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Trump pattern is create a crisis, retreat, move on

15 Comments
By ZEKE MILLER
U.S. President Donald Trump speaks at Derco Aerospace Inc, a subsidiary of Lockheed Martin, Friday, in Milwaukee. Photo: AP

U.S. President Donald Trump was defiant and declarative Friday, with all the hammer-on-anvil subtlety that has charted a now-familiar pattern of his presidency: create a crisis, retreat, declare victory, move on.

"Not only didn't I back down, I backed up," Trump insisted. However he may phrase it, though, Trump walked away from his earlier vow to include a contentious question about citizenship on the 2020 census.

The president shifted his bulldozer of an administration into reverse, announcing that he would drop his push to seek the citizenship status of all American residents on the census, instead ordering other agencies to share data with the Department of Commerce, which oversees the decennial survey.

The face-saving measure, announced to fanfare in the Rose Garden on Thursday, underscored the president's obsession with projecting a "win" even in the face of defeat. He's demonstrated a reluctance to acknowledge even the minor missteps that have plagued his administration from its start.

After fighting in court and in the press for nearly two years to include the citizenship question, Trump this week insisted it was unnecessary because federal data-sharing would lead to more accurate results.

"We're already finding out who the citizens are and who they're not," Trump said without evidence, barely 12 hours after signing the executive order. "And I think more accurately."

Critics, including the ACLU, which successfully sued the administration to block the citizenship question, disagreed.

"Trump may claim victory today, but this is nothing short of a total, humiliating defeat for him and his administration," said Dale Ho, director of the organization's Voting Rights Project.

And there were indications that Trump supporters, who were clamoring for the president to keep up the fight, also were unsatisfied with the outcome.

Trump's announcement was met with silence from most of his allies, rather than the usual cacophony of supportive statements for presidential actions.

The scene was reminiscent of one six months earlier in the same spot. In that case, Trump declared he was "very proud" to announce an agreement to end a debilitating government shutdown that had been sparked by his own insistence that Congress fund his long-sought border wall between the U.S. and Mexico. Despite Trump's bravado, no such funding materialized from lawmakers, as the president backed down in the face of mounting criticism and claimed victory anyway.

Weeks later, after lawmakers again rebuffed Trump's request for wall funding, he boasted that a wall "is being built as we speak."

"You are going to have to be in extremely good shape to get over this one," he added. "They would be able to climb Mount Everest a lot easier, I think."

In fact, Trump has added strikingly little length to barriers along the Mexico border despite his pre-eminent 2016 campaign promise to get a wall done.

Trump followed a similar pattern the day after his party lost the House in the midterm elections, bringing about divided government and a flood of Democratic oversight investigations. The president was unbowed, telling reporters, "I thought it was a very close to complete victory."

It's no surprise that Trump has difficulty conceding defeat, even when it's plain as day.

He rose to celebrity, and then the White House, with relentless self-promotion and touting the "Art of the Deal." In Trump's view, admitting defeat would pose an existential political risk to the candidate who famously rallied his supporters with promises that "We're going to win so much, you're going to be so sick and tired of winning."

Overseas, too, Trump rushes to claim victory when the facts paint a very different picture.

After his inaugural meeting with North Korea's Kim Jong Un, Trump flatly declared on Twitter that "There is no longer a Nuclear Threat from North Korea" — despite no change to its established stockpile. And last month, he embraced Kim at the demilitarized zone and insisted their second summit in Vietnam earlier this year had been a success, despite his own highly publicized walkout.

Trump also postponed steep tariffs he had announced on Mexico last month in an effort to push that country to curtail a surge in illegal border crossings. Even as he backed off, though, the president found reason to declare a win on a central campaign promise that has been largely unfulfilled as he prepared to formally launch his 2020 campaign.

After Trump claimed the deal would "greatly reduce, or eliminate, Illegal Immigration coming from Mexico and into the United States," he drew mockery from Democrats, including Senate Democratic leader Chuck Schumer, who sarcastically declared in response that it was "an historic night!"

Zeke Miller has covered the White House and politics in Washington since 2011.

© Copyright 2019 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

©2019 GPlusMedia Inc.


15 Comments
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It's not his job to micromanage every problem in the US. His job is to point out areas where the US is failing and delegate the task of solving those problems to the government civil service.

Problem is that most civil servants in place today were hired during the Obama and Clinton years and are woefully incompetent.

-18 ( +0 / -18 )

America please impeach or vote out this cretin in the next election.

11 ( +12 / -1 )

It's not his job to micromanage every problem in the US. His job is to point out areas where the US is failing and delegate the task of solving those problems to the government civil service.

False flag - nobody is accusing Trump of micromanaging. Try again, lol

12 ( +12 / -0 )

And back to reality. This author appear to be unable to distinguish between career government type who actually do create and perpetuate problems from CEO type who causes problems to be fixed and relatively quickly

-13 ( +0 / -13 )

Andrew TopolskiToday  10:52 am JST

CEO type who causes problems to be fixed and relatively quickly

Donald Trump doesn't appear to be one of them. He just seems to cause problems and claim that he's fixed them when in actual fact he hasn't.

9 ( +9 / -0 )

Trump the dumper and president MEGAGOB. Disrupt and put nothing in its place.

5 ( +5 / -0 )

Create some type of crisis or emotional moment, solve it by backing off, move on to the next one (turn in next week to find out)....

This is governing by reality TV show standards, designed to increase ratings - it's not effective or good governance.

The US government is not "The Apprentice", but our Impostor President hasn't the intellectual ability to realize that...

Time for Trumpers to understand that before this Dimwit tries to up his ratings by causing a war with Iran in which thousands could be killed.

Send him back to his TV studio, the one next to "The Kardashians"...

7 ( +7 / -0 )

What does this ay about the 40%+ of Americans that voted to make a reality TV hack their President?

This man is making America Great; a great circus and the laughingstock of the globe. This man will lead the world into another war and US citizens don't know how to control him.

7 ( +7 / -0 )

Congress voted yesterday to strip him of his power to declare war unilaterally. Mueller testifies before Congress next week. He may be implicated in the Epstein scandal. Link to the video deposition by “Katie Johnson” detailing her “social” interactions with Trump and Epstein, in 1994, when she was 13 years old.  http://bit.ly/2NJy2e6 (29:00)

https://www.snopes.com/news/2016/06/23/donald-trump-rape-lawsuit/

https://www.pbs.org/newshour/politics/assault-allegations-donald-trump-recapped

5 ( +5 / -0 )

Burning BushToday  07:20 am JST

His job is to point out areas where the US is failing and delegate the task of solving those problems to the government civil service.

It's funny how no presidential candidate ever says that in their election campaigns then, isn't it.

6 ( +6 / -0 )

Problem is that most civil servants in place today were hired during the Obama and Clinton years and are woefully incompetent.

So these civil servants were hired under Clinton, then they left for Dubya's 8 years, came back for Obama's 8, then hung around for Trump? Sounds legit. If only there were a more obvious reason for the incompetence of the Trump administration....

5 ( +5 / -0 )

If only there were a more obvious reason for the incompetence of the Trump administration....

Gee, can't think of one... no, hang on, there's a clue in the photo at the top of the article....

4 ( +4 / -0 )

If the past 2 and a half years are an example of what he means by making America great, heaven help us for the next 1 and a half year.

5 ( +5 / -0 )

The self proclaimed “genius” isn’t. The current occupant of the White House is a complete farce and the biggest threat to U.S. national security and global stability.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

My parents were immigrants. This is use has divided my home. I’m fully for finding who’s who. Why not? Isn’t security in great part achieved by knowing who our neighbors are? We have IDs for a reason. We don’t want illegals in our midst, get them jobs and security at home. Who’s responsible for wealth imbalance? Peace will not come within US borders, it’ll come at home, wherever it may be.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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