lifestyle

You know you’re in Japan when…

77 Comments
By Amy Chavez, RocketNews24

“You know you’ve been in Japan too long when you start bowing on the telephone” is an old classic. But how about those things that, even if you haven’t been here long, still make you stop and think, yup, this is definitely Japan.

This is just our list and everyone is sure to have their own, but we hope you’ll enjoy these little gems, and perhaps even add your own in the comments section.

Okay, ready?

You know you’re in Japan when…

1. They’re blasting The Carpenters over the speakers at a restaurant.

The Carpenters (yes, the American pop duo of the '60s and '70s) is still popular in Japan whether at karaoke with friends or at a restaurant. The group having recorded 11 albums of easy-listening music over their career means that it’s not likely you’re going get too far away from being on the “Top of the World,” in the Land of the Rising Sun.

2. When the department store plays Auld Lang Syne over the speakers at the end of the day.

Hearing this old Scottish tune usually makes one think of the end of the year…unless, that is, you’re in Japan, where the tune is played at the closure of almost anything, from stores to the end of two-hour parties. The tune even has a Japanese version called “Hotaru no Hikari”.

3. The party lasts exactly two hours.

Many official parties in Japan (end of the year parties, beginning of the year parties, and work-related parties) take place in rented banquet rooms, so hotels and conference facilities rent them out in two-hour lots. And you best be out by the time the next customer’s party starts in that same room. Even if, at the end of the second hour, things are just starting to groove, the tell-tale bars of Auld Lang Syne, punctuated by farewells from the emcee, will signal the time to exit.

4. Everyone waits patiently at the pedestrian crossing, even though there are no cars coming.

In Japan, most people don’t cross the street until the red “don’t walk” guy turns into the green “walk” guy, even if they can see for miles down the street and there’s not a vehicle in sight.

5. When you see little kids performing their school show at the mall, dancing to hip hop lyrics so foul, you could never print them in a newspaper.

From strange English to just plain offensive English, Western culture can rear its ugly English head in some strange places, from song lyrics to slogans printed on t-shirts, their ill meanings unbeknownst to the Japanese. There’s nothing quite like the sight of a room full of seven-year-old kids happily eating lunch at school while listening to uncensored gangster rap.

6. You buy a pencil and they insist on wrapping it.

It’s easy to mistake “service” for “waste” when store clerks put a single item in a giant plastic bag or wrap it up for you.

7. When green tea isn’t just tea — it’s a flavor

In Japan you can get green tea flavored ice cream (McDonald’s matcha McFlurry anyone?), matcha white wine, matcha mochi, matcha Kitkats, and even matcha-infused popcorn. It’s matcha mania.

8. When it’s snowing and a woman rides by on a bike wearing a skirt…with two kids…and an umbrella up and her cell phone out.

The Japanese are known for their deft multitasking skills when it comes to bicycle riding, but few can compete with young mothers who can seemingly juggle any combination of minor tasks while battling the elements.

9. When a wooden stamp is more legally-binding than a signature.

You’d better not forget to bring your hanko, or name seal, when doing official business in Japan. The problem is that, unlike a signature where you can’t forget to bring your hand, you can forget to bring your hanko with you, and without it you won’t get very far.

10. There are flowers in the public toilet (even if they’re fake).

That little triangle fold at the end of the toilet paper sheet is just a little nicety to let you know you’re the first one to use the toilet since it has been cleaned.

11. When the waiter chases you down because you “forgot your change”.

Remember: tipping isn’t a thing in Japan, so if you leave even a couple of hundred yen on the table, your waiter will want to reunite you with it.

12. When people flash their hazards to thank you on the road.

Whether thanking you for giving way or for having to cut in front of you, the standard way of saying “thank you” in Japan is to flash the hazard lights. You might encounter this in some other countries around the world, too, but in Japan it’s so common you’d think it was a part of their license test…

13. When you see people leaving their valuables unattended.

Whether they’re going inside from the terrace of a restaurant to order or just going to load up on cakes at the Mr. Donut counter, it’s common to see people leave their expensive coat, camera or even handbags on a table while doing so.

14. When your bill is brought to you on a tiny strip of paper with just the total hand-written on it.

At the hairdresser’s, where my haircut gets progressively more expensive despite continuing deflation, after the cut the stylist hands me a tiny slip of torn paper with an amount written on it and says “Yoroshii desuka?” (“Is this OK?”)

More recently, at a restaurant in Okinawa, I went to pay the bill for a party of six and was also given a small slip of paper that just said “35,000 yen”. You’re not supposed to ask, you’re just expected to pay. I did ask, but was told they didn’t give receipts. Thank goodness Japan is such a trusting country!

15. When a business shies away from publicity because it doesn’t want its product to become TOO popular.

Just like many Japanese people feel that a restaurant that becomes too popular no longer has good food because they are too busy trying to please people rather than focus on cooking, others feel their boutique product is too special for regular consumption and may lose its exclusivity if it becomes too popular.

16. People wave goodbye until you’re out of sight.

The Japanese goodbye is legendary. The waves never stop until the guest is wholly and absolutely out of the line of sight.

Read more stories from RocketNews24. -- You’re not seeing things, that’s a cat selling roasted sweet potatoes -- The “doya-gao” phenomenon and where you’re most likely to see it -- Japanese homebuilder offers virtual reality tour of your new home while you’re still designing it

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77 Comments
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6 should read mistakes waste for service. #10 always throw away that triangle. Where the person's hands clean when they made it? I really like #12. Even if they have been rude cutting in front. At least they acknowledge .
0 ( +1 / -1 )

Don't think it's a matter of being in Japan "too long", it's more a matter of becoming accustomed to the "customs" of the country one lives in. People can be here a short time and appreciate these things too!

4 ( +6 / -2 )

You know you’ve been in Japan too long when...

you purposely mispronounce English words to make it easier for people to understand you.

37 ( +39 / -2 )

When you see little kids performing their school show at the mall, dancing to hip hop lyrics so foul, you could never print them in a newspaper.

Number five was my laugh for the day because I've seen these situations so many times in Japan where very explicit music is played in the most unlikely places.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

All great points.

Title could also have been "you know you're missing Japan too much when you haven't experienced... for a while". What a country!

4 ( +5 / -1 )

When you see people leaving their valuables unattended.

You know, I will sound really naive but I LOVE that im able to do that in Japan. Go to a cafe, leave your phone on the table to mark the table as taken, get your drink and come back and its STILL there. Fantastic. Unfortunately one day someone will take it and I can not enjoy that pleasure anymore.

15 ( +17 / -2 )

Ah yes. Every day I have a "wow, only in Japan" moment such as these. I love this country and will never leave!!

3 ( +6 / -3 )

@papigiulio

Unfortunately one day someone will take it and I can not enjoy that pleasure anymore.

I once stupidly left my very expensive briefcase in my bicycle basket while popping into the combini one late night - gone within 30secs. They left the other 3 bags, though!

I'd add: to the list:

Being incessantly ear-bashed by loudspeakers wherever you go - be it on the train, in a store or just around town. Noise, noise everywhere! Drives me insane.
17 ( +18 / -1 )

Everyone waits patiently at the pedestrian crossing, even though there are no cars coming.

Guess Nagoya isn't part of Japan after all.

9 ( +11 / -2 )

Stupid and not so special list. But the most annoying is the byebye crap. I hate that long extended byebye. So rude, obnoxious, loud and not cute at all.

-8 ( +8 / -17 )

When you see people leaving their valuables unattended.

I once left my Louis Vuitton wallet, (with all my cards, cash, ID etc ) and my cell phone on the sink in a public toilet. 30 minutes later I realized and ran back and they were still there.

10 ( +10 / -0 )

I left my fairly expensive mountain bike at the convenience store a couple of weeks back, unlocked, when I went late at night from my office. Usually I just walk, but for some reason I rode my bike. When I left the store, I walked back to my office without thinking. In the morning, I left the office, and I thought someone stole my bike, but then I remembered I rode it to the store. I went to the store - and it was still there, 8 hours later, unlocked, and untouched.

5 ( +10 / -5 )

No. 8. Saw the "tourist variation" the other day. Dad (Asian), on power-assisted bike with two kids, holding a long selfie-stick, will cycling! On the sidewalk as well!

-2 ( +4 / -6 )

You know your are in Japan when childish lyrics played at full blast assault your ears in various stores..particularly electronic stores.

Sometimes I wonder if those songs are to clear people out in a hurry....at least that is the effect they have on me

5 ( +8 / -3 )

Lost my wallet 3 times. Got it back once. Not everyone is honest.

6 ( +10 / -4 )

Glad to see that even after so many years of writing experience, Amy Chavez is still pushing her boundaries and challenging herself to put out some top-quality work.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Number 4 isn't being observed to the degree that it was a decade or more ago. Slippage, Japan. Slippage....

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Should rename this to "You know you're an American in Japan when"... most of these are "normal" in many parts of the world.

4 ( +8 / -4 )

You know you're in Japan when... You can order lunch at any restaurant in Tokyo just by knowing the first three letters of the alphabet.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

No. 4 is not always true...

As for No. 12, we've been doing that in France for many, many years too... Also, as in Japan, we flash the headlights to allow someone wishing to turn (right in Japan, left in France) have the "right of way".

2 ( +2 / -0 )

"I once left my Louis Vuitton wallet, (with all my cards, cash, ID etc ) and my cell phone on the sink in a public toilet. 30 minutes later I realized and ran back and they were still there"

You know you've been in Japan too long when you own a Louis Vuitton wallet ;).

27 ( +28 / -1 )

sensei258: "you purposely mispronounce English words to make it easier for people to understand you."

That goes with any nation where English is not the mother tongue. While you're not necessarily doing any favours to the listener by doing so, you often have to pronounce "English" words with the accent/words of the nation you are in.

Anyway, as usual this is a list of things that are observations that OCCASIONALLY occur, and are sometimes even illegal, but are gross generalisations.

And, sorry... if you have been in Japan "too long" you really don't notice the things that are different that much, unless they are constant sources of irritation due to said illegalities, though, yes, you have been in Japan for at least a little while when you can say, ONLY in Japan (and usually only negative things, too).

-11 ( +2 / -13 )

when you start noticing that someone is watching you all the time but pretending they are doing something that amounts to absolutely nothing

7 ( +7 / -0 )

That goes with any nation where English is not the mother tongue. While you're not necessarily doing any favours to the listener by doing so, you often have to pronounce "English" words with the accent/words of the nation you are in.

This was a godsend for me when I first came to Japan. If I was trying to say/do something and they couldn't understand, I'd just try saying the English word in Japanese pronunciation, and often it got my point across!

1 ( +3 / -2 )

You know you’re in Japan when… You go to your local neighborhood Starbucks and see 80 percent of the customers sleeping peacefully with their lattes.

10 ( +10 / -0 )

You know you're in Japan when you go into a steak restaurant, order a beef steak but fancy a fried egg on it and they won't add it on for you, even though they have plenty of eggs, which they only want to serve with the hamburg steaks.........

10 ( +10 / -0 )

Number five was my laugh for the day because I've seen these situations so many times in Japan where very explicit music is played in the most unlikely places.

Yes...System of a Down in the gym was a bit startling...

1 ( +2 / -1 )

"I once left my Louis Vuitton wallet, (with all my cards, cash, ID etc ) and my cell phone on the sink in a public toilet. 30 minutes later I realized and ran back and they were still there"

Thieves probably realized it was a knock-off and felt sorry for whom ever the owner was. People are fools to think that all Japanese have the same moral mind set about valuables.

7 ( +10 / -3 )

I can personally relate to most of them and in my travels I find at least half of them to be more Japanese than any place I have been.

I knew I was in Japan too long when i first came home and bowed or said "hai" or "un" to Asian people , usually who were Korean in my area. I had to catch myself a lot...in some situations I had to explain to which they wanted to know "why not Korea?".

Then after longer in Japan I was using Japanese with everyone,..... who then looked at me strange. It becomes so automatic sometimes and I am sure many can relate..

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Daydream Believer over the speakers in the Konbini

3 ( +4 / -1 )

Hearing Christmas songs when it's not Christmas.

-2 ( +2 / -4 )

when people reverse park even when driving in forward is easier, when people think hazard lights means you can stop on a main rd to talk on your phone even when your causing a traffic jam and theres a side rd not even 10m away. when people all que in the left lane at the traffic lights even when the right lane is empty.

5 ( +6 / -1 )

Daydream Believer over the speakers in the Konbini

You would hear that song at some point during the day at every single supermarket in the US.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

WKYIJW wedding guests wear black suits, and there's the same two-hour protocol.

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

You dress for the calendar, and not for the actual weather. For example, on a chilly, blustery day like today you walk around in an open-necked shirt and a thin cotton sweater. You do this because you know that if you wear any more layers of clothing you will get asked incredulously, "aren't you hot?" by your shivering, blue-lipped colleagues. Because folks, according to the calendar, it's Spring!

(Oh, and on a steaming hot day in late October you show up for work in a half-sleeved blouse, and everybody asks you in astonishment if you don't feel cold, and then a kind colleague intercedes by explaining to everyone that foreigners have higher body temperatures than Japanese people ... and you don't bother to argue, you just feel really, really grateful to that colleague for pointing out the obvious!)

8 ( +9 / -1 )

In the morning, I left the office, and I thought someone stole my bike, but then I remembered I rode it to the store. I went to the store - and it was still there, 8 hours later, unlocked, and untouched.

Yeah, yeah, this kind of idyllic story is easily contradicted, actually by my own experience. I got my four summer tires stolen a few days ago. Actually they were paired with high grade 17-inch wheels so they were after those. They were stored outside of the house in a sort of closet. It was not protected by a strong locker, actually it was easily breakable, which they did and took everything. They actually knew that the wheels were stored there (as I use different wheels with the winter tires), they did not come to my closet just by chance. So no Japan is not Walt Disney where only good things happen. So when I hear some people who try to paint it as this, it simply makes me smoke.

You know you’re in Japan when…

You see everyday unsympathetic huffy people, always in a hurry moving in all directions, and not apologizing when they do something inappropriate like hitting you with the handlebar of their bicycle. Something that happened to me as early as today on my way to lunch....
-4 ( +4 / -8 )

"when you start noticing that someone is watching you all the time but pretending they are doing something that amounts to absolutely nothing"

I assume you are talking about life in a Japanese office.

On that topic, does anybody else refer to Saturday and Sunday as 'holidays' rather than 'the weekend'?

4 ( +4 / -0 )

Outside of No. 5 and 14, the remainder in aggregate seem appealing enough for me, including The Carpenters.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Not an entirely inaccurate list but I tripped over

The Japanese are known for their deft multitasking skills

Oh my... they're definitely, absolute, unequivocally not known for this lol

5 ( +6 / -1 )

@savethegaijin

Yes, that gave me a giggle. It seems that most of the Japanese people on the street can't manage to walk in a straight line in a manner that doesn't inconvenience everyone around them.

0 ( +3 / -3 )

@Tessa

You dress for the calendar, and not for the actual weather.

Well that's the single most accurate thing I've ever read about Japan lol

4 ( +6 / -2 )

"Everyone waits patiently at the pedestrian crossing, even though there are no cars coming."

30 years ago that was true.

" I thought someone stole my bike, but then I remembered I rode it to the store. I went to the store - and it was still there, 8 hours later, unlocked, and untouched."

Lucky you! I've had two bikes stolen,and they were locked.

You know you're in Japan when you get pushed on and off the train if you're anywhere near the door when it's crowded.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

5. When you see little kids performing their school show at the mall, dancing to hip hop lyrics so foul, you could never print them in a newspaper.

An oldie but goody going clear back 1979, my first trip to Japan, and sitting across from an obaa-san on the subway who is carrying a marketing bag with "F#$%" written all over it.

savethegaijinMAR. 28, 2016 - 10:09PM JST @Tessa You dress for the calendar, and not for the actual weather. Well that's the single most accurate thing I've ever read about Japan lol

Or being on the subway and either it's freezing and too early for heat or, worse yet, it's already hot and too early for the air conditioning.

StrangerlandMAR. 28, 2016 - 12:15PM JST That goes with any nation where English is not the mother tongue. While you're not necessarily doing any favours to the listener by doing so, you often have to pronounce "English" words with the accent/words of the nation you are in.

This was a godsend for me when I first came to Japan. If I was trying to say/do something and they couldn't understand, I'd just try saying the English word in Japanese pronunciation, and often it got my point across!

First time in Mickey D's, also on the 1979 trip, and I could not get a simple cheeseburger and fries ordered. Didn't know katakana yet (the Devil's Tongue) or that fries were 'furai potatosu."

-2 ( +2 / -4 )

...when you land in Japan.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

You know you've been in Japan too long . . .

when you go back to your home country and you bow to sales people and thank them after purchasing something.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

Number 4 is something I do as well, for the last seven years anyway. Seeing a friend get hit by a car should not be how you learn to be patient at crossings. Now, even if there are no cars within 50 miles, I'll still wait for the green man.

Number 7 sounds nice. I've tried sakura matcha kitkat. Surprisingly nice. I'd like to try Sakura pepsi as well.

System of a Down in the gym was a bit startling..

Really? Some SoaD songs are pretty good to work out to. I find BYOB and Chop Suey are good for boxing, while Question and Sad Statue are good for running. But that's just me.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Cigaro...with repetitious C words....

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Daitohak, where do you live? Adachi?

2 ( +2 / -0 )

You know you’re in Japan when…

You catch salarymen out in front of the no-smoking signs on the street, puffing away. Japanese people are great for obeying traffic signals, but cannot bring themselves to enforce existing anti-smoking legislation

-3 ( +0 / -3 )

... when you do not mind pouring the drinks of your male coworkers despite being a woman of European origin (but then, I know that when I do this they become much more cooperative when I need help :)

3 ( +4 / -1 )

Good point Jane. Kind of, you scratch my back, I scratch yours

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Everyone waits patiently at the pedestrian crossing, even though there are no cars coming.

Is this list based on Tokyo? 90% of people in the Kansai area cross even when cars are coming.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

... when you do not mind pouring the drinks of your male coworkers despite being a woman of European origin (but then, I know that when I do this they become much more cooperative when I need help :)

I am going to be kind here and assume that you don't do that for a living. I have never in my working life poured a drink for a man, and I hope I never do.

Is this list based on Tokyo? 90% of people in the Kansai area cross even when cars are coming.

Definitely a Tokyo thing. Kansai and Kanto may as well be two different countries, culturally.

-3 ( +3 / -6 )

I have never in my working life poured a drink for a man, and I hope I never do.

I have, and for women as well. Nothing wrong with it.

6 ( +7 / -1 )

I know i've been in Japan long enough when I experience culture shock returning to my own country. What a crappy feeling.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

I have never in my working life poured a drink for a man, and I hope I never do

I personally don't mind pouring drink for men at all. I don't know what's so bad about this.. Like Strangerland says, men pour drinks for women, too, and I don't normally see men complaining about it. If you feel humiliated pouring drinks for men, don't do it, but I don't feel that way.. When I see an empty glass, it's just a nice gesture to say "do you want more?" :)

2 ( +3 / -1 )

When I see an empty glass, it's just a nice gesture to say "do you want more?" :)

Me too!

2 ( +3 / -1 )

I have never in my working life poured a drink for a man, and I hope I never do.

Re-read. I believe I said working life.

Whoosh!

-3 ( +0 / -3 )

That still doesn't change my own comment - I have poured drinks for my women and men both as an employee, and as a boss.

Nothing wrong with pouring a drink for someone. There is something wrong if you are told to do it because you are a woman. But that doesn't mean you should never pour a drink for someone, just that its not right if forced to because of your sex.

To me it's like when people get angry about a woman who does all the cooking. There is nothing wrong with a woman doing all the cooking, the problem is in expecting a woman to do all the cooking simply because she's a woman.

4 ( +5 / -1 )

A few folks seem angry that they were ripped off.....yes it happen in Japan...no place is immune. But if you honestly think petty theft happens as much as in most western countries.....maybe you are in that Japan hate mode some get stuck in. I am not a Japan apologist by any means but let's not be all...."they have just as much crime" blah blah. I can count the crimes in my hometown of less than 80,000 with more crime than the entire city of Tokyo...of countless millions. Even the FBI crime list agrees with me so.......I would much rather leave a wallet in Starbucks Tokyo on the average than leave 25 cents any where in my hometown. Or leave a bike...or get robbed...or pickpocketed...or jumped.... Those of us from tough areas love Japans "relative" safety.

That said its crazy how coming back from Japan and you actually hear adults letting kids listen to adult oriented things when the kid DO understand. And the kids sing it! I just sit their dumbfounded....just like that first time I walked into fasion outlet in Yokohama with demure pretty young ladies very polite....with gangsta rap just blaring....that first time it happens your mind just can't put the two together haha!

0 ( +0 / -0 )

I believe I said working life.

As in, "the life."

Whoosh again.

-3 ( +0 / -3 )

@tessa: I am going to be kind here and assume that you don't do that for a living. I have never in my working life poured a drink for a man, and I hope I never do.

For a living? No. But as Strangerland and Fishy said, there is nothing wrong with filling your colleagues' glasses. They do the same for me. I have realized that getting over your cultural biases helps a lot in establishing long-lasting and mutually enjoyable relationships, be it at work or otherwise.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

Re-read. I believe I said working life.

like Strangerland.. that won't change my comment, either.

If someone says I should pour a drink because I'm a woman, I might get offended but in my entire life in Japan, it has not happened to me.

again, there's nothing wrong pouring drinks for people (I don't want to say pour a drink for a man because I do the same exact thing for women, too).

3 ( +4 / -1 )

You know you're in Japan too long when ...

The hometown you hated growing up seems like heaven now.

2 ( +5 / -3 )

You know you’re in Japan when…

You get off the plane and see signs in Japanese.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

You know you're in Japan when you finally realize that you don't know enough math to count all the mask-wearers you're bound to see while out and about. And you know you've been in Japan too long when you begin to can't take it anymore; you begin to despise the mask-wearers and look down on them as weak little sheep.

-2 ( +2 / -4 )

Readers, no more Japan-bashing please. It's petty.

You know you've been in Japan too long when you spend all your timing whining about Japan, rather than enjoying the positive points about the country.

0 ( +6 / -6 )

Haha, Strangerland. I hear you. However, there is a theory that those who complain have not actually been here long enough to appreciate the positive points about the country :) Whatever the theory or the reason for whining though some people just like to complain, and their glass will always be half empty.

0 ( +3 / -3 )

However, there is a theory that those who complain have not actually been here long enough to appreciate the positive points about the country :)

When they talk about the stages of culture shock it's something like honeymoon -> crash -> equilization. So maybe you are right - these people just haven't reached the third stage.

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

I appreciate the positive points, as well as recognising the bad

2 ( +2 / -0 )

When..... you wait a good 3 to 5 seconds after the Traffic Signal turns Red before crossing the road.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

Well at busy intersections that makes sense. Lots of taxis run red lights

0 ( +0 / -0 )

When.... you go to buy a clothes washer and dryer and find few choices for dryers.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

The Japanese are known for their deft multitasking skills ah I think theyre getting multitasking confused with multiple people, I saw 5 guys measuring a sign today , 2 doing the work the other 3 showing there support, just a few days before that was at the cake shop had 4 girls at the counter, one getting the cake, one passing the bag, one wrapping the cake, one working the cash register. probably only enough work for two people. thats when I know im in Japan

1 ( +2 / -1 )

When you see people unashamedly parking in handicap spaces. (Nougata, Fukuoka)

There were two available spaces for the handicapped but they were consistently occupied for a solid hour by non- handicapped people

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Waving until out of sight also happens in some European countries.

Green tea ice cream is also a thing here in California, although not as much as in Japan.

Being paranoid about valuables is an especially American thing. Our European relatives are not nearly as worried about their valuables, or about the safety of their babies and children, as we Americans. I read a story about a couple from the Old Country who left their baby in a stroller on the sidewalk while they went shopping in a big store. The police were called, and they were arrested when they came back outside. The consulate had to get involved. The police agreed to release them if they would agree to go back to their home country right away. Sometimes we see movies from the Old Country in which people leave their babies unattended in strollers while they go into a shop. The idea of anyone hurting children is so foreign to them that it is unimaginable.

I have noticed that in Japanese restaurants here in the states that the restrooms tend to be kept immaculate. Thank you for that.

Thank goodness I don't have to listen to the Carpenters every day!!!!

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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