The "Aquarium LED Lamp" realizes light similar to sunlight. Photo: KYOCERA
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Kyocera develops LED lamp for growing coral, waterweed in aquarium

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By Norio Matsumoto

Kyocera Corp has released an LED lamp that realizes light similar to sunlight for aquariums. With the Aquarium LED Lamp, it becomes possible to artificially reproduce natural light environment suited for growing coral and waterweed in an aquarium. The price of the lamp is about ¥100,000.

As light sources for growing corals and waterweed in aquariums, metal halide lamps have been used. But they are being replaced with LED lamps because the production volume of metal halide lamps is expected to decrease and for the purpose of cutting electricity bills.

However, with the lights of conventional LED lamps, it is not possible to grow living organisms sensitive to light environment such as corals well. Conventional LED lamps use light source devices combining blue LEDs and yellow phosphors and, therefore, have a spectrum greatly different from that of sunlight.

Some LED lamps use multiple LED chips with different colors as light source devices to reproduce light similar to sunlight. However, it is difficult to evenly apply the light because multiple high-directivity light source devices with different colors need to be arranged.

This time, Kyocera developed the Ceraphic technology to produce light similar to sunlight with one light source device. The company realized it by combining purple LEDs and red, green and blue phosphors.

"We have commercialized a technology that realizes almost the same spectrum as that of sunlight with one light source device for the first time in the world," the company said.

It can reproduce not only sunlight on the Earth's surface but also sunlight in the sea.

© Nikkei Technology Online

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3 Comments
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Awesome

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https://www.kyocera.co.jp/prdct/led-lighting/ceraphic/emission/

the red is too strong for a reef tank, a reef tank is too shallow, in the sea most of the red light gets absorbed by sea water, the light that reaches the corals in the wild isnt the same light that plants need.

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what is the color temperature and wavelength?

100000 for a lamp is expensive,and most people dont want any red light in a reef tank, can you change the red intensity?

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