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Unusual bond heals wounds for American WWII POWs who will visit Japan

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Thank you. Hope that it leads to better things.

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Too Little, Too Late should replace "Yokoso Japan."

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Tenney says he plans to bow to the Japanese out of respect and courtesy for the first time as he meets with lawmakers and foreign ministry officials, not out of fear as he did during the war.

It takes a very big man to do something like this.

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It is disgusting that the companies that enslaved these men won't acknowledge them. Shows that deep down, not much has changed in corporate Japan, or the government for that matter. It is remarkable that Ambassador Fujisaki took it upon himself to reach out. He will probably lose his standing when he returns to Japan though.

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Great story. Two great men. People probably don't realize what a big thing Fujisaki has done.

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It impresses me that even after the obviously horrendous treatment by Japanese soldiers during the war, only a little over 2 decades later, his family hosted a Japanese student in their home. It reminds me that for decades the Pearl Harbor survivors and the Japanese pilots who bombed them meet every few years to play baseball together in Hawaii or Japan. I get the impression there may be hope for the human race. It is truly crappy that Japanese companies involved won't get involved, but I guess they will say "Well, I wasn't there" or they want to avoid the negative PR.

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I agree with The758 at 7:42 AM 12th Sept.

It's too bad Nippon Coke and Engineering won't acknowledge their history and at least express regret for what happened.

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I live a short distance from the slave labor mines at Kameishi. The locals here don't even know it existed (or they aren't willing to admit it). The mine continued to operate even after the atomic bombings right up until the surrender. The mine was shelled by the allies who were unaware that POWs were imprisoned there. The local English recitation contest always seems to include an essay denouncing the post-Nagasaki bombing of a nearby rail station which continued to send trains to and from the mine. The students have no idea about the terrible truth of their own hometown's history. How can you show remorse for something that you are unaware of or deny? How can you treat a wound festered by ignorance?

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Perhaps we could some respectful message to Nippon Coke and Engineering.

http://www.n-coke.com/en/enquiries/index.html (English)

http://www.n-coke.com/enquiries/index.html (Japanese)

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I remember hearing a story about a man (early 1950s) who used to suddenly wake up in the middle of the night at a boys' univ. dormitory screaming "Kill them all! Kill them all!" This really startled the newcomers who would ask what's wrong with that guy, and the others would calmly reply, "Don't pay any attention to him. He was in a Japanese P.O.W. camp." And that was that. Everybody would show their respect and sympathy for the guy by giving him his space.

It's impossible to imagine what cruel conditions these unfortunate P.O.W.s had to endure.

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The companies were ordered to do so by the mitiary government so, as Tenney mentions, it is basically the government of the time who are to blame.

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The companies didn't object to the free labor then (Aso) and they don't consider what they did 'bad' as they were 'only following orders.' Not a reason not to apologize or at least acknowledge the situation existed.

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Couldn`t agree more with most of you. The companies really should apologize too. Why not? It would just show that they are not like that now.

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Ambassador Fujisaki for PM. Someone like him, with a thoughtful mind, good heart, and capable of independent action, could save Japan. At the very least, I really admire him. And the remaining POWs, but of course. What a story!

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Its a shame the Japanese POWs cant build bridges with their allied captors...ah but they were mostly killed so that would be impossible.

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Whats going on? Where are all teh regulars who say the Japan ahs made countless apologies? Doesnt look loke many of the Japanese have regretregarding the POW`S.

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Its a shame the Japanese POWs cant build bridges with their allied captors...ah but they were mostly killed so that would be impossible.

95% of Japanese PoWs survived the war, only 45% of allied PoWs did...

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Tokyo Tanuki, Thank you for relating that important fact Re: death rates for Allied POWs vs. Japanese POWs. I can't imagine what 888naf is on about.

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I can't believe that people are actually expecting private enterprises to send an apology for something that more than likely noone with in the company today are responsible for.

How many people have ancestor's that were responsible for another persons pain and suffering? Or worked for a company that was responsible for killing millions?

Do you ask the armament corporations of today for an apology for all the innocent people killed in Iraq or Afghanistan because their products were to blame?

It's like asking all the companies that participated in the development of of bombs or airplanes that dropped them on Hiroshima and Nagasaki to do the same.

The government should take the steps to rectify the situation starting with changing the history texts here in Japan to acknowledge Japan's part in WWII.

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Whats going on? Where are all teh regulars who say the Japan ahs made countless apologies?

I'm a regular and a Japanophile most of the time. But I don't condone what happended to POWs at the hands of the Japanese Imperial army. Neither do I condone what the Nazis did, or anybody else who killed or mistreated anybody who could not fight back.

There was/is a sizable number of Japanese who never wanted the war to happen. Anybody who opposed was jailed, sent to camps, etc. How about some sympathy for them while we are at it?

Anyway, good on Mr. Fujisaki. The world needs more people like him, not people who stir up hate.

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"Tokyo Tanuki, Thank you for relating that important fact Re: death rates for Allied POWs vs. Japanese POWs. I can't imagine what 888naf is on about."

..."take no prisoners" attitude to start off with

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..."take no prisoners" attitude to start off with

I think you need to read a bit before you comment, or else we're just not getting you. The allies did take Japanese prisoners - those that would surrender. And most lived.

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tigermoth at 05:15 AM JST - 14th September. I think you need to read a bit before you comment, or else we're just not getting you. The allies did take Japanese prisoners - those that would surrender. And most lived.

Most lived? If you look at one example of facts during invasion of Okinawa by U.S. troops, there were many first hand interviews from veterans and studies of facts were made of this war. Yes, U.S. had many Japanese POW's in custody. However, even if they surrendered, since they were in the middle of the combat zone, they could not take most of these POW's or finding proper security location and were shot in the back of the head execution style. This has been well documented.

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As allied POWs from the UK & the USA soon discovered, the Japanese soldiers considered surrender shameful. Thus, their cruel treatment of allied POWs and their willingness & desire to die rather than surrender is a documented historical fact.

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After all these years I cant believe people on both sides want apologies. Why can't they just let it go, the only ones that should give any apology for atrocities or nukes should be the governments from that time, not the governments in place now. Its just a waste of time to want this crap now. my 2 cents

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