiquette dictates to avoid any unnecessary noise or speaking while chewing" and "it is considered proper style to elegantly lift items from their dishes, instead of bringing the dishes all the way up to the face." Do the people who wrote it even live in Japan?

4 ( +4 / -0 )

Barca:

Now, does anyone feel like doing a similar brochure on the things that we don't like about Japanese 'etiquette' we encounter, like the ones described by all of you?

I'm in. Where do I start?

4 ( +4 / -0 )

Particularly the parts about "general etiquette dictates to avoid any unnecessary noise or speaking while chewing" and "it is considered proper style to elegantly lift items from their dishes, instead of bringing the dishes all the way up to the face."

To be fair, they specify "chewing" and not "slurping" (as in what you find in any ramen shop).

2 ( +2 / -0 )

This is not to bash Japanese or anything. Only speaking from experience without adding or subtracting :-D

Some Japanese are just as dirty and smelly. In my office there was a young J-girl about my age/ in her late 20s - who had habit of not taking shower/ minding her smell. Her division members of my nationality even said blatantly to her to please be cleaner and to think about others, and smell pollution. When I enter the company I was having the highest opinion about Japanese being 'greater' than other Asians (my naivety as a young womanl, who only know about Japan from glossed up advertising, manga/anime, and the high-end part of Japan (I only know Ginza, Ropppongi, and the like, from short holidays)). My state is totally likened like having unicorn shitting rainbow. I'm glad with the harsh wakeup call. Having mixed day in- day out with around 30 real Japanese who are expat in my office, my opinion changed drastically. This also what makes me find out about Japan Today website, since I wish to read a lot about the reality ^^ Just from observing quietly behind my desk (while my unicorn slowly dies off), I am force fed that: They're not the politest, not the smartest (sometimes they find it hard to improvise, since they work like robots), not more modest (especially when its company money to spree on expensive washoku places. But if its their own money, um - my boss even grumbles on those hard starbucks sandwich), OR whatever they want to think/ believe they are, compared with the rest of planet earth. In fact, I do think that rather a lot of them seems to be double faced, hold grudges rather easily, having backwards or closed off way of thinking, stingy, likes ganging up to bully the weaker (even if its another Japanese in the office), likes to mince words/ not straightforward so they can twist around their words, some had the 'holier than thou attitude' I read a lot in Japan Today, etc (while in truth, its their gain to be send as an expat because as an expat they had to be given managerial position --> back in Japan they sit on row like ordinary staff and not at the head of table). By perusing the crime section of this website, I see rather lots who also have streaks of cruelty/ mental fragileness. Reading the crime section on Japan Today makes me shocked, actually. Because its the Japanese who think highly about themselves, sometimes too highly, that people who look from outside (like me) believe them too. Hah, stop dreaming la, Japanese. You're like a cake I baked on home-economic class at junior high. It burnt black and raise in a disgusting way (everyone called it cancer cake). But I slathered it with buttercream and decorate with butter flowers so it looks presentable and I pass the baking test.

My office is a branch of SOJITZ Trading company. In a large capital city.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

I think this whole thread stinks, but let me air this out.

Just offhand, thinking of all of the different offensive bodily functions that should not be out there in public, I can't think of ONE where I have not seen the WORST example outside of Japan. I mean, if I had to give prizes for nose picking, it would have to go to a guy in Australia who was picking and eating between bites of breakfast. Juicy slimy stuff, in a dining room, absolutely vomit inducing. Public urination/defecation prizes go to the several people I saw doing it at the Seoul train station. Kids. Grampas. Just wow. And although I have been to many nomikai over the years, do they even come close to Spring Break or just an average frat party in the US? Fouled toilets and despicable toilet manners are surely the domain of the US, right? The basic facilities might be nice, but vandalism and simple lack of consideration make a lot of restrooms look like the third world.

I don't think anybody has a monopoly on civilized behavior. Maybe we could all just try to improve. And if you don't think you need to improve, you are probably part of the problem... or at least part of somebody's problem.

-3 ( +2 / -5 )

Perhaps the installation of flatulence collection stations would relieve this problem. People could go into booths that look like the enclosures for smoking, and let loose. Cartoon characters of hippos could be drawn on the outside to provide easy identification. Maybe the collected gases could power street lights or something.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

"And although I have been to many nomikai over the years, do they even come close to Spring Break or just an average frat party in the US? Fouled toilets and despicable toilet manners are surely the domain of the US, right?"

Tough one. My previous workplace was near a university in Tokyo and I can remember sinks filled with vomit in more than one izakaya in the area. To be honest, I wasnt too angry - I had a few piss-ups like that when I was that age.

The point is I did want to wash my hands after having a slash. Something which I can't say is observed by all here. A bit like many countries I suppose.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Tell that to the Japanese Oyaji who I saw urinate outside a 7/11 last night in full view of everyone outside the store. There was no queue at all for the toilet inside.

He was drunk, he doesn't remember a thing.

I don't think anybody has a monopoly on civilized behavior. Maybe we could all just try to improve. And if you don't think you need to improve, you are probably part of the problem... or at least part of somebody's problem.

I think you are missing the whole point of the thread. No one here is denying any other cultures are better than the Japanese. Just that at least, unlike the Japanese, we admit it.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

5Speedracer5: "And if you don't think you need to improve, you are probably part of the problem... or at least part of somebody's problem."

Yeah, but that's the thing -- the guides are written as though the Japanese who made them think they do not, and Japanese do not, have to improve whatsoever; that poor manners are defined by the actions of outsiders, and that they do not need to follow what they wrote at all. Did you even read them? The funny thing is, you could take the exact same guides, and hand them out to Japanese tourists on big bus group tours in other countries (add that the must tip in some countries!), and they would say, "But Japanese don't do these things!" and would be offended, and they would have a right to because the guides are offensive.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

Japan bashing Ganjin! Tokyo is a city of 18 million people, it is one of the cleanest and best run in the world. try Bejing,Calcutta and I could go on and on. get over your culture shock and ethnocentrism OK!!!

-5 ( +1 / -6 )

Herodotus

I'm in. Where do I start?

I do have an idea or two, but I don't want to get blacklisted in Japan haha.

5SpeedRacer5

With all the rude behaviour we see in Japan, I see 50x as much in my own country and elsewhere, it is just that I don't know of many other countries which have a "holier than thou- my people is better than yours" attitude on etiquette. Definitely not where I come from and it is crazy to just judge all gaijin as one type. "You are this and this" People can be rude no matter what country they come from and what is rude for culture A is not rude for culture B and so, if Japan cannot be sure that Japanese are ALL polite, Japan cannot judge gaijin!

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Agreed that levels of rudeness vary from country to country. Japan is in no position however, to make a stupid pamphlet like this.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Lots good posts here. All I can say is that I hope a chinese woman doesn't get groped while riding JR Yamanote Line while visiting Tokyo. I wonder if those pamphlets mentions this scenario.

7 ( +7 / -0 )

All I can say is that I hope a chinese woman doesn't get groped while riding JR Yamanote Line while visiting Tokyo.

A Chinese woman would likely slap/strike the nearest likely perpetrator. Basically, Japanese trains have their priorities wrong. Ultimately mobile phone use doesn't really harm anyone, so constant announcements about switching phones off near priority seats are useless. And in any case I've seen young, healthy people sitting in those seats time and again - while leaving the elderly and infirm to stand nearby. Train companies should be focussing their efforts on coughing, and sneezing manners. Both of these contribute to the spread of germs - and that does bother people. There should also be anti-nose picking promotions. It seems parents failed in their duties for many of these people. I've seen pickers swallow the contents of their finger, and then go on to put their hand on a strap. Not a single word about this on any train poster so far.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

therougouAPR. 29, 2016 - 01:39PM JST I can't stand the snorting up snot. Woman or man. JapanToday should make a reverse book telling Japanese how to behave. No snorting, no slurping, no putting on makeup in public.

I agree about the constant snorting of some idiots! So annoying! Get some damn tissue for god's sake!

I don't agree with your problem of putting on make-up in public, though. What annoys you about it? If you want that to be prohibited, the what's next? kids playing gameboy in the train, ppl using smartphones? (even though I think that the constant smartphone tunnel view of many passengers is more annoying to me than a girl putting on make-up).

1 ( +1 / -0 )

No need to crack down on make up. What needs a crackdown is the big three: picking, and uncovered sneezing and snorting. People should minimize the spread of bacteria

2 ( +3 / -1 )

YES, please do not do any of these. Belching can be easily controlled by doing so softly into a napkin, or the like. Saying excuse me isn't going to cut it in Japan as it is rude and they don't have the it is okay IF you apologise for it like in the west.

Farting in public is a no-no, and NO CROP DUSTING!! There are PLENTY of public toilets around Japan, always easily found in most Konbini's (convenience stores) and the like. HOLD IT IN and go to the bathroom. This includes blowing your nose as well. You can wipe your nose, but not blow it in public.

Remember, this is common courtesy when entering a new country entirely different than your own. As if you seen foreigners doing things in our own countries that is very rude, we wouldn't like it at all either -- and with Japan having so many courtesy rules, info about what to do and not to do is easily found online and off. Keep your manners.

NOTE: I notice people mentioning about smoking, it is very common for people to smoke, but with western influence there is a lot of change since 2010 when I first went to Japan. You cannot smoke and walk at the same time (ash can get in kids face, or a hot part of that ash and annoy people walking), you have to smoke outside in approved areas ONLY.

Yes, there are still bars and restaurants where there is smoking and non-smoking seats without a division or a separate closed off room --- but there are some places with at least a closed off room for the smokers to sit, and slowly the smoking inside laws will change. Just like how it took a while for them to change slowly here in Canada as well.

-7 ( +0 / -7 )

"Just like how it took a while for them to change slowly here in Canada as well."

You're joking, right?

3 ( +3 / -0 )

I don't agree with your problem of putting on make-up in public, though. What annoys you about it?

Putting on make-up is a dangerous art! I've seen young women actually using heated curling irons, and eyelash curlers, on the train. Think about it.

It takes up a lot of space. Women who haul their make-up bags, mirrors, and curling irons onto public transport usually require an additional seat, which is fine during the non-rush hours, but not so fine when other people want to sit down.

It's just plain rude. What would you think of a man pulling out a mirror, a can of shaving cream, and a razor on the train?
-1 ( +2 / -3 )

Seeing people putting on make up is annoying, but it is a lesser evil

0 ( +2 / -2 )

Reading the above article on etiquette, the phrase "don't do as I do, do as I say" springs to mind.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

And please teach Japanese in school they shall never slurp noodles or spaghetti in front of foreigners as this is rude.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

-1 Good Bad Ghost riderMAY. 02, 2016 - 10:21PM JST And please teach Japanese in school they shall never slurp noodles or spaghetti in front of foreigners as this is rude.

When in Rome do as the Romans!! Ghost Rider YOU ARE IN THEIR COUNTRY,NO!

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

The pamphlet is incredibly condescending and an insult to non Japanese. It's biggest gaff is trying to explain how Japanese people are or are not. Forget salaryman nose/ear picking, horking up snot, whatever, public smoking here trumps any visitors' bad manners. The fact that in 2016, people can still light up in so many public places shows that Japanese don't give a monkey's about others except themselves.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

The Japanese don't defecate and urinate in public, or on planes or in churches and temples,ok!

I have never seen such a public piss-fest outside of Paris since moving to Tokyo.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

To me it is a good idea to teach anyone, not just tourists but also all other people, particularly to men, to refrain from public “belching or flatulence.” It is just gross!

0 ( +0 / -0 )

1 Good Bad NathalieBMAY. 04, 2016 - 04:44AM JST The Japanese don't defecate and urinate in public, or on planes or in churches and temples,ok!

I have never seen such a public piss-fest outside of Paris since moving to Tokyo

Try the following; New York,L.A. Rome (especially in the square outside the Vatican, Rio,Mexico city...where do I stop? oh maybe London. You people have traveled and lived in other cultures???? Hard to believe from your comments!

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Never seen, sniff, so much, sniff, agreement or so many, sniff, thumbs-up on JT in my, sniff, life. Baaarrrfff.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Ladies putting on make-up on the train is OK, I think.

It could be thought of as trashy behavior, I suppose, but somehow a bit of trashy behavior from a lady seems good.

Also, for a guy, it's kind of fascinating to watch and see how it is done.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Yeah, I've never had a problem with girls doing their makeup on the train. I figure it's an efficient use of their time.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

I think there is one thing that gets my back up so quickly is noisy eating or talking whilst you have a mouth full of food, how disgusting is this its not necessary, and it makes me feel sick! it taught my child to eat and drink quietly, and to keep there mouths closed, on TV there are often fizzy or alcohol drinks advertised, but why does the person who opens the tin and gulps,(and very loudly) greches the drink down and then gives a gasp of air after wards? ok its satisfying and refreshing but do we have to enfersise that gulping noise? is it necessary ?sorry ill have to get off my soap box now.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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