new products

100% pure Australian honey

32 Comments

High-quality Australian honey brands Mallee and Red Stringybark are now available online for customers in Japan.

Mallee is a eucalyptus tree prevalent throughout the drier regions of Australia. The honey is light in color with a smooth, thick consistency. In the cooler weather, it tends to candy quickly due to the high glucose levels. A delicious honey for use in beverages or on crumpets.

Stringybark honey is known for its stronger, darker texture. It is a great everyday honey, and is superb for cooking as it adds extra flavor and froths naturally when heated - ideal for cakes.

And don't forget the health benefits of honey. While empty calories from refined sugar (which is depleted of anything good) contributes to a plethora of health problems, a tablespoon of honey dissolved in water taken 10 minutes before exercise, is able to reduce fat. (The honey informs the brain to take the glucose from the fat and not from your muscle.)

Buy 1 kg (1x 500gm Mallee, 1 x 500gm Red Stringybark) for 1,785 yen (plus postage) For further details, visit www.karentokyo.com/ja/honey

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32 Comments
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I tried Japanese honey when I was there and it was truly awful. Maybe there were better brands, but generic honey here in Australia is FAR better than the honey I bought in the supermarket in Japan. Those who say there's no difference between one honey and another either have no tastebuds or they've never actually tried a real variety of different honeys. Good grief - there's a huge difference between say Leatherwood honey and Blue Flower honey. And New Zealand Manuka honey; utterly different again.

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I see the karentokyo HP now has the delivery price (525 yen) on the front page. Looks like a company that listens to its customers! It also says in red that consumer tax is included in the 1785 price.

Now all we need to know is what jessssicaa is talking about....

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Buckwheat honey is very nice indeed. And you can get proper honey here, a lot more of these little organic shops are producing it. no, not cheap, buut there is a 100 times more selection now, than there was back in the "One size fits all" days.

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Honey is honey. Paying more for 'premium' honey is absurd.

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All honey is exactly the same

wrong

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Cleo: Runny honey is honey that does not contain crystals, this can be because the variety of honey does not crystalise naturally at room temperature (usually honeys with lower glucose levels) or because the honey has been overheated and over processed. Sometimes syrup and even water is added to the product, affecting its crystalization. Creamed honey is honey that has undergone controlled crystalisation resulting in lots of small crystals in the honey. This is still able to be spread and is the "proper honey" you refer to. Once the small crystals exist in the honey it is stable unless heated above 30C or so and the crystals melt. Most (but not all) NZ honey in Japan is creamy honey. Check out www.comvita-jpn.com but the prices are as you say not cheap.

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Thank you, carlos!

(Makes this Aussie honey look cheap though, dunnit?)

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CLEO: Small honey shop in Ushigome Yanagicho with great kiwi honey. I bought Southern Raita honey and its HARD and Great! http://pbees.jp/scb/shop/shop.cgi?No=421

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A bit of advice for karentokyo.

If you want people to buy your product, tell them the price up front.

I went to the HP, read about how wonderful this honey was, and tempted, hit the [purchase] button. I was asked for my credit card details, personal details etc etc - but there was no indication of how much the total order would cost. 1,785 yen + consumption tax (easy to work out) + shipping costs within Japan (could be anything from a nominal fee to over 1,000 yen). I didn't buy.

You can't ask people to pay without telling them how much they are going to pay. If you want orders, you're going to have to put the full price up front.

Sarge, that 'perfectly good Japanese honey' you're buying for 500-600 yen a kilo is no such thing - not perfectly good, and not Japanese. 100% Japanese honey will set you back around 800-1000 yen for a medium-sized (500gm?) jar in a countryside JA, probably much more in a posh department store.

A question for honey experts. When I was a kid in the UK, we had what we called 'runny honey' and 'proper honey'. 'Runny honey' is what seems to be the only type available in these forn parts. 'Proper honey' is thick, and pale in colour; when you take out a spoonful, the shape of the spoon is left in the remaining honey. Can anyone tell me how this kind of honey is made, and where(if) I can get it in Japan?

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The simple people who say "honey is honey" and "rice is rice" and "wine is wine" live in a narrow little world. There are multitudes of all types of living things or things derived from living things. From "natto" to "sake" to "edamame" to "eggs", there are varieties that we don't even know about. The problem is that very few get to savour them all.

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Sarge, suggest you check the country of origin on the honey. 95% of the honey on sale in Japan is from China, 100% Japanese honey is not particularly cheap. Whether Chinese honey is "perfectly good" is debatable. It has been banned from the US, Canada and the UK in recent years for antibiotic levels (the ban no longer exists). The the issue with importing honey for sale in Japan is the 25.5% duty for pure honey. Hence the website seems to be making the sale in Australia and posting it in (I did not see the postage rate on the website, but assume this is the case).

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jess - Why exactly shouldn't we buy it ( aside from the high price )?

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jessssicaaa

Why not? I'm a honey lover. What's wrong with these brands?

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Take it from an australian. (me) Dont buy it ;D

You have been warned ^^

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As I'm a honey addict, I will definitely try this new one. As it is ideal for cakes, I will try it in my Armenian Honey Cakes' preparation.

If you guys wanna know how to prepare an Armenian Honey Cake, here is the recip : dough: 75 g margarine, 3 eggs, 125 g sugar, 1 sachet vanilla flavored sugar (this is about 3 tsp), 3 tbsp whipping cream, 150 g flour, 1/2 sachet baking powder (this is approximately 2 tsp)

almond crust: 100g margarine, 80 g sugar, 80 g honey, 2 tbsp whipping cream, 150 g almond slices, 1/2 tsp cinnamon

Preheat oven to 175 degrees celsius. Melt the magarine in a little pot and let cool down a bit. Beat eggs, sugar and vanilla sugar until frothy. Combine with margarine and whipping cream. Then fold in flour, combined with baking powder. Put dough into a greased cake tin and bake in the hot oven for 10 minutes. Meanwhile melt the second part of the margarine in a pot, put in sugar, honey, whipping cream, almond slices and cinnamon. Bring to a boil, then take away from heat and pour onto the dough base. Bake for another 15 minutes. Take the cake out of the oven and the tin and leave to cool on a wire rack.

By the way my favourite Honey is Attiki (Greek Honey, from Thyme and other flora). Try this one too ! Bon appetit!

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1 kg for 1,785 yen plus postage? And what's the postage? Another 1,500 yen? Heck, that's more than six times what I pay for perfectly good Japanese honey.

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Orange blossom honey is my favorite but it can be very expensive. You can definitely taste a flowery orange flavor. But now I just stick to the splenda honey. One of the best inventions was sugarless bees.

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All honey is exactly the same

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Honey has a different taste and other characteristics depending on the nectar source (flower). Buckwheat honey for example is black in color and has a strong taste. Honey in Japanese supermarkets tends to be liquid honey from China (95% of the market), over processed at high temperatures with pollen filtered out and oftentimes diluted with syrup. Darker honeys have strong antioxidant activity. Manuka honey from NZ is known for its antibacterial activity and its ability to assist with H.Prilori, the bacteria linked to stomach ulcers. It is also used to heal wounds.

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Honey, like beer and wine, has many varieties. People who say it's all the same need to get out more, as this is just not true. Japan has honey stores here and there along the country roads. You can taste and see the difference. I recommend the experience.

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Honey is honey, it's all the same.

Don't believe the marketers.

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Japan does make good quality honey, just a bit expensive. The honey they sell in the supermarket is mainly from China. The best honey comes from Germany, France and Greece....I am addicted to good quality honey and the Australian couldn't really convince me.

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I'm not a big honey lover but I do like it as a salad dressing with lemon juice. Pity the linked site doesn't include some recipes for using honey in cooking.

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alphawolf has obviously never tasted honey from a variety of sources. Shame, you might appreciate the different flavours.

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Honey is honey.. no reason to buy this unless you are from Austrailia. As far as allergies from pollen, if you eat honey produced locally, it will help with any seasonal allergies since the local bees digest the local pollen. This Austrailian honey won't help you in this area.

aw

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i'll take the leatherwood honey but definitely pass on the vegemite.

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that is right.Once you have had leatherwood you don't want anything else. smashing stuff..fortunately I have some at home.Crumpets I was never THAT keen on.

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yeah....I could really murder a few hot crumpets smeared with leatherwood honey. Nearly as good as vegemite.

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I wish it was available in stores, as well as online.

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I miss Australian honey but I'm not sure the Japanese public would think much of it. The honey available in Japan is boring, it's just sugary. Australian honey is hard to describe but it is more complex and has a sort of mild sourness or bitterness to it.

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Oh gosh Cleo, tell me about it! I was fantasising about toasted cheese crumpets t'other day...

Sound like a nice pair of honeys...

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A delicious honey for use in beverages or on crumpets.

So when's someone going to start selling the crumpets, then?

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