Photo: grape SHOP
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Kernels slide off like butter with this Japanese corn peeler

12 Comments
By grape Japan

Corn is sweet and delicious.

It can be eaten all year round, but the best time to eat it is when it's harvested. In the United States, for example, that varies between mid-summer and late fall, and in Japan, it's between June and September. Those of you in the southern hemisphere may need to wait a few more months, but for many of our readers, just about now's the perfect time of year to enjoy some delicious corn.

Although you may love eating sweet corn, there are two things that many people find inconvenient about it. For starters, pieces can get stuck between your teeth when you're eating corn directly from the cob, which is both uncomfortable and potentially unsightly. Also, when it comes to making corn salad, corn soup, or other dishes, getting those kernels off the cob can be somewhat of a hassle. If you're using a knife, it's not easy to get it just right, and you're either left with kernels with tough parts still attached if you cut too deep or half-cut kernels if you cut too shallow, which could result in wasted food.

If you've ever hesitated for such reasons when you pass by the corn in the supermarket or greengrocer, this remarkable Japanese corn peeler could be just the thing you need.

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Photo: grape SHOP

This Japanese corn peeler is a super-convenient tool that can effortlessly remove kernels from the cob. In fact, they come off so smoothly, you'd almost think the kernels were made of butter.

It will turn what once was a hassle into an enjoyable experience.

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Photo: grape SHOP

Made of stainless steel and manufactured in Tsubame-Sanjo, Niigata Prefecture, a region famous throughout Japan for high-quality metal works, the Poro Corn Peeler is slim and takes up very little space so you don't have to worry about where to store it.

It's so easy to use! Just slide the peeler downward from the top of the cob along the base of the kernels.

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Photo: grape SHOP

The specially designed serrated blade lets you effortlessly remove corn kernels from the cob. The size of the blade covers one or two rows of kernels, so you can peel only as much as you need.

A writer at our sister site Grape took the Poro Corn Peeler home to try it for himself. First, he set the edge of the blade at the base of the kernels at the top of the cob.

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Photo: grape SHOP

Next, he just applied some gentle pressure, pushing down against the core of the cob.

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Photo: grape SHOP

The tool just went in... Smooth like butter. The rest was easy, the kernels showing almost no resistance as he slid the tool along.

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Photo: grape SHOP

And this is what it looked like when he was done.

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It's such a pleasure to see the kernels slide off so easily!

Just to compare, he tried it with unboiled corn, but it didn't work very well. This peeler is definitely recommended for corn that's been boiled.

Once the kernels are removed, you can use them for corn salads, corn soup, fried corn any other kind of dish you have in mind.

So why not try using this tool to take the hassle out of eating corn and removing corn for your cooking. You'll also get hooked on the amazingly smooth way it removes kernels from the cob.

Check out the Poro corn peeler at grape SHOP. We use WorldShopping Global. The grape SHOP page is in Japanese, but if you see the WorldShopping widget appear at the bottom of the page, that product can be shipped overseas.

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© grape Japan

©2022 GPlusMedia Inc.

12 Comments
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This is a great idea, as a home canner of garden grown corn, I know how wasteful it is to use a regular knife to remove the kernels from the cob.

I plan on ordering several, as they will make much appreciated gifts for my corn growing friends!

-1 ( +3 / -4 )

Unfortunately it is not available outside of Japan...

-3 ( +0 / -3 )

Danielsan,

Just that brand. These have been around a century. Just check Amazon on the USA site for "Corn Cob Peeler".

4 ( +5 / -1 )

Daiso version coming soon 100 yen :-)

5 ( +6 / -1 )

Unfortunately it is not available outside of Japan..

It is if you shop using Buyee. I buy lots of cool Japanese products through them.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

It is real hard to find sweet tiny kernel corn here. Most corn here I would consider pig corn in the states. Some of the corn here would be rejected by pigs anywhere around the world.

This country is not corn culture. As a matter of fact not fresh vegetable culture. They don’t even like broccoli and cauliflower raw. What is with that?

Healthiest way to eat vegetables.

That tool has some other good purposes though like removing hard cement grout or even silicon grout. It works. Sort of like a plexiglass cutter.

I recommend it to be part of your tool collection.

-6 ( +0 / -6 )

Funny thing, I was given teeth with which to get the corn off the cob and into my mouth. Call me lo tech but it works well and is very satisfying.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

there are many posters on JT who don’t even have teeth, youngster

Then I would suggest they have bigger issues than getting corn off a cob. Get some dental implants may be an idea. Or a sturdy set of false teeth for the elderly. Work on oral hygiene for sure.

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

When you get to 70-80 years you usually don't have many teeth left. Even with dental hygiene.

Both of my parents had good teeth. My mother retained all of her teeth until she passed at 89 and my father had most of his teeth (had a plate with two false teeth) until he passed at 82. Most elderly I know here have most of their own teeth so oral hygiene is important and beneficial in the long term.

I dont know if it is the food there or lack of oral maintenance but it is not normal for people to lose all or most of their teeth when they take the proper daily care.

Interesting to see such a big difference in two first world nations.

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

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