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Texas blackout: How can electricity grids weather climate shocks?

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By Jack Graham

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Another option is working with other states to share energy, in the event of power failures. Texas stands out as not having any such arrangements due to its independent power grid.

The most hilarious thing about the blackouts is seeing Republican officials in Texas' oil dominant economy trying to spin this as the fault of a yet to be enacted Green New Deal, wind turbines, environmentalism, AOC or Democratic governors.

9 ( +10 / -1 )

I was living in Texas when this passed. It was insane. E!ectric Companies appeared over night and no one needed to generate a single watt of electricity. That set the theme of reduced investments into the needed infrastructure. The 2011 event only created algorithms that had a billing bottom but no ceiling on costs. Millions were sold out for the greed of power and light. The real irony is that water is a limited resource for Texans and they destroyed that too...

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dagonToday  07:19 am JST

Another option is working with other states to share energy, in the event of power failures. Texas stands out as not having any such arrangements due to its independent power grid.

The most hilarious thing about the blackouts is seeing Republican officials in Texas' oil dominant economy trying to spin this as the fault of a yet to be enacted Green New Deal, wind turbines, environmentalism, AOC or Democratic governors.

Those self-effaced oafs can't blame these factors. They can only blame themselves for not doing their jobs. Yeah, Ted Cruz. That means YOU.

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Cancun benefits from Texan blackouts!

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Texas seems to be the center of the Dunning-Kruger Universe.

"Nobody's going to build something that's going to sit idle 99.9% of the time so it can run in an emergency period, unless they're properly compensated," he explained.

They can, they just choose not to. Clean water and reliable power are two things that governments should ensure their residents have. To not do so in the 21st century in ridiculous. It's not like Texas is a war torn area.

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Just one more example of a failed Republican leadership.

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With the mass production of lithium batteries for EV's it would not be hard to make a law for all new houses to have a 14 kwh EV battery and solar panels. The battery could ensure a two day supply of electricity when the grid fails. The solar panels could extend that duration. More difficult for high rise units but for individual dwellings it is doable. Them more houses and businesses able to self supply in emergencies the less stress for the grid. If the grid is about to fail it could send a signal to building's with backup power to switch over and get an immediate reduction in demand on the grid. Also helpful if the grid fails due to earthquake or other disasters. Time to decentralize electricity where possible.

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it would not be hard to make a law for all new houses to have a 14 kwh EV battery and solar panels.

We're talking Texas. "But, Freedom!"

I think it would actually be quite hard to make such a law. Texans aren't going to go for that. Too much government interference for Texans.

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The last two decades have proven beyond any reasonable doubt that Republicans are entirely useless when it comes to governing effectively. They are pro-whiners, and masters at obstruction. But complete and utter failures when it comes to actually finding something good to do for the people.

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With the mass production of lithium batteries for EV's it would not be hard to make a law for all new houses to have a 14 kwh EV battery and solar panels. 

Who's paying for it? Solar panel roof installations cost about $3 per watt. Batteries don't last two days either. Most will last at best half a day. Solar systems on a home that is connected to the grid are disconnected and produce no power when the grid is down. The inverters do this automatically. This is a required safety feature to protect power company workers from electrocution when working on equipment to restore power.

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StrangerlandToday  02:03 am JST

it would not be hard to make a law for all new houses to have a 14 kwh EV battery and solar panels.

We're talking Texas. "But, Freedom!"

I think it would actually be quite hard to make such a law. Texans aren't going to go for that. Too much government interference for Texans.

StrangerlandToday  02:32 am JST

The last two decades have proven beyond any reasonable doubt that Republicans are entirely useless when it comes to governing effectively. They are pro-whiners, and masters at obstruction. But complete and utter failures when it comes to actually finding something good to do for the people.

'Freedom' my fanny. What do you expect from a state where guns are the real gods?

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Who's paying for it? Solar panel roof installations cost about $3 per watt. Batteries don't last two days either.

In my country the average four person household uses between 14 KWh - 18 KWh of electricity a day. A system with say 4 KWH solar panels, 5000 watt inverter and 14 KWH battery would suffice for two days easily in an emergency. Dont use the dishwasher or washing machines or clothes dryers and other superfluous items during the emergency. Much better than freezing to death when the power from the grid goes out.

The cost is obviously paid by the person buying/building the house and will be paid off in the mortgage payments like the rest of the house. Many nations have subsidies for installing green energy on your home and the system would pay for itself well before the mortgage is paid, in saved electricity costs.

Having your own ability to generate and store power is a huge plus when selling a house and you help the planet by doing so. There is no real down side to making it a law to include in new houses and buildings and once it is law, those Texans can complain all they like, right up until they realize they are saving money and doing their bit to help the environment, but they cant not comply with the law.

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Solar systems on a home that is connected to the grid are disconnected and produce no power when the grid is down. The inverters do this automatically. This is a required safety feature to protect power company workers from electrocution when working on equipment to restore power.

Hospitals and business that have their own solar power and generators for when the grid fails, detect low or no power from the grid and switch on the generator and disconnect it (the hospital or business or home from the grid while operating. The system detects when the grid is back and reverts to using grid power and shuts off the generator. The technology is widely available and legal and in use around the world. That detecting and switch is what you need in the States. It is already in domestic use around the world.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

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