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Are COVID-19 boosters ethical, with half the world waiting for a first shot?

10 Comments
By Nancy S Jecker

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[C]ritics argue that vaccines are not owned by anyone, even by the pharmaceutical companies that develop them. Instead, they represent the final part of product development that is years in the making and the result of many people’s labors.

By that logic, Dr. Jecker, your shiny expensive Subaru should probably not be considered your property. It would be best given to someone living on the streets of Seattle. Or Johannesburg. Best that you are nnot one of the "critics," isn't it?

Moreover, most COVID-19 vaccines were publicly funded, principally by governments using taxpayer dollars.

So taxpayers own the stuff?

US taxpayers own the vaccine? I haven't followed the question over whether the U.S. Congress agrees to hand over the rights of ownership on behalf of citizens. I haven't heard of anything being duly passed and sent to the president for signature.

EU citizens own the vaccine? From what is evident coming from the EU, lawmakers uniformly appear not to agree with handing over the IP rights owned by European corporations on behalf of their own taxpaying citizens.

In fact, hasn't the WHO actually endorsed manufacturing the vaccines under license by the rights holders, in manufacturing facilities in multiple countries around the globe?

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Corrected post:

[C]ritics argue that vaccines are not owned by anyone, even by the pharmaceutical companies that develop them. Instead, they represent the final part of product development that is years in the making and the result of many people’s labors.

By that logic, Dr. Jecker, your shiny expensive Subaru (just a guess) should probably not be considered your property. It would be best given to someone living on the streets of Seattle. Or Johannesburg. Best that you are not one of the "critics," isn't it?

Moreover, most COVID-19 vaccines were publicly funded, principally by governments using taxpayer dollars.

So taxpayers own the stuff?

US taxpayers own the vaccine? I haven't followed the question over whether the U.S. Congress agreed to hand over the rights of ownership on behalf of citizens. I haven't heard of anything being duly passed and sent to the president for signature.

EU citizens own the vaccine? From what is evident coming from the EU, lawmakers uniformly appear not to agree with handing over the IP rights owned by European corporations on behalf of their own taxpaying citizens.

In fact, hasn't the WHO actually endorsed manufacturing the vaccines under license by the rights holders, in manufacturing facilities in multiple countries around the globe?

1 ( +2 / -1 )

It has nothing to do with ethics.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

The developed world provided the funds, the scientists and the knowledge; it's only fair that such countries take care of their populations first.

Why does the developed world have to support and give aid of every kind to poor countries when the governments of those places always keep whatever is given to them for the local elite?

3 ( +4 / -1 )

Ethics are a hugely difficult thing to decide, specially on world scale problems, but nobody can negate that vaccines being used for minimum gains as boosters instead of giving immunity to those that need them is wrong, not to mention that those countries can become nests for new variants.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Does India need the "vaccine"? 14% vaccination rate 32,000 new cases with 1.3 BILLION PEOPLE. A country that lives in close quarters with others, a very dirty place rampant with various diseases, and ripe for a complete pandemic of hundreds of millions of cases if not more. Compare that with the U.S. 55% vaccination rate, 134,000 new cases with a 1/4 of the population. A country with the highest standard of living in the world.

The numbers dont add up. Whatever India is doing, the rest of the world needs to follow.

INDIA 14% VACCINATION RATE 32,000 NEW CASES 1.3 BILLION PEOPLE

U.S.A 55% VACCINATION RATE 134,000 NEW CASES 330 MILLION PEOPLE.

Am I missing something?

3 ( +5 / -2 )

"Whatever India is doing, the rest of the world needs to follow."

Yes just fudge the numbers and deny that millions of Indians died during the second wave. Why follow Indian then, China is the better model to follow.

-2 ( +2 / -4 )

The industrialized countries are in the process of donating billions of doses of vaccines. The USA alone is donating over a billion doses.

Given the number of doses that the US is giving away, free of charge, is it so wrong for our most vulnerable to be offered a booster shot?

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Why can't we do both? I don't see why we can't give our citizens boosters whilst donating to other friendly countries.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Completely bare of logic…instead of p.c. some more logical and pragmatic thinking and honesty please. If the first world gets too sick or even widely dies from no further vaccinations or boosting , they have no chances anymore there to get any vaccines, this one, amended ones or other vaccines for other diseases. So the ethical solution would be to first and only vaccinate the developing and producing first world countries and then the rest. Or do you think, they will invent and produce vaccines themselves in the jungles or Sahel zone if we all have died? Come on and stop kidding us.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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