new products

100-hour chicken curry

22 Comments

MCC Foods is marketing boil-in-bag instant curry cooked for over 100 hours using sauteed vegetables, chicken broth and packaged with high quality Tajima chicken thighs from Hyogo. Price: 388 yen.

© Japan Today

©2021 GPlusMedia Inc.


22 Comments
Login to comment

They should have used a pressure cooker. Then it only would have taken 30 hours.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

I cooked my curry in an hour.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

They did use a pressure cooker. Otherwise it would have taken 300 hours.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

high quality Tajima chicken thighs from Hyogo

So are we talking happy, free-range, organic, hormone-free birds here? Or yer usual pack-em-in-as-tight-as-you-can factory-'farmed' what-does-it-matter-as-long-as-it's-cheap industrial beakless broiler that it was a mercy to slaughter?

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Bag O' MSG No thank you.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Cleo - Thanks for ruining my appetite once again.

"Bag O'MSG"

How do you know there's MSG in it? It's not made by Ajinomoto...

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Once for a party an Indian came to my house and prepared curry -- and it was one of the best I've ever tasted. There was indeed a lot of preparation involved beforehand, although he managed to make it look easy. I think the curry was on the stove for about four hours, during which time the ingredients like tomato and cauliflower became an indistinguishable part of the mixture. I doubt if the taste would have improved much by cooking it for an additional 96 hours.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Don't mention it Sarge. Just let your conscience be your guide.

:-)

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Beel - Could you give us that Indian dude's number? I sure would like him to come to my place to cook Indian curry. I've made "Indian" curry using Sharwood's Tikka Masala curry paste and peas and potatos, and while it's not bad at all, it just doesn't taste as good as the curry made by the hole-in-the-wall Indian restaurant down the street...

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Sarge - The party was when I was still with my first wife, around 1979. I've probably still got some petrified leftovers in a tupperware container embedded in the deep freeze. You're welcome to it but first I'll have to find an ice pick with which to extract it.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

I can guess the age of some of the posters here. I have a good recipe for an Indian curry using the korean bean paste Kotujan. Mix that with the curry powder you buy from the indian stores.I've tasted authentic Indian food in India and I am not sure that they keep it on the fire for 100 hours.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

"chicken thighs"

I prefer the thigh meat to the breast meat myself.

womanforwomen - You're also a womanformen! Kotujan, eh? Thanks for the tip - I'll try it!

Beel, find that icepick!

0 ( +0 / -0 )

The chef in my favourite Indian restaurant doesn't use anything called 'curry powder'. The idea is to create your own combination of chili, cumin, coriander, fenugreek, cardamon, turmeric, ginger, garlic, onions and whatever else you think goes with whatever is in your recipe. My slow-cooker (all-day) veggie curry is to die for.

I only wish I could make a passable copy of his naan....

0 ( +0 / -0 )

I usually start by frying chili first. To each his own.

Cleo, I think that I agree. Curry is heavily based on experience and creativity.

Folks, don't forget the stock, fruit and etcetera.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

It is still Japanese curry - quite unrelated to anything from the Indian sub-continent.

Spicy Indian food looks like it will never catch on in Japan. Kare Raisu is always advertised as though it comes from France or Italy; a connection I have never quite grasped.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Kare Raisu apparently became popularized by the Imperial Japanese Navy in the late Meiji era, as a way of cutting down on scurvy among sailors (carrots and potatoes provided the vitamin C). Another of the ingredients back then was frog meat, which may explain any tenuous ties to France. There are shops along the main drag outside Yokosuka Chuo Station that claim they replicate the original navy recipe.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

I'm pretty sure my local Indian cook their curry for a week, Friday's curry is a lot better than the Monday curry.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Add the kotujan and curry powder directly to the chicken first, so that the flavor is absorbed well. Rest you can do your own creative way.

Try frying the onions first and then the chillie and the spices.

The basic ingredients in the curry powder are coriander seeds, dill seeds, turmeric. Chilli is added only if you want to make the curry spicy. Other condiments such as black pepper, mustard seeds, and other pulses and herbs are added depending on the vegetable, fish or meat that goes into the curry.So there is a huge variety of curries. Chicken curry alone has so many variations.

The spices really do help to combat microbes. Wise choice Jnavy. But frogs, I don't think. ugh..

I love to host dinners so come over for a tasty meal!

0 ( +0 / -0 )

I found that adding Mascarpone cheese to curry powders gave me the consistency and creaminess that I find in most Indian curries.Tastes great in curry.Got the Jalapenos,Serranos,Coriander and Holy Basil growing well in the front garden too. :)

0 ( +0 / -0 )

I often cook (my own style) curry and it takes me less than half an hour. I got used to it. Throw a handful of raisins in the mixture as well. Curry cooked for 100 hours...I find it hard to believe, but that's what it says on the package. A 100 hours...One's digestive tract will have difficulty fishing any nutrients out of this stuff. In fact, the consistency and appearance must resemble the stuff that has already passed one's digestive system. It might smell like curry though.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Ah: Actually, Japanese curry was developed by Indian immigrants. Certainly not as diverse or sophisticated as Indian curry or even similar in taste, but to say it's unrelated is inaccurate.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

My mum has been making this kind of stuff for 40 years. 100 hour boiled broccoli, 100 hour boiled cabbage, 100 hour roast beef. I think everything she puts in the oven stays there that long.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Login to leave a comment

Facebook users

Use your Facebook account to login or register with JapanToday. By doing so, you will also receive an email inviting you to receive our news alerts.

Facebook Connect

Login with your JapanToday account

User registration

Articles, Offers & Useful Resources

A mix of what's trending on our other sites