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A future of thirst: Water crisis lies on the horizon

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© 2014 AFP

©2020 GPlusMedia Inc.

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It's the 21st century and we (supposed) can't even provide water.

Sorry, I don't buy it.

Water is plentiful, ubiquitous, self-renewing and essentially unlimited.

That is a basic fact, despite what the mega-corporations who are buying it up are trying to make us believe.

-3 ( +1 / -4 )

@ Burnish Bush

I have been following this topic for sometime and I would suggest looking at pictures of the Aral Sea.

No nat resource is unlimited, all are finite. Under economic understanding anything that is unlimited and has a use would have 0 monetary value because of how plentiful it would be.

Fresh water isn't no different, while still very plentiful it still has price. And that price is still subject to market dynamics.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

Notice that this editorial has no listed author, even though it's an opinion piece. The author is merely listed as the AFP, which is just the French Press Agency that is distributing this opinion piece to various news outlets throughout the world.

Major Global Water companies, like for example the huge French multinational called the Suez Group, have their PR departments write up these types of scare stories and then distribute them to the newspapers via press agencies like the AFP.

You may think that this editorial was written by some environmental activist, think again, the author(s) name is withheld for a reason.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Aiser

The Aral Sea was drained by over farming that quickly popped up around it.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Burning Bush- your thinking reminds me of climate change thinking 30 years ago. "Yeah, some extreme liberals say it's going to happen, but really, I haven't noticed a problem yet, and what they say is just politically motivated." Now, we have all kinds of bad weather, animals dying out, crop damage, not to mention the skin cancer and eye problems brought on by the ozone layer.

Learn about desertification. It is a real problem already in many places. There is so much pollution in other places that water sources are really badly damaged.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

As a matter of science, every molecule of water on earth that is here now, will be here forever. The idea that humans are not adaptable enough to figure out how to use the available water, or to adapt to the climate change that has been going on for thousands of years is silly.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

Its not so much that water will become scarce, its that drinkable fresh water will become scarce. Think of the growing mercury content and other foreign un-natural chemicals going into rivers, lakes, and oceans (introduced by man-kind's incompetence). Nobody wants to see the day when seafood will be off limits because it will be too toxic for human consumption and that's if we don't overfish the oceans first.... Or you can't wade around in the ocean because its too toxic (red tide bacteria anyone?).

While the type of thinking that "nothing is ever going to happen to the standards of the human ecosystem of living..." because the severity of our environmental tampering has yet to reach it's ultimate climax and isn't staring the entire human race directly in the face, it would be most crucial to attempt to reduce any further changes to the natural environment and focus on counter-acting our stupidity ASAP so that future generations will not have to deal with the inability to grow crops, feed cattle, fish, or even enjoy a dip in a natural body of water.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

The Borg: "Resistance is futile" - We can do nothing to stop it (climate change), or at least reverse the damage done. The Borg: "We will adapt" - The Human race is very adaptable, we have survived many changes throughout history. Morpheus: "and after a century of war I remember that which matters most... We are still here!" - That's right people, stop the angst, stop the fear mongering, stop worrying about tomorrow. We shall survive!

1 ( +1 / -0 )

You don't know a water crisis till you've lived through El Nino in Australia. Some Australians have never seen rain!

1 ( +1 / -0 )

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