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Make an impression on paper and your peers with a katana-hilt name stamp

6 Comments
By Meg Murphy, RocketNews24

A lot of newcomers to Japan are baffled by the custom of using hanko, or name stamps, in place of a signature for everything from opening a bank account to signing a rental agreement for an apartment, but it is a custom that is very deep-rooted in the culture. A hanko (also called an inkan) is a cylindrical-shaped stamp made from wood, plastic, or even bull’s horn, with a person’s family name carved into one end. When “signing” an important contract or document, one presses their stamp onto a pad of red ink and then makes an impression on the document.

More often than not, people will carry just a plain black, white, or wooden stamp, though most stamp-making shops offer other, more colorful options. But if you’re looking for something that will leave an impression on more than just paper, ONdesign, the same company that brought you the samurai sword stick shift, now offers original Sengoku-in, or “Warring States stamps”. The stamps are wrapped in the same manner as a katana’s hilt and available in five different colors.

There are also four different font types to choose from to make your stamp even more personalized. Up to three kanji characters or five alphabetical letters can be carved onto the seal.

The sword-handle design offers a much easier grip than the standard, smooth-surfaced stamp. Plus, when you bust it out, people will know you mean business! The stamp is available for order at ONdesign’s online store for 5,800 yen plus tax. A special gift set is also available, which includes a special carrying case with covered ink pad for 8,200 yen.

Source: ONdesign via Japaaan Magazine

Read more stories from RocketNews24. -- More cat stamps available so you can neko-fy all of your important life documents -- Mr. Hanko is here! Bringing life to your name stamp and joy to your office -- Create personalised stamps in a minute with new ink stamp vending machine!

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6 Comments
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Plus, when you bust it out, people will know you mean business!

More likely they will think the exact opposite.

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If you register your hanko at your local city hall, you can use it as your official signature on documents, contracts, and such.

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As nice as it sounds, all I can think of is that it makes forgery much much easier. All they need is to remake another hanko or 3D print one then, they are in business. So, I will leave this as a niche.

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Well, good hankos are hand-carved. When you register yours, they keep a copy on file, it's like a fingerprint, and can be used to prove whether the one in question is legit

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Plus, when you bust it out, people will know you mean business!

More likely they will think the exact opposite

Indeed, I imagine this would have the same impact as signing with a quill pen would in the US or the UK.

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"...As nice as it sounds, all I can think of is that it makes forgery much much easier. All they need is to remake another hanko or 3D print one then, they are in business. So, I will leave this as a niche..."

No, it doesn't. You're not in East-Asia, obviously, and you know nothing. It is not a niche. Hundreds of millions of people use hanko. You are ignorant and your opinion is worthless. I have spoken!

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