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A century ago, anti-immigrant backlash almost closed America’s doors

12 Comments
By Matthew Smith

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The anti-immigrant American Party, or Know-Nothing ticket, did flourish in the 1850s before imploding over the issue of slavery.

MAGA should definitely rename itself to this.

Truth in advertising.

Trump even proclaimed he loves his poorly educated followers.

5 ( +10 / -5 )

No problem if people enter the US legally and obey the laws.

-12 ( +3 / -15 )

The hypocrisy of nations built from immigration that then turn on new immigrants.

0 ( +5 / -5 )

Trump even proclaimed he loves his poorly educated followers.

Yes, and the Dems don’t, this is why so many of them are waking up and after over 70 years of getting nothing for being loyal to the party, they are leaving. Whether you are educated or not, they’re still voters and Trump checkmated the Dems by going into their territory in deep states to siphon off voters, absolutely brilliant move and it’s paying off and the Dems should be absolutely terrified of what he did, he’s getting ready to go to California as soon as this trial thing is over. Losing 8% of the black vote alone would be devastating to the Democrats.

-3 ( +5 / -8 )

Good article. Seeing this is a Japan English site, the info below is related:

On November 13, 1922, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled to definitively prohibit Japanese from becoming naturalized citizens on the basis of race. This ban lasted until 1952.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

Looking back as a historian of immigration and religion, I’m struck by three changes in U.S. views of immigration over the course of the 19th century.

Ok, and while you're at it, how did some other countries' immigration policies compare to the US during that time?

-5 ( +3 / -8 )

Crikey, the Catholics are either victims or a dangerous influence.

And Protestants are so bloody boring.

Give me Rastafarian anytime.

5 ( +7 / -2 )

GBR48Today 09:29 am JST

The hypocrisy of nations built from immigration that then turn on new immigrants.

Is only matched by those that never let in immigrants in the first place and insult those who do?

1 ( +3 / -2 )

There is no right to immigrate to the US. The country is overpopulated compared to housing stock.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

I am a good immigrant. I came to this country 33 years ago. I did not sneak across the border, I entered through a legal point of entry (an airport in my case). I ate the foods and accepted the accommodations that were available. I did not demand that the Japanese diet be altered to suit my palate or religious beliefs. I learned to live within the rules of Japanese culture. I did not demand that Japanese society conform to my beliefs or preferences. I learned to obey Japanese laws, even ones that seem nonsensical to me. I have never hit nor spit on a police officer. I found and maintained employment, paid my taxes and volunteered in my community. I have never gone on welfare nor expected the Japanese government to provide me with benefits that Japanese citizens would never receive. I have always appreciated this country and have never once chanted “death to Japan” nor hoped for its destruction. Finally, one day I applied for citizenship. I got in line, paid the fees, passed the requirements and waited my turn. In other words, I acted a great deal like the immigrants who arrived at Ellis Island in the 1920’s and nothing like illegal aliens who crash the border, commit crimes, demand extra resources in exchange for protests and violence. Immigrants who do it the right way are always welcome in the US, illegal aliens who do not are not.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

Sam WattersMay 26 08:23 pm JST

illegal aliens who crash the border, commit crimes, demand extra resources in exchange for protests and violence.

You got sources that this happens at any sort of scale?

0 ( +3 / -3 )

One hundred years ago, the U.S. Congress enacted the most notorious immigration legislation in American history. Signed by President Calvin Coolidge, the Immigration Act of 1924

....and as a result, the country could unify and develop its own identity. Which is impossible with open borders. Ask the native Americans how open borders worked out for their culture.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

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