Photo: grape SHOP
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Whoever said 'the best thing since sliced bread' should have bought this foolproof Japanese slicer

16 Comments
By grape Japan

Those who really enjoy bread may have a bread machine at home. Especially in Japan, where small apartments often prevent the installation of proper ovens, bread machines (known in Japan as "home bakery" machines) are sometimes the only way to make homemade bread.

Although enjoying freshly baked bread from a bread machine is a pleasure, there's one part of the experience that can potentially be annoying, and that's ending up with uneven slices when you try to slice your bread.

A writer at our sister site Grape bought a bread machine but she was often disappointed that she had to settle for slices looking like this.

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"I have a bread machine, but the cross-sections never look neat," said the writer. "I bought a bread knife, but when I cut the loaf of bread by hand, the slices tend to be uneven in thickness. Moreover, the less bread there is left, the harder it is to cut!"

Fortunately, now there's a powerful ally that can help you solve both these problems, and more.

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Photo: grape SHOP

It's a bread slicer perfect for loaves of bread baked in bread machines. You can slice freshly baked bread neatly every time. Just like this. Our writer at Grape was lucky enough to try this gadget for herself.

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"What a difference! I was able to cut even the crusts so cleanly."

Let's take a closer look and see how it works.

Slices bread perfectly every time with "slanted cut" design

To see how easy it is to use this slicer, the writer first tried cutting bread as usual with her bread knife.

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This is what happened when she sliced the loaf placed upright on the counter.

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As you can see, it turned out to be uneven and even a bit messy looking.

That's where the "Bread Slicer with hood" comes in! The feature of this slicer is that it slices bread like this. Placing the loaf this way makes it more stable and easier to slice in the machine.

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This should help you slice your bread to the ideal thickness. So, now it's time to actually put it to the test.

A convenient slicer with adjustable thickness

The cutting guide of the slicer can be adjusted in five steps from 1 cm to 3 cm, allowing you to use it in different ways, from thin sandwiches to thick toast.

It can handle loaves of bread up to about 20 cm in height and 40 cm in width, which is a great size for larger loaves from bread machines.

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Photo: grape SHOP

First, insert the plastic adjustment panel to the thickness you want to cut, and place your loaf of bread in the slicer.

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Photo: grape SHOP

Once you've put your bread knife through the slit, cut the bread by holding it down and moving the knife straight and carefully.

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Photo: grape SHOP

"It was a little tricky to move the knife at first, but it was easy to hold the bread in place and slice it after I got the hang of it," the writer said. "Here is the bread I cut! The thickness was even, and the cross-section was beautiful and even."

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Photo: grape SHOP

"I tried it at different thicknesses. I can't believe how beautifully it slices... It's just like bread from the store," the writer said.

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Photo: grape SHOP

You can easily change the thickness, so you'll be able to expand your options and try different things.

Easy to clean: It can also be used as a bread box

In addition to comfort, another concern is how to clean the machine after use. This home bakery slicer keeps bread crumbs underneath to prevent clutter, and the removable bottom plate makes it easy to dispose of crumbs.

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Photo: grape SHOP

It comes with a hood, so after using it as a slicer, you can use it directly as a bread box.

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Photo: grape SHOP

It can be used for homemade bread as well as unsliced store-bought bread.

"Personally, I wanted to use it for the fluffy, high-quality bread sold in specialty stores," admitted the writer. It's also recommended for people who don't own a bread machine!

Once you try the versatile and convenient "Bread Slicer with Hood," you'll surely think it's the best thing since sliced bread!

Check out the Bread Slicer with Hood at grape SHOP. (We use WorldShopping Global. The grape SHOP page is in Japanese, but if you see the WorldShopping widget appear at the bottom of the page, that product can be shipped overseas).

Read more stories from grape Japan.

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-- Fake goldfish swim in cute vases evoking a scene from Japanese summer festivals

-- Garden eel fans will love this clever key case with eel that extends to life size for unlocking duties

© grape Japan

©2021 GPlusMedia Inc.

16 Comments
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3000 ¥ ?

Way too much expensive !

4 ( +4 / -0 )

Bread knife is cheaper. Also this new product isn't useful for seeded wholemeal, sourdough, rye bread.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

From the look of the slices in the picture of the bread in the bread box, you'd be better off just slicing it yourself.

8 ( +8 / -0 )

Nothing new... There are a lot of thing like that on Amazon On the photos, it's look like they didn't use their "inventions" for cutting the bread... Electric one like those used by butcher are way better

4 ( +4 / -0 )

The first problem is the bread itself.

nepal:

seeded wholemeal, sourdough, rye bread.

Now we're talking.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

Yes - if most bread was not like doughy Chiffon cake then slicing may well be easier.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

'As Seen On TV. Call 1-800-RITE-NOW and you'll get this special ginsu knife set FREE! ' .

Still, you might never know until you try one.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

It's just like bread from the store

I thought the whole point of homemade bread was that it's better than bread from the store?

5 ( +5 / -0 )

Those who really enjoy bread may have a bread machine at home. Especially in Japan, where small apartments often prevent the installation of proper ovens, bread machines (known in Japan as "home bakery" machines) are sometimes the only way to make homemade bread.

Totally disagree. Making bread by hand is easy and fun. I make bread every other day in a stainless steel bowl. I bake in a small electric oven which can be bought for about ¥7,000. I tend not to make regular shapes so my bread would not fit in this slicer. Wholewheat bread and sometimes rye. I buy 25 kg bags of flour from Mamapan. My bread is very popular with the neighbours and definitely better than the store.

I make the crust soft because the wife has a problem with cutting these days.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

I brought a ginsu to Japan. It really does slice bread easily.

I also eat mushrooms every day. Seaweeds and dashi broths. Tofu. Bonito flakes. Tomatoes.

-3 ( +0 / -3 )

Can't cut bread with a Ginsu.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Ginsu can cut a sneaker and then slice bread as thin as paper

-4 ( +0 / -4 )

Ginsu can cut a sneaker and then slice bread as thin as paper

Does that add some flavour to the bread? Cut sneakers?

4 ( +4 / -0 )

I find the knife after cutting through a rubber sole adds some density to the bread, so the texture is an enhancement.

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

I found it helps to let the steam escape from bread machine bread before you cut it. When still hot, it will just collapse under the knife.

Panasonic bread machines make really good mochi rice cakes. Beautifully smooth and chewy.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

They are obviously cack handed if they can’t cut a neat slice of bread. Mind you I have never met a woman who can, not even home economists which did surprise me!

Panasonic bread makers make excellent bread, just leave out the majority of ingredients in the recipe book! All you need is salt, yeast, flour and water. Agree you need to leave to cool before slicing.

Wholemeal is my preferred but happily scoff all the others!

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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